SweetWater 420 Fest Announces Initial 2019 Artist Lineup

first_imgToday, SweetWater 420 Fest has announced the first wave of artists on the lineup for their 2019 event, set to take place from Friday, April 19th through Sunday, April 21st, 2019 at Centennial Olympic Park in the heart of Atlanta, GA.The 2019 SweetWater 420 Fest lineup is led by Athens rockers Widespread Panic, who will perform four sets at the festival across two nights. The initial announcement also includes The Avett Brothers, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Rebelution, Moon Taxi, The Claypool Lennon Delirium, Keller Williams’ Grateful Grass, John Medeski’s Mad Skillet, Turkuaz, and KNOWER, and promises “boatloads more coming early 2019.”The annual event, which is becoming one of the premiere live music events in the South, has made a habit of booking the best an brightest acts in the jam scene and beyond. The 2018 edition of SweetWater 420 Fest featured performances by The String Cheese Incident, Umphrey’s McGee, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Sturgill Simpson, Vulfpeck, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, Greensky Bluegrass, The Motet, The Record Company, The Infamous Stringdusters, Brandon “TAZ” Niederauer, Marco Benevento, Southern Avenue, and many more.We can’t wait to see what other talented artists will be added to the 2019 SweetWater 420 Fest lineup in the coming months. We’ll keep you updated as the additions begin to roll in.For more information on the 2019 edition of SweetWater 420 Fest, or to purchase your tickets now, head to the festival website here.last_img read more

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Scott Metzger, Katie Jacoby, Alex Koford, & More To Play “Tree Of Life Benefit Concert” In NYC Next Month

first_imgThe Sixth “Tree of Life Benefit Concert” will take place at SOB’s in New York City next month on Saturday, February 23rd. The one-night benefit concert event will look to raise money for The Tree of Life Development, a nonprofit which supports housing, job opportunities, and job training in inclusive and integrated community settings for adults with developmental disabilities.The all-star show will feature two main collaborative performances from “Brothers Band” and the “Tree of Life Band.” Both bands will be comprised of notable musicians, with The Brothers Band featuring Luther and Cody Dickenson of North Mississippi Allstars, Jason and Chris Crosby, Alexander Nelson, and frequent Terrapin Family Band member, Alex Koford. The Tree of Life Band will be made up of Scott Metzger of Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, acclaimed violinist Katie Jacoby, singer Elliot Peck, Jessie Bardwell, drummer Taylor Florenth, and Jason and Chris Crosby. The night will also include solo sets.A limited number of 70 VIP tickets for the February 23rd event are available for purchase for a reasonable price of $150, which includes pre-show performances from Bardwell and Peck, in addition to food from the venue and a two-hour open bar. General admission tickets are also still available for a more affordable $65.Inquiring New York area music fans can head over to the event page on Facebook for ticketing and show information.[H/T Fangeist]last_img read more

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Run The Jewels’ Killer Mike Talks Bernie Sanders And Gang-Sponsored Merchandise During Appearance On ‘Seth Meyers’ [Watch]

first_imgRun The Jewels rapper Killer Mike (real name–Michael Render) was one of the featured guests on Late Night with Seth Meyers on Wednesday. The popular musician and television host was on the late-night show to talk about his new Netflix series, Trigger Warning With Killer Mike, which debuted on the popular streaming platform earlier this month back on January 18th.For those who haven’t seen the first six episodes of the new series, its premise follows Render as he explores some of the current social issues in America ranging from race relations, drug usage, gangs, religion, and poverty. Meyers and Render spent the interview discussing what the popular rap artist and social activist learned during his time with the various interview subjects seen in the show’s first season.“My theory is, the more individual contact you have with people who don’t look like you, who are not of your class, who are not of your race, sex, or religion, the greater the chances of building friendships and empathy through that, and then taking it into the greater world,” Render explained, followed by an applause of agreement from the audience.The two entertainers also spent time breaking down the always-interesting topic of “White Gang Privilege,” which Render explained by comparing how outlaw organizations like the Hell’s Angels can benefit off their brand by selling merch, versus members of the Crips or Bloods, who are not offered the same amount of commercial leniency by today’s society. Fans can watch the entire interview in the video below to learn more.Killer Mike Interview – Late Night With Seth Meyers – 1/30/2019[Video: Late Night with Seth Meyers]Run The Jewels will return to Render’s hometown of Atlanta this weekend to perform at the DIRECTV Super Saturday Night concert event alongside Foo Fighters on Saturday night.last_img read more

