Researchers shed new light on schizophrenia

first_imgAs part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify more than 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date.The findings, which are published online in Nature, point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia, and could lead to new approaches to treating the disorder, which has seen little innovation in drug development in more than 60 years.Schizophrenia, a debilitating psychiatric disorder that affects approximately one out of every 100 people worldwide, is characterized by hallucinations, paranoia, and a breakdown of thought processes, and often emerges in the teens and early 20s. Its lifetime impact on individuals and society is high, both in terms of years of healthy life lost to disability and in terms of financial cost, with studies estimating the price of treating schizophrenia at more than $60 billion annually in the United States alone.Despite the pressing need for treatment, medications currently on the market treat only one of the symptoms of the disorder (psychosis), and do not address the debilitating cognitive symptoms. In part, treatment options are limited because the biological mechanisms underlying the illness have not been understood. The sole drug target for existing treatments was found serendipitously, and no medications with fundamentally new mechanisms of action have been developed since the 1950s.“This level of cooperation between institutions is absolutely essential,” said Steven E. Hyman, Harvard’s Distinguished Service Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, director of the Broad’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, and a former director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). “Because of the genetic complexity of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, we need a large sample size to conduct this type of research. If we are to continue elucidating the biology of psychiatric disease through genomic research, we must continue to work together.”In the genomics era, research has focused on the genetic underpinnings of schizophrenia because of the disorder’s high heritability. Previous studies have revealed the complexity of the disease (with evidence suggesting that it is caused by the combined effects of many genes), and roughly two dozen genomic regions have been found to be associated with the disorder. The new study confirms those earlier findings, and expands our understanding of the genetic basis of schizophrenia and its underlying biology.“By studying the genome, we are getting a better handle on the genetic variations that are making people vulnerable to psychiatric disease,” said NIMH Director Thomas Insel, whose institute helped fund the study. “Through the wonders of genomic technology, we are in a period in which, for the first time, we are beginning to understand many of the players at the molecular and cellular level.”In the genome-wide association study (GWAS) published in Nature, the authors looked at more than 80,000 genetic samples from schizophrenia patients and healthy volunteers and found 108 specific locations in the human genome associated with risk for schizophrenia. Eighty-three of those loci had not been linked previously to the disorder.“In just a few short years, by analyzing tens of thousands of samples, our consortium has moved from identifying only a handful of loci associated with schizophrenia, to finding so many that we can see patterns among them,” said first author Stephan Ripke, a scientist at the Broad’s Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, a member of the faculty at Harvard Medical School, and a member of the Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit at MGH. “We can group them into identifiable pathways — which genes are known to work together to perform specific functions in the brain. This is helping us to understand the biology of schizophrenia.”The study implicates genes expressed in brain tissue, particularly those related to neuronal and synaptic function. These include genes that are active in pathways controlling synaptic plasticity — a function essential to learning and memory — and pathways governing postsynaptic activity, such as voltage-gated calcium channels, which are involved in signaling between cells in the brain.Additionally, the researchers found a smaller number of genes associated with schizophrenia that are active in the immune system, a discovery that offers some support for a previously hypothesized link between schizophrenia and immunological processes. The study also found an association between the disorder and the region of the genome that holds DRD2 — the gene that produces the dopamine receptor targeted by all approved medications for schizophrenia — suggesting that other loci uncovered in the study may point to additional therapeutic targets.“The fact that we were able to detect genetic risk factors on this massive scale shows that schizophrenia can be tackled by the same approaches that have already transformed our understanding of other diseases,” said the paper’s senior author, Michael O’Donovan, deputy director of the MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics at Cardiff University School of Medicine. ‘The wealth of new findings have the potential to kick-start the development of new treatments in schizophrenia, a process which has stalled for the last 60 years.”The study is the result of several years of work by the Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC), an international, multi-institutional collaboration founded in 2007 to conduct broad-scale analyses of genetic data for psychiatric disease. One-third of the samples used in the study were genotyped at the Broad Institute, but a total of 55 datasets from more than 40 different contributors were needed to conduct the analysis.The 80,000 samples used in this study represent all of the genotyped datasets for schizophrenia the consortium has amassed to date. The PGC is currently genotyping new samples to further study schizophrenia and additional psychiatric diseases, including autism and bipolar disorder.Core funding for the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium comes from the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health, along with numerous grants from governmental and charitable organizations, as well as philanthropic donations. Work conducted at the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research was funded by the Stanley Medical Research Institute, Merck Research Laboratories, the Herman Foundation, and philanthropic donations.last_img read more

