Chile Builds Its First Icebreaker Ship

first_imgBy Carolina Contreras/Diálogo July 20, 2017 K8cGSL Latin America’s maritime industry has a new player. The Chilean Navy will build its first icebreaker ship, Antártica 1 at an estimated total cost of $315 million. Its design and basic engineering will be completed in September, while the shipyard Astilleros y Maestranza de la Armada (ASMAR, per its Spanish acronym) will begin the shipbuilding phase during the third quarter at its plant in Talcahuano, located 505 kilometers from Santiago. “This will be the first shipyard in Latin America to build one of these vessels, incorporating new technology and improved processes,” Alejandro König, the manager of ASMAR Talcahuano Naval Construction, told Diálogo. According to the timeline, the polar ship will have a useful life of 30 years and will be operational in time for the 2022-2023 National Antarctic Campaign season. Antártica 1 will have modern features that will allow Chile to project its presence in the white continent, in order to support scientific studies globally, give logistical support to Chilean and international bases, and offer the capabilities necessary for carrying out search-and-rescue efforts. “The study of science on the Antarctic Peninsula will continue to be strengthened,” José Retamales, the director of the Chilean Antarctic Institute (INACh, per its Spanish acronym) told Diálogo. “Physical, chemical, and biological oceanographic studies will be performed, with spaces set aside for specific use by the scientists,” he added. The genesis of the project The Antártica 1 Project originated in 2011 when it had become evident that the icebreaker Almirante Óscar Viel (AP-46) was at the end of its useful life cycle and a replacement had to be considered. The Chilean Navy’s Directorate of Programs, Research and Development, and ASMAR’s Department of Naval Construction Projects jointly compiled the requirements from the various lead agencies involved in the national Antarctic work: INACh, Chilean Army, Air Force, and, especially, Navy. The official start of the project was marked by a symbolic steel-cutting ceremony held on May 9th at ASMAR’s facilities in Talcahuano. “This will place the country at the forefront of protection and projection on the continent of Antarctica and the surrounding area,” said Chilean President Michelle Bachelet during the formal ceremony. She was accompanied by Admiral Enrique Larragaña, the commander in chief of the Chilean Navy, and Minister of Defense José Antonio Gómez. Technical and operational capacities Antártica 1 will be an Ice Class (PC5) icebreaker, whose basic engineering is in the hands of the Canadian company, Vard Marine. It will measure 111 meters long and 21 meters wide, with a draft of seven meters. It will be able to sail at a constant speed of two knots in ice up to one meter thick, covered in 30 centimeters of snow. In normal weather conditions, it will have a maximum speed of 15 knots. Thanks to its hull, it can operate in extremely cold environments – at minus 30 degrees Celsius. It will have a 60-day autonomous range without resupply, a 120-person capacity, and it will be able to operate 250 days a year, unlike the Almirante Óscar Viel (AP-46), which could do so only in the summer months. Chile has four facilities in Antarctica which operate year round, plus eight summer bases, and seven shelters spread out over the South Shetland Islands archipelago and the Antarctic Peninsula. The Chilean bases, as well as those of other countries, will receive logistical support from this new ship. For such purposes, Antártica 1 will have the capacity to transport up to 910 cubic meters of cargo and 400 cubic meters of fuel. It will also have a flight deck and a hangar for two transport helicopters. Additionally, it will have loading cranes, capstans, and davits, while 10 tons of scientific equipment, plus a 10-meter mechanical arm can be set up at the stern. “Antártica 1 will have greater capabilities for supporting high-level, onboard scientific activities which will allow it to break from the seasonality of scientific work, accessing data in real time, and analyzing the results obtained while underway,” Retamales said. “It will have modern, hydroacoustic equipment, such as echo sounding, sonar, an ocean floor profiler, a current profiler, and a high-precision acoustic positioning system. It will also be outfitted with biology, microbiology, and chemistry labs, and it will have the means for collecting, storing, and preserving water samples and samples from the seabed, with the capacity provided by modern and spacious refrigeration chambers,” he added. “It will also be ready to conduct search-and-rescue duties in the event of sea, land, or air accidents in Antarctica, with support from onboard helicopters, rescue boats, and a sick bay with surgical capacities,” König said. “It will meet the highest standards of safety for protecting human life at sea, as set forth in the Polar Code, and it will also comply with environmental regulations concerning water treatment, gas emissions, and waste processing.” Regional contribution ASMAR’s plant in Talcahuano – which was destroyed by an earthquake in February 2010 – has been completely remodeled to move forward the Chilean Navy’s major construction challenge. The plant’s manufacturing capacities were expanded and improved, and its personnel training updated as well. Building a vessel of this scale represents a benefit to the region where ASMAR is located, since more than one-third of the project will be done using local labor and will create 480 jobs over the next five years. It is foreseen that once Antártica 1 is ready, it will serve as the key to opening up international interest in manufacturing ships of this size and greater. “The fact of having modernized our technical and manufacturing capabilities will keep us at the forefront of naval construction,” König concluded.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces More Than $157 Million in Restitution Payments to Pennsylvania Consumers in 2016

