An explosion of creativity

first_imgDiane Paulus sat perched on the back of a chair in a basement rehearsal space in Harvard Square on a recent afternoon, watching the scene play out before her like an entranced cat observing a mouse.Suddenly, she pounced.Springing from her seat, the diminutive director stopped the action to emphasize a line, solicit feedback from her actors, tweak an entrance, and perfect the use of a small prop.Paulus was carefully preparing the ensemble for the American Repertory Theater’s (A.R.T.) final production of the year, “Johnny Baseball.”The new musical, making its world premiere at the A.R.T., fuses fact and fiction with the infamous “curse” that surrounded the Boston Red Sox. The plot follows the intersecting lives of three main characters over a series of decades, addressing the realities of racism, and in particular the ball club’s troubling record on integration. The Red Sox were the last team in major league baseball to hire African-American players, only after having passed on greats like Jackie Robinson and Willie Mays.Paulus calls the show a “deeply moving and intellectually stimulating work,” one she hopes will educate audiences about the team’s past while also showcasing a story of love, heartbreak, and redemption.“It’s important for people to know the history of this town 50 years ago, and to be able to understand how we are moving forward from that. This show is not so much about looking backward as truly looking forward.”Looking ahead, often in untraditional ways, while always keeping a keen eye on what has gone before, is what Paulus is all about. It’s at the heart of her mission to “expand the boundaries of theater” as the new artistic director of the A.R.T.After a successful first season, the verdict appears to be a decided mission accomplished, and then some.Fresh from a successful revival of the musical “Hair” on Broadway, the New York native took the helm of the A.R.T. and brought her characteristic kinetic drive to the post, developing a number of bold productions around the themes of Shakespeare and the past American century. The works, many of them highly stylized and unconventional, drew new and old audiences to the stage, and sometimes literally onto it.As part of the “Shakespeare Exploded” festival, Paulus, in collaboration with the British theater troupe Punchdrunk, converted a nearby vacant school into a haunted theater space for “Sleep No More,” a reimagining of the Bard’s tragedy “Macbeth.” Theatergoers donned white masks as they wandered through a maze of transformed corridors and classrooms to follow the chilling action, largely absent of dialogue.Paulus set “The Donkey Show,” based on Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” in the opulent and over-the-top disco era of the 1970s. Glitter, glamour, and a pulsating soundtrack provide the backdrop at club OBERON, the A.R.T.’s theater space on Arrow Street, where the audience doubles as disco dancers on the club’s floor, amid the actors and the action.Included in her inaugural season were Clifford Odets’ play “Paradise Lost,” about a family struggling during the Great Depression, and “Gatz,” a seven-hour theatrical reading of the entire text of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby.”“I wanted to make as bold a start to my time here as I could,” said Paulus. “We took our mission to the mat, which is to expand the boundaries of theater. What is so encouraging is that the audience met us more than halfway on this bold foray into a new way of thinking about theater.”Her work and vision already have paid dividends, with many of her productions generating an almost frantic buzz and attracting countless repeat attendees. “The Donkey Show,” originally scheduled to end its run last fall, has been extended through this summer to accommodate the crowds. In addition, this year the A.R.T. sold more than 1,000 student passes, three times the number of previous years.Paulus ’88 has broadened the theater’s reach in part by engaging directly with the community from which she came, working in tandem with Harvard professors to co-teach classes on campus and during the winter break developing a theater workshop for young undergraduates aspiring to careers in theater.She sees interacting with the undergraduate community as a central part of her mission, calling students “the future of the theater.”“We need to get them to understand that part of the enriching liberal arts experience is the A.R.T.”Music, atypical theater spaces, and collaborations with the University community all play important roles in next season’s recently announced program, which will include the musical “Cabaret,” starring Amanda Palmer of Dresden Dolls fame, and what Paulus calls the rock protest musical “Prometheus Bound.” Also on tap are the opera “Death in the Powers,” a work being developed by the MIT Media Lab in partnership with the A.R.T. that will feature state-of-the-art robots, and a show currently in development that she hopes will operate as a type of theatrical scavenger hunt.“To me, the mandate for every show is that it grabs the audience, intellectually, emotionally, in certain cases physically,” said Paulus. “Next year’s season will definitely offer that exciting range.”To view next season’s schedule.last_img read more

