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Ebola has now spread into Liberia say Irish aid workers

first_imgAN IRISH AID agency has confirmed that the deadly Ebola virus has spread from Guinea into the neighboring West African state of Liberia.The report released by Plan Ireland confirms two separate cases of Ebola infection in Liberia, fuelling claims that the outbreak is becoming a regional epidemic.The most virulent strain of the deadly disease has already ravaged the forest area of southern Guinea, claiming the lives of over 60 people and infecting many more.The first confirmed death in Liberia occurred in the Lofa County area, and involved a woman who had fled Guinea to seek refuge following the death of all her household members.WHO health specialists are also investigating the death of a health worker at the border point between Foya in Liberia and Gueckedou in Guinea.Medical reports state that the health worker had experienced “bloody vomit and bleeding from nose”.Ibrahima Touré, Plan International Country Director in Guinea said that Ebola was one of the most virulent diseases known to mankind, with a fatality rate of up to 90 per cent.“Communities in the affected region stretch across the borders and people move freely within this area,” he said. “This poses a serious risk of the epidemic becoming widespread with devastating consequences”. Communities, especially children, in the border areas between Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are vulnerable and need immediate support. A large scale preventive action will need to be put in place rapidlyTravel has been restricted in ‘high risk areas’ of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia alongside the implementation of a host of safety precautionsThose working or living in affected areas have been advised to travel only if on essential business, to regularly wash hands, and to avoid eating bush meat.The deadly disease is suspected to have originated in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the mid 70s where there have been 8 outbreaks; the most recent in 2012 killed 34 people and infected 64.Once contracted, the Ebola virus attacks the body and overwhelms the immune system – it attacks every organ and tissue of the human body except the bones and skeletal muscles.Bleeding then occurs from body orifices and gaps in the skin. Huge loss of blood, renal failure, or shock leads to death – all these can happen between 2 to 21 days.Read: Ebola outbreak in Guinea ‘could become regional epidemic’ > Read: New book documents the rise in pandemic diseases and wonders what’s next >last_img

Xbox Live cloud storage starts coming online

first_imgDuring E3 Microsoft made an announcement that Xbox Live users were going to get cloud storage in the near future. What that enables is for your complete Xbox Live profile to be stored online, including your gamertag, achievements, save games, and even your current Microsoft points total. This was good news as it meant going from console-to-console becomes that much simpler. It also acts as an offsite backup for your information in case something goes wrong with your console.At the time there was no date set for the introduction of cloud storage, but over the holiday weekend it looks as though Microsoft flipped the switch, at least partially.Xbox Live users should now find that at least some Xbox Live Arcade games support the cloud storage option. We suspect Microsoft is just rolling the system out slowly to ensure it doesn’t fall over. In the comings weeks expect a wider range of games to have support enabled.As far as we can tell the cloud storage option is for both Silver and Gold Xbox Live members. If that’s the case Microsoft has gone one better than Sony which only offers cloud storage to PlayStation Plus members.Read more at Eurogamer.netMatthew’s OpinionIt was inevitable games consoles would eventually introduce cloud storage. To be honest, it’s a very easy feature for Microsoft and Sony to add. A profile may contain a lot of information, but in terms of size on disk it’s tiny. Now the feature is rolling out on Xbox Live it should solve a number of problems to do with transferring data between consoles and going round to a friend’s house to play on their machine.So we now have download games and online profiles. That doesn’t mean we can do away with disc distribution just yet for console games as the file sizes are so big, but it certainly seems to be heading in theat direction. At some point the speed of broadband coupled with the growing size of hard drives will make downloading gigabytes of data to a console a very quick operation. I doubt that will happen for the next round on console hardware, but the one after that could herald the end of optical drives in consoles.last_img

Turkish president claims Greeks burned Smyrna in 1922

first_imgDespite his recent call for peace with Greece, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has an odd way of going about it.He kicked off his general and presidential election campaign rally on Saturday with controversy, claiming that it was Greek soldiers who were responsible for the Great Fire of Smyrna that destroyed Izmir (formerly Smyrna) in 1922 while leaving after the Greco-Turkish War (1919-1922).“The biggest blow given to this beautiful city is by the Greek soldiers who burned Izmir as they retreated,” Erdogan said during a speech at Izmir’s Chamber of Commerce.He attempted to support his argument by claiming that Turkish soldiers “did not want to destroy or burn – they always wanted to build and create”, proven by Izmir’s rapid development after the war.The fire took place four days after Turkish forces took control of the city on 9 September, 1922, and went on to destroy much of the port city. It is estimated that tens of thousands of Greeks and Armenians died in the fire.Erdogan is not the first to make such a claim; other conservative Turkish sources believe that it was both Greeks and Armenians who started the fire in a bid to damage the reputation of the Turks. However this is contrary to what the majority of historians say, including Niall Ferguson and Richard Clogg who concluded that it was Turkish forces who destroyed the city. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img

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