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Willie Nelson Talks About His First Time Smoking Weed & More In Interview Clip [Watch]

first_imgOutlaw country pioneer and marijuana folk hero Willie Nelson appears on the cover of the latest issue of Rolling Stone Magazine, dubbed “The Weed Issue.” In a video clip shared by Rolling Stone to go along with their Willie Nelson cover story, Willie recounts his first time doing various things, from smoking weed to writing a song while stoned to braiding his hair to trying his own Willie’s Reserve line of marijuana products.When asked about his first time burning down, Nelson responds, “I’ve been smokin’ somethin’ as long as I can remember. I grew up smokin’ cedar bark, grape vines… And then, somewhere along the line, Bull Durham cigarettes came in. That’s where I learned to roll pretty good. So it’s kinda been that way ever since.”The next topic is “Writing A Song While High,” but Willie can’t muster a real answer. “You know, I can’t remember the last one I wrote, so the first one’s way back there.”When asked about his first time trying his Willie’s Reserve products, Nelson reveals, “I have been the official tester of Reserve since its beginning, so I probably tasted it before anyone else did. … I think it’s like sex. It’s all good [laughs].”You can watch the full clip below. You can also check out Rolling Stone‘s full Willie Nelson cover story, “The High Life,” here.The First Time with Willie Nelsonlast_img read more

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An explosion of creativity

first_imgDiane Paulus sat perched on the back of a chair in a basement rehearsal space in Harvard Square on a recent afternoon, watching the scene play out before her like an entranced cat observing a mouse.Suddenly, she pounced.Springing from her seat, the diminutive director stopped the action to emphasize a line, solicit feedback from her actors, tweak an entrance, and perfect the use of a small prop.Paulus was carefully preparing the ensemble for the American Repertory Theater’s (A.R.T.) final production of the year, “Johnny Baseball.”The new musical, making its world premiere at the A.R.T., fuses fact and fiction with the infamous “curse” that surrounded the Boston Red Sox. The plot follows the intersecting lives of three main characters over a series of decades, addressing the realities of racism, and in particular the ball club’s troubling record on integration. The Red Sox were the last team in major league baseball to hire African-American players, only after having passed on greats like Jackie Robinson and Willie Mays.Paulus calls the show a “deeply moving and intellectually stimulating work,” one she hopes will educate audiences about the team’s past while also showcasing a story of love, heartbreak, and redemption.“It’s important for people to know the history of this town 50 years ago, and to be able to understand how we are moving forward from that. This show is not so much about looking backward as truly looking forward.”Looking ahead, often in untraditional ways, while always keeping a keen eye on what has gone before, is what Paulus is all about. It’s at the heart of her mission to “expand the boundaries of theater” as the new artistic director of the A.R.T.After a successful first season, the verdict appears to be a decided mission accomplished, and then some.Fresh from a successful revival of the musical “Hair” on Broadway, the New York native took the helm of the A.R.T. and brought her characteristic kinetic drive to the post, developing a number of bold productions around the themes of Shakespeare and the past American century. The works, many of them highly stylized and unconventional, drew new and old audiences to the stage, and sometimes literally onto it.As part of the “Shakespeare Exploded” festival, Paulus, in collaboration with the British theater troupe Punchdrunk, converted a nearby vacant school into a haunted theater space for “Sleep No More,” a reimagining of the Bard’s tragedy “Macbeth.” Theatergoers donned white masks as they wandered through a maze of transformed corridors and classrooms to follow the chilling action, largely absent of dialogue.Paulus set “The Donkey Show,” based on Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” in the opulent and over-the-top disco era of the 1970s. Glitter, glamour, and a pulsating soundtrack provide the backdrop at club OBERON, the A.R.T.’s theater space on Arrow Street, where the audience doubles as disco dancers on the club’s floor, amid the actors and the action.Included in her inaugural season were Clifford Odets’ play “Paradise Lost,” about a family struggling during the Great Depression, and “Gatz,” a seven-hour theatrical reading of the entire text of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby.”“I wanted to make as bold a start to my time here as I could,” said Paulus. “We took our mission to the mat, which is to expand the boundaries of theater. What is so encouraging is that the audience met us more than halfway on this bold foray into a new way of thinking about theater.”Her work and vision already have paid dividends, with many of her productions generating an almost frantic buzz and attracting countless repeat attendees. “The Donkey Show,” originally scheduled to end its run last fall, has been extended through this summer to accommodate the crowds. In addition, this year the A.R.T. sold more than 1,000 student passes, three times the number of previous years.Paulus ’88 has broadened the theater’s reach in part by engaging directly with the community from which she came, working in tandem with Harvard professors to co-teach classes on campus and during the winter break developing a theater workshop for young undergraduates aspiring to careers in theater.She sees interacting with the undergraduate community as a central part of her mission, calling students “the future of the theater.”“We need to get them to understand that part of the enriching liberal arts experience is the A.R.T.”Music, atypical theater spaces, and collaborations with the University community all play important roles in next season’s recently announced program, which will include the musical “Cabaret,” starring Amanda Palmer of Dresden Dolls fame, and what Paulus calls the rock protest musical “Prometheus Bound.” Also on tap are the opera “Death in the Powers,” a work being developed by the MIT Media Lab in partnership with the A.R.T. that will feature state-of-the-art robots, and a show currently in development that she hopes will operate as a type of theatrical scavenger hunt.“To me, the mandate for every show is that it grabs the audience, intellectually, emotionally, in certain cases physically,” said Paulus. “Next year’s season will definitely offer that exciting range.”To view next season’s schedule.last_img read more

