Room for compromise on immigration

first_imgYes, he has offered a path to citizenship for 1.8 million dreamers, but Democrats are highly unlikely to support his quid pro quos, which would not only crack down on illegal immigrants but also slash legal immigration to levels unseen in decades — a policy goal that was never part of  Trump’s rhetoric as a candidate.The McCain-Coons legislation, like its counterpart in the House, tackles a problem that the president himself has said he wants to resolve.That is providing long-term security for dreamers, whose status and work permits under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals were ordered revoked last fall by Trump and remain in limbo in the courts.The Senate bill would shield from deportation young immigrants who have lived in the United States since the end of 2013 — a somewhat bigger cohort than the one Trump would protect.That difference should be negotiable.On border security, the senators don’t go as far as Trump would like — he wants $25 billion right off the bat to build his “beautiful” wall — but they would direct Homeland Security officials to formulate a plan that would achieve “operational control” of the border by 2020.That’s a term of art, though not a precise one, meaning much tighter security than currently exists along most of the border. Why not sidestep the most incendiary disagreements and target the two main areas on which there is broad bipartisan acceptance: protecting “dreamers” brought to the United States as children and beefing up border security?The contours of such a deal, if not the details, are within lawmakers’ reach.Similar bipartisan bills to that end now have been introduced in both houses of Congress — this month, by John McCain, R-Ariz., and Christopher Coons, D-Del., in the Senate and, last month, by Will Hurd, R-Texas, and Pete Aguilar, D-Calif., in the House.Each deserves a hearing and a vote.Congress is duty-bound to act not only because immigration has all but paralyzed Washington politics, entangled as it is with spending to keep the government running, but also because President Donald Trump’s own approach is a nonstarter.Trump campaigned on building a border wall to enhance national security — fine, let him have his mandate.But the deal he has proposed and is insisting on goes much further than that. Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post:By trying to solve every problem related to America’s immigration system, Congress has repeatedly failed to solve any of them.It’s time to end that legislative dysfunction, which has played on a loop on Capitol Hill for years.center_img It does not preclude building hundreds of miles of walls and barriers on the frontier with Mexico, if that is in line with recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security.The House version of the bill has 52 co-sponsors in addition to Hurd and Aguilar, 26 from each side of the aisle.In the Senate, both McCain, who has long pressed for an immigration deal, and Coons are known for a willingness to reach across the aisle even as they remain true to core convictions.This bill offers a large majority the opportunity to do the same.A broader deal is not within Congress’ ability for the foreseeable future.This one is. More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

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America’s unrest: Why I am protesting

first_img“We saw live murder, there’s no way around it. It’s awful, and every officer should be charged to the highest degree,” she said.”The first protest I made it to the front line on my knees, shouting ‘Hands up don’t shoot.’ I jumped and dodged from at least a few flashbangs from my head. It was very scary at times.”The one time I didn’t see a flashbang coming, it struck me in the arm. I ended up getting a second degree burn from the Minneapolis police department.”Personally around police officers, I do not feel comfortable. I hate to say it but they have so much power in the world right now that it’s scary anything can happen.”I’d never expected things to go like the way they did this week but I’m not surprised. Being black in America, this is what it does. This is how it affects us. It’s sad but this is it.” The mother educating her kids  Michelle Evans, a forty-something who works in marketing, took her two boys aged four and seven to the scene of Floyd’s death, hugging them amid a sea of flowers.Fearing that the protests, which turned violent, were “too dangerous,” she expressed her solidarity and anger at the site which has become a memorial to Floyd’s life.”My boys, just by who they are, need to know that they have privilege, and that they need to be a part of the solution as they, as they get older,” she told AFP.Crying, she denounced the “structural” racism of America.”It’s how our country was founded, and it needs to be destroyed and built back up in a way that brings, equity, and inclusion for everyone.” Privileged suburbanites Jeff Austin, a 62-year-old cultural anthropologist and his 17-year-old high school daughter Lily Henry-Austin protested in the wealthy Washington DC suburb of Bethesda. Large demonstrations are rare in the predominately white area, one of the richest in the country and home to power-brokers such as cabinet secretaries, White House staff, lawyers and lobbyists.”It feels like enough is enough and we really need to work on changing our policing, we need to change our society’s attitude towards race,” said Jeff.”We’ve had centuries to get it right. We haven’t come close yet, but we’ll keep trying.””The more people that are involved in trying to counter the current racist attitudes of the nation, the better. There’s a role for everyone to play,” he added.”As a white woman I have a huge amount of privilege,” said Lily.”It hurts me so much to see people who are human not treated as humans. I just couldn’t sit at home and do nothing. I’m going to be out here until it changes. I’m not going away.” Topics : A week of protests over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, at the hands of a police officer in Minneapolis has rocked the United States.Tens of thousands of people, from all ethnic and demographic groups, have taken to streets in cities across the United States to demand an end to police brutality.Below, some of them explain in their own words why they are demonstrating, their experiences of the protests so far, and what they hope America’s biggest civil unrest in years will achieve.center_img A musician who won’t be silenced Tyqaun White, a 20-year-old musical theory major at Point Park University in Pittsburgh, has been protesting in New York.”It’s gotten to a point where black people are just asking not to be killed. It’s just got to stop,” he said.”We are angry. People are here dying and in poverty every day. And you want to kill us and just tell us to be quiet? No! We have to go out.”We are treated like animals, this is how black people have been treated for years and years.”I understand why people would break the curfew and protest however they want to protest.”We need to protest forever until this system is completely reversed and changed and built upon equality and freedom. I’m gonna keep fighting as long as I have to.” The Latino ex-Marine Hipolito Arriaga, a 36-year-old of Puerto Rican origin born and raised in the Bronx, New York, served as a US Marine in Iraq and spoke to AFP on a march in Miami.”Having served in the military, I thought we were sent overseas to protect the freedom of the people here, meanwhile the police here are treating us like we’re in a war zone.”You are trained to see the people, in Iraq, in Afghanistan, as if they were animals, as if they were savages.”The same way, now here in this country they call us thugs. The president now wants to label us as terrorists for accessing our right to speak, our fundamental human right. “They forget that the country was founded in revolution.” A student on the front lines Kayla Junaye Johnson is a 21-year-old criminal justice student at Grambling State University in Louisiana.She felt “sick to my stomach” after watching the video that captured police officer Derek Chauvin with his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes and joined protests in Minneapolis.last_img read more