first_img February 27, 2017 Government That Works,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced that the Insurance Department reclaimed $157.5 million for more than 12,000 consumers throughout the state during 2016.“Consumer protection is a top priority for my administration,” said Governor Wolf. “We will always hold businesses to the highest standards and will continue to work to ensure consumers are afforded all of the rights and protections guaranteed to them by Pennsylvania law.”“Throughout 2016, the Insurance Department helped 12,165 consumers around Pennsylvania receive some form of restitution payment or credit,” said Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller.Examples of recovered funds include:• Restoration of stolen funds when an agent collected payment from a consumer for a policy or annuity but did not send the money to the insurance company;• Processing and payment of previously denied or underpaid claims when a company did not pay a claim as it should under the consumer’s policy;• Refunding of overcharged premiums when an insurance company was found to be charging premiums above the rate that had been approved by the Insurance Department;• Making payment under a multi-state settlement with life insurance companies. Pennsylvania is a leader in an on-going, multi-state examination of life insurance companies that has resulted in companies entering settlement agreements requiring them to reform business practices. Some companies in the industry were making selective use of the Social Security Administration’s Death Master File (DMF), and instead of paying policy benefits upon a policyholder’s death, the companies were only terminating payment of annuity benefits. These companies will now properly use the DMF to identify potentially unpaid insurance benefits and locate beneficiaries.The Insurance Department is charged with upholding fair business practice standards for consumers, companies, and insurance professionals to ensure that consumers in Pennsylvania receive all protections to which they are entitled under the state’s laws and regulations. This work involves researching and resolving complaints from consumers, investigating allegations of misconduct from insurance companies, agents, brokers, and others, and ensuring that practicing professionals are properly licensed.Commissioner Miller also noted that in some cases, the department’s findings can result in additional penalties, such as a suspension or revocation of a license, being assessed against the offending party.If you have a question about your insurance or need to file a complaint, you may contact the Insurance Department’s Bureau of Consumer Services at 1-877-881-6388 or online at http://www.insurance.pa.gov/. Governor Wolf Announces More Than $157 Million in Restitution Payments to Pennsylvania Consumers in 2016center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Inner-west suburbs are low on land supply but high on lifestyle