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Radcliffe names 48 new fellows

first_imgThe Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University has announced the 48 women and men selected to be Radcliffe Institute fellows in 2010–11. These creative artists, humanists, scientists, and social scientists were chosen — from a pool of nearly 900 applicants — for their superior scholarship, research, or artistic endeavors, as well as the potential of their projects to yield long-term impact. While at Radcliffe, they will work within and across disciplines.Two Radcliffe Institute professors will join the community of fellows next year. Joanna Aizenberg, the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at Radcliffe and the Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), will lead a thematic cluster in biomimetics, and Nancy E. Hill, the Suzanne Murray Professor at Radcliffe and a professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, will study cultural belief systems and ethnic group variations in parenting and children’s development.“We welcome these distinguished fellows to the Radcliffe Institute and we enthusiastically await the important discoveries, artistic creations, and collaborations — within Radcliffe and in the wider Harvard and local communities — that will emerge during their time here,” said Barbara J. Grosz, dean of the Radcliffe Institute and Higgins Professor of Natural Sciences at SEAS.Now in its 10th year, the Radcliffe Institute Fellowship Program has awarded fellowships to more than 500 accomplished and promising artists, scientists, and scholars. Past fellows include Elizabeth Alexander, the fourth U.S. presidential inaugural poet; Mulatu Astatke, founder of the hybrid musical form Ethio Jazz; Debra Fischer, who has participated in the discovery of roughly half the known extrasolar planets; and Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Tony Horwitz.For a list of fellows and their projects.last_img read more

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Askwith Forum offers exciting guests, talks this season

first_imgAnne Sweeney, Ed.M. ’80, will kick off the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Askwith Forums on Sept. 20 with her talk “TV Tech: The Role of Technology in the Evolution of Creativity and the Viewer Experience.” Sweeney, the co-chairman of Disney Media Networks and president of Disney ABC Television Group, is the first of many exciting guest lecturers this season.Harlem Children’s Zone President Geoffrey Canada, Ed.M. ’75, takes to the forum on Sept. 23 with filmmaker Davis Guggenheim, who will present an advance screening of his film “Waiting for ‘Superman.’” The ticketed event will be held at Loeb Drama Center.Also on the docket: Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC’s “Hardball,” moderates “The Big IDEA: Reflecting on 35 Years of Equal Access for Students with Disabilities” on Nov. 15; and Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow, Ed.M. ’76, discusses her new book “In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark” on Nov. 18.Askwith Forums are free and open to the public. For a complete list of events and speakers, visit the forum website.last_img read more