Read More

County Reports 11 New COVID-19 Cases Since Saturday, None At Fieldbrook Foods

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),With 11 “New” cases reported today 9-21-20 (from over the weekend), There are CURRENTLY ONLY 29 ACTIVE cases………How is everyone recovering? ….. Just a week ago there were over 75 active cases…….There has been 613 confirmed cases in Chautauqua County,once again, currently only 29 are active…..Someone please explain…. there is no vaccine, yet people are recovering, PLEASE report the treatments that people are receiving to recover WNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County officials are reporting 11 new active COVID-19 cases in the county, but none at the Fieldbrook Foods facility in Dunkirk as of Monday noon.The new positive cases include seven in Fredonia, two in Jamestown, one in Dunkirk and one in Falconer, officials said.“There are currently 0 active cases among employees of and three active community contacts associated with Fieldbrook Foods Inc.; 82 people associated with this outbreak have recovered,” officials said.There are currently eight active cases among SUNY Fredonia students with 90 people having recovered. There are 258 cases under quarantine/isolation orders by the Public Health Director and they are being monitored. Not all of those being monitored are confirmed to have COVID-19 but have either shown symptoms, are awaiting results, or have risk factors.There are 28 people under domestic traveler quarantine for having arrived to Chautauqua County from a state listed on the New York State travel advisory and two people remain hospitalized in Chautauqua County as of Thursday.To date there are 574 recovered cases; 10 deaths; 613 total confirmed cases and 41,169 negative test results.last_img read more

Read More

Why your plan review needs agenda management

first_imgAs a plan reviewer or building department staffer, you know large projects mean a lot of public input. There’s the significant business community support, possibly the support of your peers in your economic development department and, likely, executive support. Depending on the project, you may need zoning or variance board consideration, city or county legislative consideration and/or other public board consideration.Paper-intensive processes don’t workIt can be overwhelming to track, schedule and publish agenda items to multiple boards and ensure that each board’s staff has the proper information, supporting documentation and required motions. In a paper-based agenda process, cutting across each of these boards, the same data is typed again and again and hours are spent copying and collating packets. If a project happens to be generating a vigorous public debate, you’ll get public records requests from the media and interested parties, and there will be a high demand for the meeting packets.Once this process is decided, and if variances or zoning changes are awarded, your job as a plan reviewer begins. These board meetings dictate the terms for the project, which includes design features and other aspects that you need to confirm in the actual plans. So, over and above the usual review criteria, you may be asked to validate items.How do you get that information? How are those proceedings shared and preserved during review and construction? How easy is it for you to find that information? continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Read More