first_imgAugustus ResidencesDesigned by Red Door Architecture the exterior uses wide glass facades to capture the light and enhance the living spaces.“The collaboration of the magnificent design team, esteemed developers and the highest quality builders, ensure Augustus Residences is a building worthy of becoming an iconic landmark in Toowong,” Mr Watson said. Augustus Residences“This unprecedented growth is due to the planning and completion of major infrastructure projects in the area, such as the Legacy Way tunnel and the $50 million Toowong Village transformation,” he said.“Strong public transport connectivity to Brisbane’s CBD and the University of Queensland has brought 112,000 plus tertiary students to the area and has transformed Toowong into a premier social hub with a variety of bars, restaurants and cafes located throughout.”Augustus Residences is 3.5km to the CBD but with the benefit of being in a suburb well known for its abundance of tree-lined streets and open space.With both mountain and city views the development offers a rooftop pool and sky-deck with stunning 360 panoramic views for an oasis retreat from the city hustle. Augustus ResidencesAugustus Residences is appealing to a range of buyers but with young professionals being the dominant buying group.“Toowong is a highly sought suburb by owner-occupiers and investors, a lot of whom are driven by the proximity to the University of Queensland and the CBD,” Mr Watson said.Mr Watson said the suburb was experiencing high levels of population, employment and economic growth previously not known to the area. Augustus Residences, being developed by Golden State Property Developments, is underway in Toowong bringing 90 apartments to the inner-west corridor.A TOUGH residential corridor to break into is no barrier to this development company who are determined to provide opulent apartment living in the well established inner-west.Golden State Property Developments is well underway with the construction of its Augustus Residences development in Augustus St, Toowong.The 90 unit one, two and three-bedroom development set over eight levels is already 80 per cent sold. Augustus ResidencesTomkins Commercial and Industrial builders began construction in January with completion targeted for the end of March 2018.Golden State Property Developments director Jim Watson said the company had identified Brisbane’s inner-west corridor, and in particular Toowong, as a good place to develop due to is high barrier to entry.“Unlike other inner-city precincts, there was no existing industry that vacated and left behind large tracts of land that could be redeveloped into numerous residential towers,” Mr Watson said.“It is an established residential precinct that required us to aggregate two apartment blocks to create the opportunity.”More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours agolast_img read more

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New Isle of Capri home fetches more than $1 million

first_img6b St Pauls Place, Isle of Capri.Ms Smith said 6a was still up for grabs but she didn’t think it would be on the market for much longer.“I’ve got very, very strong interest on the other one as well,” she said.“Isle of Capri is such a hot suburb at the moment.”The property was marketed with a price tag of $1.595 million. 6b St Pauls Place, Isle of Capri.“We had about 88 groups through in the five week campaign,” she said.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa16 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“It sold to a local couple and it’s going to be their new home.“They loved the location, the proximity to everything, the fact that it was brand new was also very appealing.“The sellers are really happy with the result and the buyers are really excited to move into their home.”An older house was knocked down to make way for two homes on the property, both of which were listed for sale. 6b St Pauls Place, Isle of Capri.HOUSE hunters came in droves to sneak a peek at this new Isle of Capri home before it sold for $1.55 million.The four-bedroom, four-bathroom modern duplex at 6b St Pauls Place changed hands last week through Sonja Smith, the principal of Luxure the Property People.She said it was a record price for a dry-block property on the Isle of Capri.center_img 6b St Pauls Place, Isle of Capri.last_img read more

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Oshkosh sees four first-time 2017 winners

first_imgBy Dave PanskeOSHKOSH, Wis. (May 19) – Four feature events produced as many different first-time 2017 win­ners Friday at Oshkosh SpeedZone Raceway.Automotive Supply Company IMCA Modified checkers flew for Steve Schneider after a long battle with Dan Roedl.Jeremy Christians took the lead on the seventh lap of the Outlaw Chassis IMCA Stock Car main and left the rest of the field to race for second place.Brock Saunders got the best of the Don Herman Auto Repair IMCA Northern SportMod field for the first time locally since July 31 of 2015.Mike Meier took the lead in the Lynn’s Service Center IMCA Sport Compacts on lap four and de­spite heavy pressure from Chris Maas for much of the second half of the race, was able to win his first feature of the season.A solid field of 121 cars filled the pit area on a windy night at Oshkosh.last_img read more