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NY Bans Incineration Disposal Of Toxic Firefighting Foam

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock Photo: PixabayALBANY (AP) — New York has banned the disposal of toxic firefighting foam by incineration in certain cities after environmental groups raised concerns about an Albany-area firm that had incinerated foam for two years under a Department of Defense contract.The law signed Monday by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, was designed to prevent the Norlite hazardous waste incinerator in Cohoes from resuming the burning of foam containing perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, chemicals known collectively as PFAS.The Department of Environmental Conservation ordered Norlite to cease disposal of the material in 2019, and the city of Cohoes enacted a one-year moratorium on PFAS incineration last April. The company said it hasn’t processed the material since December 2019 and would not do so unless testing supported by the state and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency showed thermal destruction was the safest and most effective means of disposal.But local residents, elected officials and environmental groups sought a permanent ban after learning the facility has incinerated more than 2 million pounds of foam through contracts with the Pentagon that have since been canceled. The company had also incinerated foam shipped from firehouses across the East Coast as the material is being phased out due to concerns over possible toxicity. “This establishes a national precedent that other states should follow,” Judith Enck, former Region 2 administrator for the EPA, said in a statement.PFAS are human-made chemicals that research suggests can cause health problems in humans. The chemicals have been used for decades in a range of products, including firefighting foam and stain-resistant sprays. They are known as “forever chemicals” because of their longevity in the environment and resistance to destruction.The new state law says it applies to cities designated as environmental justice areas and with 16,000 to 17,000 residents. But it was aimed at Cohoes because Norlite is the only facility in New York, and one of a handful nationwide, known to have processed PFAS foam.“We’re looking forward to building on this success and broadening it to a statewide ban,” said Rob Hayes, clean water associate for Environmental Advocates New York. He said PFAS foam could be incinerated at several other facilities around the state.“Because PFAS foam is not regulated as a hazardous waste and has few disposal requirements, it could theoretically also be incinerated at a municipal waste combustion facility, of which there are 10 spread across the state, Hayes said. ”We have not heard of any PFAS foam waste being sent to the listed hazardous waste incinerators or a municipal waste incinerator.”last_img read more

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More Power to You, Girl.