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No cheeks, no problem

first_imgA Harvard biologist has come to the defense of dogs, refuting scientific claims that canines’ slobbery drinking results from unsophisticated ladling with their tongues, showing that they use the same subtle combination of physical forces and anatomy used by their archenemies — cats.Alfred W. Crompton, the Fisher Professor of Natural History Emeritus, his longtime assistant Catherine Musinsky, and his faithful Portuguese water dog, Matilda, joined forces after a 2010 paper written by a team led by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) scientists described in great detail how cats use adhesion and inertia to literally pull columns of water from a dish into their open mouths before closing their jaws to trap the water.The MIT paper, published in the journal Science, said that cats curl the tips of their tongues backward, forming a large flat area that comes into contact with the surface of the liquid. The water adheres to the tongue as the cat draws it back into its mouth, pulling a column of liquid up from the surface. They bite the top of the column off with their jaws before the counteracting force of gravity can send it splashing back into the bowl.Crompton, who works on neuromuscular control of animal feeding and has conducted studies on how opossums drink, praised the paper when shown its findings by authors Pedro Reis and Roman Stocker. Cats’ drinking techniques, Crompton said, are quite different from the strategies employed by opossums, who extend and withdraw their tongues more horizontally, almost in a shoveling motion, changing the shape of the tip to trap water.While Crompton praised the work on cats’ drinking, a mention in the paper that the technique was different from dogs’ supposed strategy of scooping water with their tongues didn’t sound right and set Crompton to work.Needing a canine subject, he employed 8-year-old Matilda, who accompanies him to work at Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology each day. Though it was the first time Crompton experimented on Matilda, she took to it like a champ, lapping up broth and milk in front of cameras without coaxing.Using high-speed photography and high-speed X-rays, Crompton filmed Matilda lapping up dark-colored beef broth and barium-laced milk to detect what happens with the liquid inside the mouth.“When the video showed the column of liquid being drawn up … we thought, ‘Let’s hear it for the dogs,’” Crompton said.Crompton said the cats versus dogs angle was a bit of good fun and gave credit to the MIT team for their documentation of the lapping technique. Besides clarifying canine drinking behavior, Crompton said, the most significant finding of his paper, published in Biology Letters in March, came from the high-speed X-rays showing what happens to the liquid once it is inside the mouth and why gravity doesn’t pull it back out when a dog extends its tongue for another drink.The X-rays show that dogs trap liquid in grooves on the roofs of their mouths, holding it there with the backs of their tongues even as they extend their tongues for a second drink. The tongues work as a conveyor belt, drawing up water into their mouths, trapping it against the roof of their mouths, and then pushing it back a bit further with each lap. The camera showed that it takes three or more cycles to swallow an allotment of liquid.Though cats and dogs drink in the same fashion, the original misunderstanding may have come from the fact that while cats’ tongues come into contact with just the surface of the liquid, dogs’ tongues plunge in, breaking the surface. This action not only creates a mess, it also pools liquid on the back side of the tongue as the animal draws it up, almost as if it were forming a cup. Closer examination of the video shows, however, that that liquid is lost as the tongue is drawn up, Crompton said.“That’s why they make such a mess,” he said.Together, the cats and dogs studies help illuminate how animals solve the problem of pulling water against gravity into their mouths, Crompton said. Animals that have cheeks, like humans, horses, and pigs, can create suction with their tongues, drawing water in. But cats, dogs, and other carnivores that have to open their mouths wide to catch their prey don’t have cheeks and have to find other solutions, Crompton said.“If you’re a carnivore like an opossum, cat, or dog, life depends on opening your mouth wide,” Crompton said. “It’s an interesting system.”last_img read more

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Climate change on world stage