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An unused spare room can be turned into quick cash in the sharing economy

first_imgFor John Glann Airbnb is a simple way to make some extra cash from his spare room that would otherwise be empty. Pic Annette DewHomeowners have discovered a way to make their property pay their own way with some raking in close to $10,000 a year.With more than 5100 Airbnb hosts across all of Brisbane, homeowners and renters are making the most of the sharing economy to earn some extra cash.The American company, which was founded in 2008, connects people looking for a room for short-term accommodation with hosts through its website and app.Airbnb gets a cut, travellers get access to accommodation, which is usually cheaper than a hotel, and hosts earn some extra cash.Recent data from Airbnb shows that Brisbane has embraced the sharing platform with listings across nearly every corner of the city.There are hundreds of Airbnb listings across Brisbane.Suburbs closer to the city had the most listings, with Brisbane city having 310, Fortitude Valley having 230 and West End having 250.John Glann jumped aboard the Airbnb train a year and a half ago to earn some extra cash from the spare room in the two- bedroom apartment he and his wife rent in Fortitude Valley.“It’s business so money is a big factor,” Mr Glann said.“At the same time we are a newly married couple and we have a second bedroom, so we thought we would try it and just see what sort of people come through.”The social aspect ended up being a surprising upside to the endeavour, as he got to know people from all over the world that had come to Brisbane.Typically his guests would be young and travelling to Brisbane from countries in Europe and Asia.“We have made friends from all over the world and we learn about different cultures,” he said.The room is rented out for $60 a night, and on average the room is occupied for about two and a half to three weeks in the month.This can bring in a nice bit of extra money each month, but he stressed there was a lot more to it than just having a spare bed.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus20 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market20 hours ago“The biggest thing is cleaning, even if you just have a guest for one night you have to re-clean the whole house,” he said.“You definitely get faster at it, but you have to like cleaning, or at least tolerate it.”It has not all been smooth sailing for Airbnb since it officially launched in Australia in 2012, with local governments and tourism bodies pushing for it to operate in a level playing field with other operators.Last year the mayor of Noosa, Tony Wellington, called for Airbnb hosts to pay a levy to go towards marketing for the area.In Sydney a schoolteacher went to NSW Civil Administration Tribunal after she was banned from listing her apartment on Airbnb.The schoolteacher ended up winning, but the legality of an Airbnb listing in a complicated mix of state laws, council zoning and body corporation bylaws is not always so clear.Airbnb’s head of public policy Brent Thomas in Australia and New Zealand said the company wanted the Queensland Government to embrace the growth of Airbnb.“Local hosts in Brisbane are earning on average $63 per week or $3300 a year with Airbnb,” Mr Thomas said.“That’s hardly a fortune or a king’s ransom but we know it is helping people pay their mortgage, rent and bills.”He said the benefits of Airbnb were going towards the little players like Mr Glann, who used the sharing economy to make a bit of extra cash, instead of the traditional tourism sector “where only the big end of town or the lucky few do well”.Airbnb is growing rapidly and in the last year guest arrivals in Fortitude Valley increased by 76 per cent.Other boom suburbs were Milton, which had a 119 per cent increase in guest arrivals and Brisbane city, which increased by 104 per cent.Despite Airbnb’s increasing popularity Mr Glann did not believe his listing was cutting into the profits of hotels.“I think most people coming through would otherwise be in a backpackers or renting out a Wicked van,” he saidlast_img read more