first_img“Where’s that fella of yours?”In the midst of setting up the Go in the pouring rain, I turn around to see an older gentleman standing beside the Jeep, clad in a cotton t-shirt and matching gym shorts. He seems unaware of my discomfort with his presence.“There isn’t one,” I reply bluntly.A nervous knot begins to pulse in my stomach. Most conversations that begin with the mention of a guy, a boyfriend, a partner of any sort, usually end up in me getting feisty and defensive. Plus, he’s standing in the pouring rain without even a floppy hat on to at least allude to the fact that he might at least recognize it’s precipitating.No. Instead, he stands there soaking up every rain droplet like a sponge as he eyeballs my every move.“I could have sworn I seen one.”“Nope. Just me.” I say, hoping he picks up on my shortness.I return to my tasks, hustling now to assemble the rig and disappear inside. I’m tired, hungry, wet, cold, and now, feeling very much self-conscious and alone. There are times when I crave the company of others, and times when I’d rather hole away in the woods or turn invisible. Right now, I’m feeling the latter.“Well I’ll be damned! It was you I saw then,” he says, suddenly starting to chuckle.My patience drained, I rip back the hood of my rain shell so he can more clearly see my face, my piercing gaze that, in my mind, says “beat it, buddy.”“You don’t see many ladies camping out in the woods by themselves,” he says, still smiling. “More power to you, girl.” With this last comment, he nods and winks, turning his back and retreating into the misty fog.I stand there incredulously, watching him slowly shuffle down the road. He didn’t ask me about the Go, which is usually the first question I receive, oftentimes before even a greeting of any sort. He didn’t ask me what Blue Ridge Outdoors was, or what I was doing as a lady camping out in the woods by myself. Though initially I was suspicious, wary, he proved to be harmless.That’s been the case for the most part since I hit the road in April. I have yet to encounter an individual who made me feel truly uncomfortable or in danger. While I think that speaks to the good nature of people in the South, in the back of my mind, I still find myself mulling over worst-case-scenarios, escape plans, potential weapons of defense. It sounds a little irrational, but I’m not ignorant of what can happen.That being said, I also feel that, in general, women are much safer traveling alone than society tends to portray. I’ve received concerns from friends, family members, the boss, even total strangers. Yes, I agree, I absolutely need to keep my wits about me on the road, but not simply because I’m a woman. Anyone traveling alone at any time should be conscious of their surroundings, and I think that’s just the key to mitigating being cornered or ending up in the wrong place at the wrong time: be aware (that and mad judy choppin’ skills – Kung Fu Hillbilly’s got the hook up if you need a crash course).For instance, I don’t go on a run in an urban area in the evening by myself. Or if I do I tell someone and bring a headlamp. I don’t wear clothing that draws unwanted attention (you’re lucky to catch me in anything but the same Eddie Bauer skort and shirt I rock almost every day). I don’t wear make up. I don’t smell bad, but I certainly don’t smell good either. I don’t go to bars alone. I have yet to camp out in a parking lot overnight.But these are really just matters of preference, and not so much things I believe that women should not do at all. If you want to don a cute dress, throw on some perfume, a pair of heels, and hit the town solo, do it. Same if you want to pack your bag and hike for days on end. There’s nothing, and should be no one, stopping you.Recently there have been a lot of TV commercials released that have in some way addressed our perception on women and how the manner in which we treat young ladies can drastically impact their decisions later in life (see the latest Always and Verizon commercials for examples). In a time when, in my opinion, children are over-coddled anyway, I find it particularly irritating when girls are met with hesitance, doubt even, on their abilities to handle the adversities of adventure or traveling solo.There are amazing women in this world who have conquered unimaginable feats: to mention just a select few, Tori Murden McClure, the first woman and first American to row solo across the Atlantic Ocean; Kira Salak, the first woman to traverse Papua New Guinea and the first documented person to kayak solo 600 miles down the Niger River; Zoë Romano, the first woman to run unsupported across the U.S.A. and the first person to ever run the Tour de France.These women are strong. Smart. Passionate. Determined. They don’t take ‘no’ for an answer and they don’t seem to think twice about diving headfirst into the unknown, solo. What if the way in which we respond to a young girl’s dream about circumnavigating the continent of Africa by kayak deters her from ever fulfilling her potential and becoming the next McClure or the next Romano?Now, this is not to say that we should disregard the statistics and tell women they have no need to be concerned when traveling alone – harassment of any sort is not an issue to take lightly at all. But I think in general, I’d like the paradigm to shift to one that discourages a sense of helplessness, doubt, and overprotection, and fosters, instead, a curiosity for the unknown, the faith to achieve the impossible, and the strength to do it all with the grace of a woman.More power to you, girls.last_img read more

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EMV spawns three strategic changes

first_imgOct. 1, 2015, may have marked the peak of the EMV frenzy as card networks shifted liability for card-present fraud to credit unions, merchants and other links in the payments chain, but there are more changes on the horizon.And they’re not just the looming liability shifts for ATMs and gas pumps. Here are three big changes some experts said EMV could soon bring. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Broome County Career Center encourages job seekers to get ahead of the curve

first_imgJOHNSON CITY (WBNG) — If you’re out of work and in need of help finding a job, the Broome County Career and Community Services Center is now open by appointment only. He says that once federal unemployment benefits run out later this month, they expect to experience an extremely high volume of requests. To schedule an appointment you can call (607) 778-2136. The center is located in the old Sears space in the Oakdale Mall and offers help with everything from resumes to finding the right career field. center_img “As far as making appointments and getting some counselor help we’re ready able and willing to do that. We’re trying to help out in any way to get work done before that tsunami that’s coming,” he said. Executive Director Robert Murphy tells 12 News that anyone looking for assistance is strongly encouraged to schedule a help session with them as soon as possible. last_img read more

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$1 billion worth of bitcoin linked to the Silk Road seized by the U.S.