first_imgInternational climate talks wrapped up last week in Qatar. Harvard Professor Robert Stavins attended and characterized the gathering as a qualified success, representing another step in a long process of reaching a workable international agreement.Gazette staff writer Al Powell talked with Stavins about the work of international delegates and the prospects for a meaningful agreement going forward.GAZETTE: Can you explain the purpose of these talks?STAVINS: In 1992, at a United Nations conference in Rio de Janeiro, a major outcome was the adoption of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Among other things, that convention provided for annual conferences at which representatives of countries would get together to discuss and negotiate how to address the threat of climate change. These annual negotiations go by the name of a “Conference of the Parties,” commonly abbreviated as a “COP.” COP-1 took place in Berlin in 1995, and COP-18 just took place in Doha, Qatar, in December 2012.GAZETTE: What is your role at these conferences?STAVINS: My role is typically on behalf of the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements. Our purpose is to help the various national negotiating teams identify modes of international cooperation that will address climate change in ways that are scientifically sound, economically rational, and politically pragmatic.We hold events to which everyone is invited, two events this time. One of the mandates that came out of the Durban conference in December 2012 was for the delegates to think about new ways they can make use of the market to address the threat of climate change. We put together a panel of people to talk about potential “new market mechanisms.” We had a room with a capacity of several hundred, and every seat was taken. People were standing in the aisles, sitting on the floors, and spilling out into the hallway waiting to get in. In other words, interest in our intellectual contributions was at a high level. Importantly, the session was jointly sponsored with the Enel Foundation and the International Emissions Trading Association, which is a trade association of companies interested in emissions trading and related mechanisms.The second event was co-sponsored with the government of the state of Qatar, and looked forward, post-Doha, to the potential paths ahead, with particular focus on the problems of arid countries, a chronic issue for the Middle East. The panel included Fahad Bin Mohammed Al-Attiya, chairman of the Qatar National Food Security Programme, who is one of the key thinkers and leaders on these issues.In addition, we carry out bilateral meetings with negotiating teams and also do press meetings. Typically, we hold a couple dozen such meetings.GAZETTE: How do you feel the conference went?STAVINS: My view is that these international negotiations need to be viewed not as a sprint, in which you win or lose, but as a very long distance relay race, and the Qataris succeeded in handing off the baton.The Qataris invited us to Doha last summer to help them begin to think about what success at the December conference would look like and how they could achieve it. There were three aspects to what we identified in advance as success, and they achieved all three, though maybe not to the degree or in the way that every country in the world would have preferred.GAZETTE: What were those three?STAVINS: First, they successfully brought to a close negotiations on a second commitment of the Kyoto Protocol, that is, extending the protocol beyond its first commitment period, which expires at the end of 2012. The second commitment period is now set. It will run to 2020. Second, they also brought to a successful close negotiations in what was called the Long Term Cooperative Action track, which included a set of issues that were put on the table at COP-13 in Bali in December 2007. Third, they began to make some progress on the one remaining negotiating track, which is the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action. They initiated discussions about establishing, by 2015, a comprehensive new international agreement, for implementation by 2020, that will include all key countries in the world, including the major emerging economies of China, India, Brazil, Korea, South Africa, and Mexico. That itself is a departure from the Kyoto Protocol, which is focused exclusively on a subset of countries of what used to be characterized as the industrialized world.The negotiators from around the world did not make as much progress on the Durban platform as I would have hoped. But at a very minimum they did no harm, and that’s very important. That is, they did not introduce any problematic text into the negotiations that will later cause problems. In general, my view of these annual Conferences of the Parties is similar to the physician’s Hippocratic Oath: Do no harm, and keep things moving ahead.GAZETTE: In looking at news coverage, I read about two emotions, anger and despair, felt by some after the conference. Are those warranted?STAVINS: AOSIS [Alliance of Small Island States] nations are the most extreme in their point of view, for very good reasons, and they were surely disappointed by the outcomes. They’ve been very vocal, again for good reason. But the major emitters, the only ones that can do anything about the problem — the United States, China, the other large economies of the world, among them — there was recognition that in the real world, this is what success looks like.I think of this as if we’re back at Bretton Woods in 1944, when Europe was in shambles. An agreement was reached at Bretton Woods, but it took 50 years to establish the World Trade Organization, and to continue the process of putting the global financial house in order. The problem of global climate change is actually more difficult politically than the economic problems that the world faced after World War II. We have this terrible situation where those who can reduce their emissions now are not the ones who will be damaged by climate change. You’re asking current voters to foot the bill, while it’s the future generation that will benefit from reduced damage. Furthermore, any country taking action will foot the bill for its costs, but the benefits of those actions — reduced climate change — will be spread globally. Hence, for any individual country the direct benefits of action will inevitably be less than the direct costs of action, despite the fact that global benefits may be considerably greater than global costs. That’s the global commons problem, and it creates an incentive for each country to free ride on the actions of others. So politically, it’s an exceptionally challenging problem.GAZETTE: What about the gap between the emissions cuts that were promised and that have been achieved?STAVINS: What became clear to me at the conference is that there is increasing acceptance of three facts from a broad set of delegations. One