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NPFL: Asiegbu, Newman, Odey Vie for VAT Wonder Goal 6

first_imgAkwa United striker Musa Newman, Shedrack Asiegbu of Abia Warriors and the NPFL leading scorer and MFM FC striker Stephen Odey have emerged as the men in the running for the VAT Wonder Goal 6.The three goals were among 18 scored on Match-day 25.Newman’s goal was Akwa United’s second in a 2-0 win over Katsina United while Asiegbu’s strike was the first of his brace in a tight contest with league leaders Plateau United which his club Abia Warriors triumphed 2-1. The goal scored by Odey for MFM against Kano Pillars temporarily put the game at 1-1 and later represented scant consolation as Pillars ran out 3-1 winners.The build-up to Asiegbu’s goal began with a throw-in on the right channel of Abia Warriors’ attack. Yakub Hammed threw the ball to Sunday Adetunji who shielded it nicely at the edge of Plateau United’s box before cushioning it to Uche Ihuarulam whose intended cross took a deflection off the back of Plateau United’s Jimmy Ambrose.The ball then fell kindly to Asiegbu who controlled with his chest towards his left foot and struck sweetly into the top corner beyond Plateau United goalkeeper Dele Ajiboye for the first of his two goals on the Match-day under review.Katsina United’s sloppy defending was a reason that led to Newman’s goal for Akwa United who were at the time leading by a goal at the Godswill Akpabio Stadium, Uyo. Akwa United attacked from the left, Katsina United could not clear their lines and that allowed in a cross into the box which an unmarked Newman directed his headed attempt downward into the net past goalkeeper Okoli Okoli.For the goal scored by Odey, it was a typical MFM style of playing from the back with short passes. Sikiru Olatunbosun and playmaker Chukwuka Onuwa were involved in a brilliant interchange of passes before the former slipped Odey through on goal. The NPFL leading scorer used his pace to good effect, leaving the Kano Pillars’ defence in his wake. He then calmly picked his spot to beat David Obiazo in goal.Voting for the VAT Wonder Goal 6 commences on the NPFL website and Twitter account.and will end at midnight of Thursday, July 6, 2017.The VAT Wonder Goal Award attracts a cash prize of N150, 000 for the winner with half of the money donated to a Charity to be nominated by the player within the state where the club is located. It is supported by the Federal Inland Revenue Services (FIRS) to promote club-community relationship and also create awareness for tax education.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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Roberson returns to floor after missing 2 games, plays 12 minutes in loss to Michigan

first_imgANN ARBOR, Mich. — Tyler Roberson played his first minutes for Syracuse since Nov. 21 when he came on for B.J. Johnson just 1:13 into Syracuse’s 68-65 loss to Michigan on Tuesday night.It was his first appearance since SU beat Iowa in the consolation game of the 2K Classic in Madison Square Garden, as the forward sat out two games with an abdominal strain. The sophomore who started for the Orange (5-2) in the team’s first four games of the season played 12 minutes against Michigan (6-1) and finished with five points.“I think he helped us a little bit and we need him to contribute more,” SU forward Chris McCullough said.Roberson’s 12 minutes in his return were a season-low. After quickly coming on for Johnson, Roberson was subbed out nearly as quickly himself. He played just 1:24 before getting yanked by Boeheim for missing a rotation on defense.Roberson fixed the issue, he said, and he went on to play another nine minutes in the first half and tallied two points on 1-of-2 shooting, a rebound and a steal.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe forward started the second half, but with the game on the line, he played just three minutes after the break, going 1-of-3 from the floor and adding an and-one free throw with 8:15 to play.But that was his last contribution of the day. The 6-foot-8 forward left the game at the 6:56 mark and could only watch as Syracuse fought for and lost a game of loose-ball scrambles down the stretch.“You can always think like that, but when you’re out there you got to do what you have to do and stuff like that, and contribute,” Roberson said. “It’s a tough loss.” Comments Published on December 3, 2014 at 12:54 pm Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_ Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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USC Price offers new degree