Prudential in clear for Knightsbridge

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More

Hammerson bid for Grantchester

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read More

Governor Wolf’s Week, October 2 – October 8, 2016

first_img By: The Office of Governor Tom Wolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf’s Week, October 2 – October 8, 2016 October 07, 2016 The Blog,  Weekly Update This week, Governor Wolf announced several economic development projects across the state. He made stops in Scranton, Bethlehem, and Pittsburgh to announce the new projects.The governor also attended the White House Rural Forum in State College where he stressed the need for more resources to fight the current opioid abuse epidemic in Pennsylvania.Fighting the opioid and heroin abuse epidemic is a top priority for the Wolf administration. This week, Governor Wolf also encouraged the FDA to expand access and development of abuse-deterrent opioids as another potential step in combating the health crisis of substance use disorder.Governor Wolf’s Week, October 2 – October 8, 2016Monday, 10/3/16GO-TIME: Centralized Grant System to Streamline, Consolidate Application ProcessGov. Wolf Announces $3 Million in State Funding for Lackawanna College Expansion ProjectGov. Wolf Announces $1.5 Million in State Funding for Ben Franklin TechVentures ExpansionTuesday, 10/4/16Governor Wolf Encourages FDA to Expand Access and Development of Abuse-Deterrent OpioidsGovernor Wolf Announces a New State/Federal Partnership to Bring $28 Million to Help Farmers in Bay Watershed Improve Local Water QualityWednesday, 10/5/2016Governor Wolf Signs Eight Bills into LawGovernor Wolf Pushes Need for Opioid Addiction Resources at White House Rural ForumGovernor Tom Wolf and First Lady Frances Wolf Honor 10 Women as Pennsylvania’s 2016 Distinguished DaughtersThursday, 10/6/2016Governor Wolf Appoints Ahmeenah Young to the Gaming Control BoardGovernor Wolf Makes Schools That Teach Stop in PittsburghGovernor Wolf Announces 57 New Jobs with Relocation of MNG Direct in Bucks CountyFriday, 10/7/2016Governor Wolf Joins Federal, State and Local Officials to Open New Lower Hill Infrastructure in PittsburghHighlights from The BlogJoin Us in Celebrating Pennsylvania’s Robust Manufacturing IndustryOne Week Left to Register to Vote in PA!September Surge: Pennsylvanians Love Online Voter RegistrationLike Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

Read More

Governor Wolf to Nominate Estelle Richman to Philadelphia School Reform Commission

first_img Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced his plans to nominate Estelle Richman, former senior adviser to the United States secretary of Housing and Urban Development and secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Welfare, to the Philadelphia School Reform Commission.“I have worked with Estelle in many capacities, and she is one of the most dedicated and qualified individuals I know,” said Governor Wolf. “Estelle’s experience is unmatched and her breadth of knowledge and grasp of a diverse array of policy issues make her a perfect fit for the School Reform Commission.”“In only two years, I have worked with the legislature to begin to restore the funding that was cut from Philadelphia schools under the previous administration that resulted in mass layoffs and cuts to important areas like transportation, security, and janitorial services,” continued Governor Wolf. “Working with the legislature, I have secured more than $640 million additional for education at all levels, including $97 million that will go into Philadelphia classrooms. The school district is now back on more secure financial footing, but we have more work to do, and Estelle is a solid fit to help me continue my work toward a more robust public education system in Philadelphia that better trains our children for the next levels of education and to enter a modern workforce.”Biography:Estelle Richman is currently involved with several national and local non- profit boards and she also recently worked with the transition teams of Governor Wolf and Mayor Kenney. Prior to her retirement, Estelle was the senior advisor to the secretary of Housing and Urban Development for health and human services issues. While at HUD she held the positions of Chief Operating Officer and Acting Deputy Secretary. Estelle was appointed secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare by Governor Ed Rendell in 2003 and held that position for seven years. Previously, she also served as the managing director for the City of Philadelphia and the director of Social Services. Other positions held by Estelle include the City of Philadelphia’s commissioner of Public Health and deputy commissioner for Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse Services. Estelle is a nationally recognized expert on issues of behavioral health and children’s services. Estelle received her master’s degree from Cleveland State University. Following her master’s degree, she obtained certification as a school psychologist and was licensed in Ohio. Estelle has Honorary doctorate degrees from Alvernia University and Drexel University.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf to Nominate Estelle Richman to Philadelphia School Reform Commissioncenter_img October 28, 2016last_img read more