was that the frequently discussed target of limiting concentrations to 450 parts per million [of  CO2 in the atmosphere], which is equated to approximately 2 degrees centigrade maximum warming, is simply not achievable.Number two, there’s increasing recognition that a bottom-up international policy architecture is probably the future path forward, not a top-down approach. By top down, I mean a highly centralized approach like the Kyoto Protocol, with targets and timetables, as opposed to a bottom-up, pledge-and-review approach in which each country essentially says, “Look, this is what I can do,” and they put all of those into the hopper.The third thing I observed was that there was greatly increased acceptance of the reality that market–based approaches to emissions reduction are absolutely essential. One heard this in the past from economists and from certain countries, but now it is unanimous, except for the small set of Marxist economies that essentially object to the world economic order.GAZETTE: Where does the U.S. stand on that issue?STAVINS: The U.S. has been at the forefront of that approach back to the Clinton administration. What’s interesting is that the official U.S. commitment under this pledge-and-review approach, a 17 percent reduction below 2005 emissions by the year 2020, is very likely to be achieved.The reason is the combination of CO2 regulations which are now in place because of the Supreme Court decision [freeing the EPA to treat CO2 like other pollutants under the Clean Air Act], together with five other regulations or rules on SOX [sulfur compounds], NOX [nitrogen compounds], coal fly ash, particulates, and cooling water withdrawals. All of those will have profound effects on retirement of existing coal-fired electrical generation capacity, investment in new coal, and dispatch of such electricity. Combined with that is California, which Jan. 1, 2013, is putting in place a CO2 cap-and-trade system that is more ambitious in percentage terms than Waxman-Markey was in the U.S. Congress. Add to that the recent economic recession, which reduced emissions. And more important than any of those is what new, unconventional sources of natural gas in the United States have done to the price and price trajectory of natural gas, and the dramatic movement from coal to natural gas for generating electricity.GAZETTE: Are there things that places like Harvard can do?STAVINS: My view is that the best thing that Harvard can do is to carry out first-rate research, combined with the best possible teaching, and effective outreach to the public sector and the private sector. That’s our comparative advantage. In other words, our greatest impacts on the environment, including with regard to global climate change, will be through our products (research findings, smart and capable alumni, and direct impact on the policy world and private industry), not our processes. The emissions reductions that Harvard will achieve as a result of changing our carbon footprint, for example, whether it’s through increased energy efficiency of some buildings or some other means, are absolutely trivial compared with our impacts on the world [through teaching, research, and outreach]. And all of us — students, faculty, and administrators — have only so much time available. A very important concept in economics is “opportunity cost,” and there’s an important opportunity cost of a faculty member’s time, for example. If they’re working on one thing, they can’t be working on something else.GAZETTE: Isn’t there kind of a living-laboratory aspect to what we’re doing?STAVINS: I agree with that. So the one caveat — which I always mention — to what I said would be if direct actions by the University to limit emissions or energy demand were part and parcel of a research initiative or part and parcel of teaching, then those would be part of our core functions.GAZETTE: Does that extend to the conversation on divestment?STAVINS: I guess the way in which it links to that issue is whether or not symbolic actions are of value, but again you have to weigh symbolic actions against truly meaningful actions.GAZETTE: What’s the most important thing for a member of the public to know about the climate talks and about climate change generally?STAVINS: I think the most important thing to understand is that this is a long-term problem. Economically, a cost-effective approach is going to be very gradual reductions in emissions, not sudden changes. We’re not confiscating everyone’s automobiles tomorrow, but putting in place incentives or regulations so that next time they buy an automobile they move in the right direction, one that is less carbon intensive.A massive amount of technology change is going to be required. That’s long term, and the creation of durable international institutions is going to be necessary, and that’s long term. That’s why that cliché we always hear from ballplayers each spring when they’ve lost their first 10 games — that it’s a marathon, not a sprint — applies even more to global climate change policy.People should get neither excited nor depressed, in my view, over one single negotiation. It’s an ongoing process that’s going to be with us for a long time.GAZETTE: Are you confident that ultimately what needs to happen will happen?STAVINS: I’m not sure that it will happen through a centralized, top-down, international agreement. Nor am I even certain that the core of the action will be through international negotiations. Remember, 20 countries and regions account for about 90 percent of emissions. So there are alternative venues where meaningful action can happen without requiring agreement from 195 countries! One way or another, — through national action, bilateral action, multilateral action — things will be addressed. That doesn’t mean they will be addressed without the world first experiencing significant climate change damages.last_img read more

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Restless legs syndrome linked to increased risk of earlier death among men

first_imgMen who experience restless legs syndrome (RLS) may be at increased risk of dying earlier than men without the condition, according to a study by Xiang Gao, of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Restless legs syndrome is characterized by throbbing, pulling, or creeping sensations in the legs and an irresistible urge to move the legs to get relief, particularly at night.The study was published online June 12, 2013 in Neurology.“We found that the increased risk was not associated with the usual known risk factors, such as older age, being overweight, lack of sleep, smoking, being physically inactive, and having an unhealthy diet,” Gao said in a June 13, 2013 CBS News article. “Through research, we need to pinpoint why and how RLS leads to this possible higher risk of dying early.”Read CBS News article Read Full Storylast_img read more

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