first_imgThe Sol Price School of Public Policy is offering a new bachelor of science degree in real estate development this semester. Price is offering the new undergraduate degree almost 30 years after it became an industry leader by founding one of the first graduate real estate development programs in the country in 1986.Director Christian Redfearn emphasized the importance of wanting to “change the culture of real estate.” Redfearn expressed his interest in opening up 21st century educational opportunities to undergraduates.“We wanted a larger real estate community. The world has changed and [the real estate] industry has changed so much,” he said. “We sat down and talked to potential employers in the field and created an academic plan to submit to the dean which was approved. We are [still] tweaking — we took the building blocks from the graduate program and asked, ‘How do we build around them?’”Associate Director Sonia Savoulian said the bachelor of science degree intends to introduce students to the world of real estate development.“[The undergraduate program is] much more about laying a foundation, while the master’s in real estate development is really more about adding advanced training intended to be for people who have already been working in the [real estate development] field,” she said.Specifically the undergraduate program starts with a broader prerequisite track than the more advanced and specified master’s program. The undergraduate real estate development program also relies heavily on finance and accounting training, while the undergraduate policy, planning and development relies heavily on courses related to policy and governance issues.Redfearn believes that the undergraduate program provides a well-rounded approach in preparing not only graduate students but also undergraduates for the rigors of the real estate profession. Redfearn stressed the fact that the undergraduate real estate development program should rely heavily on an interdisciplinary tradition.“We want to produce really good thinkers. [Our program] is not finance and it’s not architecture — it’s a very interdisciplinary degree,” he said. “Many students don’t realize the large range of subjects and issues that are covered by real estate development.”Redfaern said it is crucial for students to be able to synthesize large amounts of information.“There are all of these trends — you are essentially making a bet on the area and the city [at large],” he said. “I want our students to consider the bigger picture.”Savoulian reinforced the importance of the bigger picture the real estate development major takes into account.“Our students are curious about the nature of cities,” Savoulian said. “While financial knowledge is important, in the big picture, they want to play a role in creating places in cities, they want to understand the urban context.”Samantha Schroff, a freshman majoring in real estate development, said she was drawn to the new program because of her diverse interests.“I had so many varied interests in real estate, business, finance, community service and philanthropy, and I really had no clue how I was going to be able to bring them all together,” she said in an email to the Daily Trojan. “And then I attended the Price reception on Admitted Student Day, and Professor Redfearn and Managing Director Sonia Savoulian, announced the real estate development bachelor of science [degree]. I felt a huge sense of relief and excitement because the [program] just really seemed to fit all of my criteria and was going to be able to join all of my diverse interests into one cohesive program of study.”At the beginning of the semester, Redfearn took the new students in the program to explore downtown Los Angeles.“We took 25 incoming undergrads on a tour,” Redfearn said. “We started at Grand Park, [and] we talked about the role of public transit in cities. We visited the real estate property manager for the L.A. Times, [and] we thought about why Whole Foods is coming downtown and the demographics of cities. By the end of the day, 25 students who thought they knew what real estate was were blown away. We raised their awareness.”Schroff said the tour reinforced her decision to pursue the new degree.“It was awesome to see how planning, finance, city leaders and real estate professionals all come together to work on a development project, and it is neat to see how DTLA is having a revitalization similar to downtown Santa Ana in Orange County,” she said.last_img read more

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Wrigley Institute dives into sustainability