first_img– Advertisement – While the Silk Road was in operation, thousands of drug dealers and other unlawful vendors used it distribute illegal drugs, unlawful goods and services to well over 100,000 buyers. At the time it was taken down seven years ago, Silk Road had nearly 13,000 listings for illegal drugs and “many more listings” offering illegal services such as computer hacking and murder for hire, according to the complaint. Those generated sales totaling more than 9.5 million bitcoins. The complaint also alleges that the Silk Road used a process to make it harder to track individual transactions of cryptocurrency.The forfeiture could be temporary though. The U.S. still needs to prove its case before a judge before it can control the bitcoin funds for good.— CNBC’s Ryan Browne contributed reporting. Bitcoin has since taken off as a mainstream investment vehicle in recent years. It climbed above $15,000 on Thursday, hitting the highest level since January 2018. The cryptocurrency has more than doubled year to date.This week, London-based blockchain analysis firm Elliptic said that it picked up on the massive movement of bitcoin spurred by the DOJ. The company reported 69,369 bitcoins — worth about $1 billion — had been moved out of a bitcoin wallet, which had the fourth-highest balance of any in the world. Tom Robinson, co-founder and chief scientist of Elliptic, said the movement of bitcoins “may represent Ulbricht or a Silk Road vendor moving their funds” but that it “seems unlikely that Ulbricht would be able to conduct a bitcoin transaction from prison.”The U.S. agencies were able to track down those illicit funds through a unit within the IRS that specializes in tracing virtual currency transactions. The IRS agents were able to identify 54 new bitcoin transactions executed by the Silk Road, which appear to be proceeds of some of that illegal activity, the complaint said. The agency was then able to trace that money to a specific bitcoin address that appeared to have hacked the bitcoin funds from the Silk Road.- Advertisement – Thousands of bitcoins were taken by law enforcement this week, in what the Justice Department said was the largest seizure of cryptocurrency in the history of the agency.“Silk Road was the most notorious online criminal marketplace of its day,” U.S. Attorney David Anderson of the Northern District of California said in a civil complaint Thursday. “The successful prosecution of Silk Road’s founder in 2015 left open a billion-dollar question. Where did the money go?”Silk Road allowed people to buy and sell drugs and other illegal goods, and use bitcoin to anonymously fund those transactions. The dark web marketplace was shut down by U.S. federal authorities in 2013 and its founder, Ross Ulbricht, was sentenced to life in prison two years later.- Advertisement –center_img The U.S. government seized an unprecedented $1 billion worth of bitcoin linked to criminal marketplace, the Silk Road.- Advertisement – Omar Marques | LightRocket | Getty Imageslast_img read more

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Dragan Pujas – from trainee to the new President of the Management Board of Plava Laguna in 13 years

first_imgIt is interesting how Dragan Pujas started his business journey in Plava Laguna as an intern back in 2006, and later, as he developed and progressed in 2018, he became a member of the Management Board. The entire journey from trainee to CEO took 13,4 years. The new President of the Management Board is appointed by the same decision as the current member of the Management Board, Mr. Dragan Pujas, with a mandate lasting from October 01, 2019. In the first six months, Plava Laguna in hotels and apartments recorded an increase in overnight stays by 6,5%. Interestingly, according to sales channels, an increase was recorded in the group segment by 9% with a share of 38%, and in the individual segment by 13% and a share of 35%. Due to the extremely bad weather, the campsites recorded a drop in overnight stays of 1,8%. In total, looking at all types of accommodation capacities, in the first six months Plava Laguna realized 1.43 million overnight stays, which is an increase of 3,2% compared to last year. In the first six months 3% more overnight stays At its meeting held on August 29, 2019, the Supervisory Board of Plava Laguna passed a decision revoking the current President of the Management Board, Neven Staver, from the position of President of the Management Board on September 30, 2019.last_img read more