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Record $11.6m beachfront sale sees owner make over $1m a year

first_img103-105 Hedges Avenue, Mermaid Beach, is a record price in the area for this year.A STUNNING beachfront home in Millionaire’s Row has sold for a massive $11.6m, the highest price fetched there this year.Cotton farmer Alan Frost has made over $1m a year off the sale of his 103-105 Hedges Avenue, Mermaid Beach, property on the Gold Coast.The home sold off market for $11.6m, Michael Kollosche of Kollosche Prestige Agents confirmed to The Courier-Mail.“It was a Melbourne-based buyer who’s moving to the Gold Coast,” he said.“The Mermaid Beach market is just very strong because of a lack of supply available.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoMr Frost had bought the property off a mortgagee sale involving companies linked to former V8 Supercar driver Mark Howard.The stunning beachfront property is a double block that Mr Frost paid about $6.6m for in June 2014 as part of a mortgagee multi-sale involving companies linked to former V8 Supercars driver and businessman Mark Howard.Mr Frost has now gone on to land $5m above that purchase price in less than four years.That’s not a bad run at all considering Mr Frost himself sold out of another Hedges Avenue property at a $4.7m loss in 2014.The current sale at 103-105 Hedges Avenue home involved a three bedroom, four bathroom, six car space beachfront house on a massive 810sq m block. According to CoreLogic, the land alone was valued at $6.6m, with Mermaid Beach seeing its median house price rise 80.4 per cent in five years. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK FREE: GET THE COURIER-MAIL’S REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO INBOXlast_img read more

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EIOPA elects Italian regulator as new executive director

first_imgFausto Parente is set to become the second executive director of the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA), while Peter Braumüller has been re-elected alternate chair of the supervisory body.Parente was elected by EIOPA’s board of supervisors following an open selection procedure, with the European Parliament still to confirm his appointment.He will replace Carlos Montalvo Rebuelta, who, as previously reported, did not seek a second term. EIOPA executive directors are elected for a five year term of office, which can be extended once.Parente joins from Istituto di Vigilanza sulle Assicurazioni (IVASS), Italy’s insurance regulator, where he has been head of the supervisory regulation and policy directorate. Peter Braumüller, managing director at the Austrian Financial Market Authority, has been re-elected EIOPA’s alternate chair for a further five years.The appointments come shortly after EIOPA announced the results of its first ever stress test of European occupational pension funds.EIOPA chairman Gabriel Bernardino is currently in his second term of office, having been offered the extension by the board of supervisors last year due to his successes since the institution was founded in 2011.last_img read more

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Irish regulator urged to tackle risk of master-trust monopolies

first_imgIt also backed the introduction of a solvency framework to avoid members being required to meet the cost of a disorderly wind-up, and argued master trusts could see assets rise to an “excessive” level.“There is a ‘too big to fail’ risk, but will this engender too cautious an approach?” the association questioned.Its concerns about market dominance were shared by the Pensions Council, a statutory body offering government advice on pension reform while considering the impact on consumers.It echoed the IAPF’s concern that the introduction of master trusts, “without strong pro-competitive flanking measures”, would not “automatically” result in savings for members.“In the longer term, the number of substantial master trusts is likely to be small, with the consequent danger of the emergence of complex monopolies or oligopolies,” the Council’s submission to the Authority said.It suggested master trusts be required to publish all fees and investment options in a way that is comparable, and that cost-free methods of transferring savings between providers be put in place.Furthermore, it proposed the regulator learn from the UK’s approach to master-trust regulation, specifically the voluntary Master Trust Assurance framework, and that the collective approach to saving be replicated when it comes to decumulation by establishing group Approved Retirement Funds (ARFs).The regulator has long backed the introduction of master trusts in Ireland and has also suggested it would be hard to justify the continued existence of more than 100 pension funds in the country in future. Its consultation on the future of pension regulation, which closed earlier this month, attracted more than 60 responses from industry, a spokesman for the regulator told IPE.The Authority still plans to submit its final report to the Department of Social Protection by the end of the year, he added. Trustee qualificationsOverall, the Council and the IAPF were largely positive about the regulator’s reform proposals, and the pension association also backed the regulator’s proposals to improve levels of trustee education.“We particularly welcome the acknowledgement that non-professional or lay trustees can bring a significant amount to their role as a trustee and to the administration of the scheme generally,” it said.“The independence and strong sense of looking after their colleagues’ savings that lay trustees have needs to be preserved as much as possible in the system.”The IAPF previously raised concerns about trustee qualification proposals unveiled by the regulator, questioning how lay trustees would be able to acquire the two years’ experience suggested as a minimum threshold.,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to IAPF consultation responseLink to Pensions Council’s consultation response Master trust regulation must tackle the danger of monopolies or oligopolies emerging, Ireland’s pensions regulator has been told.The Pensions Authority should also ensure trustee boards are independent from master trust providers, and that the potential dominance of a small number of providers does not result in “group think” within the market.Responding to a wide-ranging consultation on the future of Irish pensions regulation, the Irish Association of Pension Funds (IAPF) backed the introduction of master trusts – which have proven successful in a number of markets, including Australia and the UK – but challenged the assumption their introduction alone would improve member outcomes.The association called for lay trustees to have a place on the boards of master trusts and questioned whether the costs borne by members would be fully transparent within a master-trust system.last_img read more