first_imgTake note · Postdoctoral student Andy Navarette uses an underwater pencil and paper to collect notes on a section of a kelp forest off the coast of Catalina Island. (Emily Smith | Daily Trojan)Most faculty and students don’t get to see a beautiful ocean sunrise or a pod of dolphins on their commute to class. But for researchers at USC’s environmental research center on Catalina Island, it’s all part of an average day. A 5 a.m. wake-up call to beat traffic on the 110 Freeway and 90 minutes on turbulent waters separate staff and students from the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies on Catalina. USC’s personal shuttle on the sea, the Miss Christi, takes visitors through the roughly 25 nautical miles from the port of San Pedro to the research center at least five days a week.The Wrigley Marine Science Center was founded by Philip Wrigley, son of chewing gum magnate William Wrigley Jr. and a dedicated environmentalist who donated his family’s land on Catalina Island for conservation. The USC Wrigley Institute opened as an extension of the Marine Science Center in 1995, as a dedicated space for research in sustainable initiatives. Since then, the island has been a model for implementation of sustainable practices and a hotbed for environmental research.Some notable projects hosted on Catalina include a large-scale measurement of metal contamination in Southern California’s coastal waters, monitoring the effects of light pollution on coastal marine animals, exploring the evolution of the endangered island fox and ongoing research in food sustainability — from aquaponics gardening to revolutionary methods of composting with the help of black soldier flies. Diane Kim, associate director of the Wrigley Institute, is working on a project to convert kelp into a biofuel that could someday replace gasoline.“It’s pretty straightforward … and I think there’s a lot of power in that, that a lot of really innovative solutions are also simple ones,” Kim said. Kelp, a species of macroalgae,  is turned into a biofuel through  a process called hydrothermal liquefaction. This involves drying the kelp, then processing the biomass in an extremely hot, pressurized and wet environment for long periods of time to allow the breakdown of the solid chemical structure. Typically, the product of this process is a biocrude, which can be further distilled or processed into a fuel that can be used just like any petroleum-based fuel. Kim and her colleagues, a team of faculty, undergraduate and graduate researchers from USC, as well as partners at eco-tech company Marine BioEnergy, have been working on the kelp project for about two years now. The key to their work is cooperation, involving specialists such as chemical engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and business analysts from Marine BioEnergy who are looking into the future commercialization of kelp as a biofuel.First-year graduate students Rilee Sanders and Tristan Jordan-Huffman have been working on the project as field research assistants. The pair spent the past summer out on the island doing two to three dives per day to monitor juvenile kelp plants and determine the optimal timing for stationing the kelp in the ocean.In other countries, researchers have already been looking into kelp as a biofuel source for the last few years. However, the researchers at Wrigley and Marine BioEnergy have come up with an innovative way to farm the massive amounts of kelp necessary for a commercialized fuel source: a so-called “kelp elevator.” The current prototype models use PVC pipes in the ocean to grow the kelp. The pipes also cycle them from the surface where the light is to the deep water where the nutrients are.“We’re talking about areas almost the size of the United States in total, so you need a lot of space to do that,” Kim said.The solution is to go out into the open ocean, away from the coast, which humans already heavily rely on for resources and recreation. “Instead of taking the nutrients to the kelp, we’re taking the kelp to the nutrients,” Kim said, adding that the toughest part is working against the currents. Eventually, the team hopes the growing model will be much more technologically advanced.Island Kelp · Giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, which is used to generate a biofuel, can grow up to three feet per day under optimal conditions. (Emily Smith | Daily Trojan)“We don’t want to battle the ocean, we want to go with the flow literally, so we want this free-floating autonomous farm that’s pulled by drones that are powered by solar,” Kim said.It sounds like a Jetsons-esque utopia, but this could be the reality of a future without fossil fuels. Kelp is one of the fastest growing plants on the planet, according to Sanders. And unlike traditionally farmed plants, it requires no fresh water, fertilizer, pesticides or fertile land. These attributes make kelp a viable potential substitute for traditional fuels, as it can be sustainably farmed, harvested and converted into biofuel.The USC Wrigley Institute’s research is part of a larger effort to get the United States’ biofuel production caught up to the rest of the world. Other countries like Sweden and Japan have been farming kelp in large quantities for decades taking advantage of the crop’s nutritional benefits in their regular diet. Thus, they already have a working kelp-farming infrastructure to use and develop.But the faculty and students working on the project are optimistic that they can overcome these early hurdles and revolutionize the fuel industry.“If we can not only prove that it can be done, but that it can be done efficiently and in a competitive way with other biofuels then it really has the potential to be a leading factor in the industry,” Jordan-Huffman said. Kim stressed that the team is not focused on profit, but rather commercial viability in a competitive fuel market.“The Wrigley Institute supports any project that is looking for sustainable solutions to some of our biggest environmental challenges, and energy is certainly one of those,” Kim said. Sanders has faith in his colleagues. He noted the importance of having dedicated researchers in specific areas — including ocean conservation, chemical engineering and economics — so that they can become experts on these relatively new scientific developments. “What we’re attempting to do … is really transformative for the future in terms of biofuel usage and just the possibilities that exist when you put smart people together and figure some things out,” Sanders said.This story is part of “Speck of Green,” an environmental series by the Daily Trojan.last_img read more