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This charming Kalinga Queenslander has hit the market

first_img19 Woombye St, KalingaExuding charm, this Queenslander at 19 Woombye St, Kalinga, includes character features such as wide timber floorboards, fretwork and VJ walls. The property sits on an 814sq m block close to the leafy Kalinga Park and Eagle Junction railway and shops precinct, and spans two levels with plenty of space for living and leisure.A traditional gable facade complete with a bay window and neutral colour palette sets the tone for the interior, reached via an external staircase to a north-facing veranda and formal foyer, and beyond, the main living hub. 19 Woombye St, KalingaThe property has leafy front gardens and a sweeping driveway to the double carport, while the rear yard includes a paved patio and covered terrace.Listing agent Wally Boydell described the residence as a beautiful piece of tranquillity. “You will be charmed by this beautiful Queenslander, positioned in a very quiet cul-de-sac with commanding neighbouring homes, on a landscaped block,” he said. 19 Woombye St, KalingaHere on the upper level, lounge and dining areas have a mixture of carpet and timber flooring, high ceilings and large casement windows that draw in natural light. The kitchen is nearby and has a gas cooktop, timber benchtops and ample white cabinetry. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor7 hours agoThere is also access to a vast covered deck, ideal for outdoor dining and entertainment with its views of the green backyard and established gardens.Back inside, the main bedroom also sits on the upper level and is a true retreat with its bay window seat, large dressing area and walk-through wardrobe leading to the central bathroom. Completing the floor is a study or smaller bedroom.Two further bedrooms sit on the lower level, both containing built-in wardrobes and french doors to a covered patio. Nearby are a bathroom and laundry.center_img 19 Woombye St, Kalinga“The double-story home provides excellent family accommodation, with many entertaining options, including separate attractive living and dining rooms for entertaining and relaxation.“Sitting within the Eagle Junction State School precinct, a short walk to the EJ shops, cafes and railway station, this is your opportunity to acquire your perfect peace.”last_img read more

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New Member Joins Chariot’s Board

first_imgChariot Oil & Gas has appointed Chris Zeal as independent non-executive director with immediate effect.Chris has over 30 years of experience working with several companies including British Gas, Cairn Energy, and Tullow Oil.Most recently he was managing director at Jefferies Hoare Govett, specialising in corporate broking and investment banking.Originally, he trained and qualified as a chartered accountant with KPMG. Chris is a director of Ventus VCT, a company invested in a portfolio of companies operating wind and hydroelectric renewable energy assets in the UK.George Canjar, chairman, said: “On behalf of the Company I am very pleased to welcome Chris to the board. His expertise will enhance our decision making and strategic planning. Furthermore, his in-depth knowledge across a variety of sectors, in particular the oil and gas sector, will no doubt prove invaluable as we seek to deliver the company’s goals.”last_img read more

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Franklin County site one step closer to ‘Duke Energy 2018 Site Readiness Program’

first_imgBrookville, In. — Franklin County economic development officials are now one step closer to reviewing a site for industrial development in their quest to attract new or existing businesses, thanks to Duke Energy’s 2018 Site Readiness Program.The 80-acre parcel of land is located along State Road 1 in Brookville, approximately 3 miles from the Interstate 74 interchange at St. Leon.The Franklin County site was one of five locations selected to participate in the 2018 program. The remaining sites are located in Boone, Hamilton, Henry and Vermillion counties.Local officials have received the site development recommendations and conceptual site plans from Banning Engineering in Plainfield, Ind., and can incorporate the recommendations into their plan to support business and job growth in the community.Duke Energy has also presented a $10,000 check to the local economic development group to help implement the engineering firm’s recommendations.“Economic development and job growth are important factors in building successful and sustainable communities,” said Erin Schneider, director of economic development for Duke Energy Indiana. “We recognize our obligation to help local areas become prosperous and more secure to support long-term growth.”“Franklin County is thankful for both the technical and financial resources our community has received through the Site Readiness Program,” said Franklin County Commissioner Tom Wilson. “We rely on strong relationships to help us achieve our economic development goals, and we have appreciated this opportunity to work with  Duke Energy and Banning Engineering.”Duke Energy’s Site Readiness Program identifies, evaluates and improves sites in the company’s service territory for potential large business or industrial development.Ideal properties for Duke Energy’s Site Readiness Program are typically 40 acres or larger served by the utility, or a vacant industrial building at least 20,000 square feet identified to support renewed industrial growth and sustainable development in a community.Duke Energy Indiana’s overall economic development program has also been consistently named by Site Selection magazine as one of the nation’s “Top 10 Utility Economic Development Programs.” Since 2008, the company has participated in the creation of nearly 26,000 jobs and total capital investment of approximately $5.9 billion.For more information about Duke Energy Indiana’s economic development programs go online here.last_img read more

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