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Margaret Mary hosting two blood drives

first_imgBATESVILLE, Ind. — Margaret Mary Health and the Hoxworth Blood Center will be holding two blood drives during the month of July.The first drive will be held on Wednesday, July 19 at Margaret Mary’s Main Campus in Batesville.Donor buses will be parked outside of the hospital from 8:30 – 11 AM and from 12:15 to 2:00 PM.The second drive will be held on Friday, July 21 at the Margaret Mary Health Center of Brookville.Donor buses will be parked outside the facility from 1:15 – 3:00 PM.All donors must be at least 17 years old and weigh a minimum of 110 pounds.To schedule your appointment, call Margaret Mary’s Lab at 812.933.5274, or Hoxworth at 800.830.1091.If you have any questions about conditions or medications which may disqualify or temporarily defer you from giving blood, please ask when making your appointment.last_img read more

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Twisters And Crusaders Split Baseball Weekend DH

first_imgOA at Indianapolis Scecina, 4/13/19Game 1OA          000 311 1             6    6   1IS            000 000 1             1    3   3For OA: Adam Huber 0-3, bb, hbp; Andrew Oesterling 1-2, run, bb, hbp, sac fly rbi; Chris Hautman 2-4, bb; Race Carle 1-5, run; Matt Sedler 1-3, bb, run, sb; Michael Hoff 0-3, bb, run; Riley Schebler 0-2, 2 bb; Patrick Thompson 1-4, run, double; Jordan Stenger 0-3, bb.Michael Hoff  6 IP, 1 earned run, 2 hits, 6 k, 1 bb, 2 hbp    Win; Riley Schebler 1 IP, 0 runs, 1 hit, 2 k, 1 bb.Game 2OA          102 221 0             8   12   3IS            630 200 x             11 7     2For OA: Andrew Oesterling 4-5, 3 runs, double, rbi; Chris Hautman 1-4, bb, double, rbi; Matt Sedler 1-3, run, hbp; Riley Schebler 1-4; Race Carle 2-4, run, 2 rbi, sb; Patrick Thompson 2-3, run, bb, sb; Jordan Stenger 1-3, run, sb.Chris Hautman  4 IP, 11 runs, 0 earned, 6 hits, 2 k, 3 bb    Loss; Frank Moorman 2 IP, 0 runs, 1 hit, 1 k, 1 bb.Varsity record: 3-5Courtesy of Twisters Coach Doug Behlmer.last_img read more

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Chip sealing on SR 9 starting today

first_imgHope, IN—Chip sealing is scheduled to begin on two sections of S.R. 9 in Bartholomew County Today, weather permitting.Work will take place from S.R. 46 to 4.17 miles N of S.R. 46 (near Shaefer Drive, just south of Hope) and 5.58 miles N of S.R. 46 (near Angling Road) to 8.63 miles N of S.R. 46 (near County Line Road).Motorists should expect delays in the area due to lane closures in the work zone. Flaggers will be present to maintain traffic.last_img

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Nani closes on Fenerbahce move

first_img Press Association “I’ve seen all these fans coming out for me and I was really happy. I want to show them my best football. I always do the best that I can.” Nani, capped 86 times by his country, has played almost 150 games for United, but was sent on loan to Sporting last summer as part of the deal to bring in defender Marco Rojo and it has long been apparent that his Old Trafford career is over. Nani told the fans he has heard much about Fener from his international team-mates Bruno Alves and Raul Meireles. “Fenerbahce are a club I have always known,” he said. “Fener is a club that aims high. With the national team I play with Bruno Alves and Raul Meireles and it is very nice for me to come here and feel like I have family. I hope I can quickly fit in.” The 28-year-old Portugal international, who spent last season on loan at Sporting Lisbon, was greeted by huge crowds on Sunday evening as he jetted in ahead of a medical. “I really am very happy to be here now,” he was quoted as saying by the Fenerbahce website. “I see this as a new opportunity in my career. This is an opportunity for me to show myself. I want to be successful. center_img Manchester United winger Nani has arrived in Istanbul to complete a move to Fenerbahce.last_img read more

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