Read More

Wolf Administration Visits CHOP to Discuss Implications of Affordable Care Act Repeal

first_img July 24, 2017 Healthcare,  National Issues,  Press Release Philadelphia, PA – Wolf Administration Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller and Department of Human Services Deputy Secretary for Medical Assistance Programs Leesa Allen today joined The Concilio family, and Madeline Bell, president and chief executive officer for the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), at CHOP’s Karabots Center to discuss the impacts of repealing the Affordable Care Act on Pennsylvania families and children.“More than 1.1 million Pennsylvanians currently receive coverage through the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance exchange and Medicaid expansion,” Governor Wolf said. “Commissioner Miller and Deputy Secretary Allen are tremendous stewards of the state’s insurance and health care programs and I am proud that they are making their voices heard in support of all Pennsylvanians.”Commissioner Miller highlighted the progress the Affordable Care Act has made in providing quality coverage for all Pennsylvanians. Because of the Affordable Care Act, more than 6.1 million Pennsylvanians benefit from access to free preventive care services, 5.4 million cannot be denied health insurance coverage due to a pre-existing condition, and 4.5 million are no longer subject to annual and lifetime limits that used to be placed on covered benefits. These protections benefit all Pennsylvanians and are not limited to those who receive coverage through the Medicaid expansion or a plan purchased on the exchange.“Since taking office in 2015, I and other Wolf Administration officials have traveled Pennsylvania meeting with consumers and their health care providers who have been impacted by the Affordable Care Act. But for the last six months, the tone of these meetings has changed. They’re scared by the conversations they hear coming from Washington,” said Commissioner Miller. “These people and everyone like them across the country deserve better.”Commissioner Miller urged lawmakers in Washington, D.C. to keep the voices of consumers in mind when considering the law’s future.“Access to quality and affordable health care should not be a privilege. It’s time to remember the people – the parents, grandparents, and children – behind the statistics and focus on actually helping them rather than waging a political battle,” she said. “Too many people benefit from this law every day to rescind the progress that has been made.”Deputy Secretary Allen shared the impacts that changes to the Affordable Care Act could have on Pennsylvania’s Medicaid program.“The proposed bills would limit the federal funding to a capped amount calculated and would provide no additional federal matching to the commonwealth for health care costs,” Leesa Allen, DHS Deputy Secretary for Medical Assistance Programs said. “Over the past five years, our average per capita growth in Medicaid has ranged from 2.2 percent to 5.3 percent, and it’s expected to continue. With the expansion of the Affordable Care Act, we have seen significant decreases in the number of individuals without health insurance. The elimination of funding for the Medicaid expansion would reduce the gains Pennsylvania has made, and more than 715,000 individuals would lose coverage.”Madeline Bell highlighted the importance of the Medicaid program for families served by CHOP and the Karabots Center, which provides primary care services for 32,000 children in the Philadelphia area.“More than 80 percent of our children receive their health insurance through Medicaid; if you’re surprised by that number, you’re not alone,” said Bell. “Medicaid is the largest children’s health program in the United States. It provides health coverage for more than 30 million children – including children with chronic illness, disabilities, and behavioral health concerns. Many of these children have no other options for health insurance.”The Concilio family, whose daughter uses Medicaid coverage to access treatment for spinal muscular atrophy at CHOP, shared their experience with the Affordable Care Act and how it has benefitted their family.“If Claire were to lose Medicaid, we’d lose more than the hope of her ever having a normal life,” said Amy Concilio. “We would lose her. Thank you, CHOP, and thank you, Medicaid, for saving my daughter. Thank you for giving her a chance, and thank you, Pennsylvania, for not taking that chance away.”For more information on how the Affordable Care Act impacts Pennsylvania, click here. Wolf Administration Visits CHOP to Discuss Implications of Affordable Care Act Repealcenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Read More