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Syracuse on the verge of 1st NCAA tournament berth

first_img Published on November 14, 2018 at 12:10 am Contact Eric: estorms@syr.edu Comments Syracuse volleyball has never made the NCAA tournament. But after 23 of 26 regular season games, the Orange (16-7, 12-3 Atlantic Coast) rank No. 31 in RPI, the metric used by the committee to select the 32 at-large bids to the tournament — 32 receive automatic bids by winning the conference.“In this spot it’s really scary,” head coach Leonid Yelin said. “How close are we gonna get? You can even smell it. So, this is from my past experience, it’s a very dangerous time.”SU only has a few comparable seasons. In 2004, the Orange started 25-5 before a loss to Pittsburgh in the regular season finale followed by another loss against the Panthers in the Big East Tournament kept SU from advancing further. In 2010, the Orange were 21-3 before dropping six of their last eight, once again not doing enough to get in.Since he was hired as head coach in 2012, the closest Yelin has gotten Syracuse to the tournament was the 2015 season. The Orange entered November that season at 14-6, and despite going 9-2 over the final month, the eight losses were enough to keep Syracuse out of a tournament bid.“I think we’re OK right now,” senior Jalissa Trotter said. “I think everyone is pleased with our standing. We definitely could be ranked a little better but we did take a hit or two from some losses. But I think right now everyone knows that’s very important to keep that spot or to get a better RPI.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textYelin valued the RPI metric and made sure his team was challenged early in the season. While the Orange normally play a home tournament against unranked opponents, SU passed on that this season, in part because there weren’t enough high-quality opponents that wanted to play.Laura Angle | Digital Design EditorInstead, the Orange headed to the Marquette Tournament where SU faced off against Marquette (18th in current RPI), USC (7th) and BYU (5th). Syracuse lost all three games.Pittsburgh all but guaranteed the ACC’s automatic bid sitting with a 26-1 record, meaning the Orange need to get in as an at-large team. A win over then-No. 22 Louisville (36th) stands out as SU’s biggest resume booster. Aside from losses against Iowa (68th) and Notre Dame (62nd), Syracuse has only lost to top-30 RPI teams.SU’s remaining three games are against Virginia Tech (143rd), Wake Forest (208th) and NC State (92nd), meaning any loss would be their worst of the season.The seniors realize how close they are, having worked four years to reach this point.“They know,” Yelin said. “Of course they know. We’re trying not to talk about it because there are a lot of things you want to make your players not thinking too much about this and get stuck trying to be afraid to do something to win.” Trotter and fellow senior Santita Ebangwese both said the players follow the RPI closely. But right before each game, they try not to think about it, instead focusing on game plan and how exactly to beat the opponent at hand.Senior Christina Oyawale said everyone on the team is dedicated to the moment, knowing something larger is in play. Any loss from this point forward could send the team to the wrong side of the tournament bubble.“You can see it in faces, you can see it their hearts in when we talk,” Oyawale said. “It’s not just a ‘Let’s go get this.’ It’s everyone coming to show up and do their part, and that’s what we need to move forward.”Associate head coach Erin Little said the biggest challenge going forward will be keeping the players fresh, especially as schoolwork increases toward finals. The turnover from traveling can also increase fatigue this late in the season.But the formula for the Orange to finally crack the big dance is straightforward.Said Yelin: “Very simple: keep winning.” Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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