My 16-year-old son died from Marijuana

first_imgPoppot.org 2 October 2018Family First Comment: Nobody ever died?….“Henry was at the home of a 19-year-old young man, “dabbing”, which is the use of an inhaler to breathe marijuana into your system, making it extremely potent. This 19-year-old took videos of my son Henry both while he was dabbing and also after he passed out; he then let Henry get into his car to drive home. Apparently, Henry passed out again, only this time behind the wheel. Driving through a stop sign, he hit a semi-truck. He would die a few hours later. And my life has never been the same. You can imagine my agony as my state now faces a decision on the November ballot on whether or not to legalize the very drug that took my son.”Less than one year ago I received a parent’s worst nightmare at my front door: a Police Officer informing me Henry had been in a horrific car crash. He died a 16-year-old junior at Ludington High School, full of potential. No father should ever have to bury his son. The cause? Recreational marijuana.How It HappenedIt was the evening of October 6, 2017 (homecoming night!). Henry was at the home of a 19-year-old young man, “dabbing”, which is the use of an inhaler to breathe marijuana into your system, making it extremely potent.This 19-year-old took videos of my son Henry both while he was dabbing and also after he passed out; he then let Henry get into his car to drive home. Apparently, Henry passed out again, only this time behind the wheel. Driving through a stop sign, he hit a semi-truck. He would die a few hours later. And my life has never been the same.You can imagine my agony as my state now faces a decision on the November ballot on whether or not to legalize the very drug that took my son. I implore Michigan voters: please vote no to legalizing recreational marijuana in Michigan.Marijuana is Too AccessibleWhen someone loses a child, you ask yourself, “how can I honor his legacy to make sure this never happens again to someone else’s child?” Some people have said, “if it was legal it would mean less trouble in the world.” Those who make that argument are short-sighted, basing their rationale on their own desire and not on facts or responsible judgment.Medical marijuana is already legal in Michigan but its use is already being abused. This ballot initiative addresses recreational marijuana, allowing every adult in a home to have up to 12 plants. Can you imagine how accessible it will become to children?! In spite of parents’ best efforts, when a dangerous substance is that easily within reach (often cloaked in gummy bears and brownies), children and teenagers will find access. By making recreational marijuana legal – this will increase abuse on this dangerous drug, not curb danger.READ MORE: http://www.poppot.org/2018/10/02/my-16-year-old-son-died-from-marijuana/Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Read More

P700-K ‘shabu’ seized in Roxas buy-bust

first_imgDrug suspects Nemecio Lagayada, Kirtneill Recibe and Michael Abilibit during an entrapment operation in Barangay Jumaguicjic, Roxas City, Capiz on Jan. 8. GLENN BEUP/PN ROXAS City – Suspected shabu weighing about 41 grams valued aroundP700,000 was seized in a buy-bust operation in Barangay Jumaguicjic here,according to Lieutenant Mark Anthony Garcia, team leader of the Provincial DrugEnforcement Unit. “Matunog katama ang pangalan ni Lagayada sa illegal drug trade,” Garcia said. The suspects were detained in the lockup cell of the Roxas City policestation, facing charges for violation of Republic Act 9165, or theComprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002; and Republic Act 10591, or theComprehensive Firearms and Ammunition Regulation Act./PN Recovered items from drug suspects Nemecio Lagayada, Kirtneill Recibe and Michael Abilibit during an entrapment operation in Barangay Jumaguicjic, Roxas City, Capiz on Jan. 8. GLENN BEUP/PN The Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency in Western Visayas said Recibewas listed No. 2 in the drug watch list of the province while her live-inpartner Lagayada was considered No. 2 “high-value” suspect.  They were nabbed after they sold suspected shabu to an undercoverofficer for P1,000 around 2 p.m. on Wednesday, he said. The 45-year-old Nemecio Lagayada, 25-year-old Kirtneill Recibe and35-year-old Michael Abilibit yielded the suspected illegal drugs, Garcia told Panay News. Aside from suspected illegal drugs, a .45-caliber pistol, a magazinewith five live bullets and drug paraphernalia were also recovered from them, headded.  last_img read more

Read More