Cancer patients deserve support at work

first_imgCancer patients deserve support at workOn 1 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Employers need to offer support to workers who are suffering from cancer, arecent survey has suggested. Cancer charity Macmillan Cancer Relief said seven out of 10 people workingwith cancer felt it was very important for them to continue to work after beingdiagnosed, as it gave them a sense of normality, boosted morale and maintainedself-esteem. Half of the 165 people polled by Mori said colleagues had little or noknowledge of cancer, its treatments or its side-effects. Despite this, eightout of 10 sufferers (82 per cent) did feel colleagues had been very supportive.About 21 per cent felt their bosses had reacted negatively when they hadtold them they had cancer, with 13 per cent demanding they maintain their usualworkload. The most frequently cited problems were fatigue (41 per cent), anxiety (39per cent) and stress (30 per cent), with loss of concentration, depression andpain affecting a substantial number of people. Dr Jane Maher, chief medical officer at Macmillan Cancer Relief, said,”It is worth remembering that some cancers are curable, and that peoplecan live with cancer for a number of years. Employers’ support during keyperiods such as treatment or recuperation can make all the difference.” last_img read more

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Be at the forefront of the value generation

first_imgBe at the forefront of the value generationOn 30 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Knowledgemanagement and value creation are always hot topics for debate among senior HRdirectors. At a recent human resources forum at Henley Management College thesesubjects were raised again. After much discussion the consensus was thatcompanies increasingly create profit and value in non-traditional ways, outsidenormal organisation structures. It occurs across complex relationship-based andemotional networks. Boardsare slowly waking up to the fact that knowledge assets can be valued on thebalance sheet like any other asset and HR can take a lead with this before ourfriends in finance and audit do it for us.Knowledge– simply a business’ store of information about its people, customers,marketplace and competitors – is a fundamental asset, but it is frightening howmuch companies do not know. They often cannot access the knowledge available tothem. They reinvent plans and activities and do not learn from life out in themarketplace. Organisations like this are flying in the dark. Data, experienceand knowledge resides in the company, but if it isn’t shared then it may aswell not exist.Thisis where knowledge managers or learning directors come in. Really good HRpeople can also help – they know where seams of activity are and they can tap intoand read the pulse of these new networks. It is here that value gets created;that loyalty, commitment and retention gets built or – if not managedeffectively and pro-actively – gets destroyed. Recentresearch suggests that far from organisations being held together from the top,they are actually held together across the middle – first-line and middle-levelpeople managers are critical to the formation and development of social capitaland they are the leaders of communities up, across and throughout the business.Giventhis, we have to be very careful when the call comes to downsize. Typically,done by taking out middle managers in departments or by extracting wholedepartments, this would damage the cross-functional communities within the newstructure.  Thisis an example of how traditional ways of working mitigate against sharingknowledge. A new HR acronym was created at the forum – MOTOC (Managing OutsideThe Organisation Chart) and this has major implications for the effectivenessof HR. Managers increasingly have to manage in the space outside of normalreporting relationships and we need to help them do this. Iam not a huge fan of outsourcing HR, but if it frees up personnel professionalsto get to grips with their new role then I support it, as I believe this iswhere HR can make a huge difference in this value generation. ByChris Matchan, Vice-president, consumer practice at Korn/Ferry International Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Firms take more cautious approach to hiring staff

first_imgRecent high-profile employee scandals have prompted UK companies to becomeextra vigilant when it comes to hiring new staff, according to research. The Elan Employment Trends Report reveals that in a world where businessesare increasingly security conscious, the HR function is becoming a tool toprotect against staff misconduct. More than half of organisations are now scrutinising prospective staff morethoroughly than they did a year ago. References are an area of particular concern, with 56 per cent of companiesmaking more rigorous checks with past employers. A further 52 per cent of the120 employers surveyed are paying closer attention to a candidate’s previousjob role, and actively checking facts with a jobseeker’s last workplace. Gaps in employment are an added area of concern, with 46 per cent oforganisations double-checking reasons for long periods of unemployment. A further 34 per cent of firms validate a candidate’s qualifications and onein five look closely at a jobseeker’s outside interests. Kate McClorey, board director at Elan, said: “References are still thebest way of verifying a candidate’s claims, and we would encourage employers tocontact referees as a matter of course.” www.elanresource.com Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Firms take more cautious approach to hiring staffOn 26 Nov 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Identity crisis keeps DTI at the crossroads

first_img Previous Article Next Article What do you think of the Department of Trade and Industry? It would beuseful to hear about HR’s experiences of the department whose mission is towork with business, staff and consumers to drive up productivity andcompetitiveness. It is all too easy to take a pop at faceless government departments and theDTI has had its critics – from the small business community, to the Instituteof Directors and the unions. And in the past, the HR profession has also beenvociferous with complaints that it is slow to deliver, and that over-regulationcreates too much bureaucracy and stifles development. In this issue, we question what the DTI is achieving, and take a consideredview of its role in a bid to further the debate. We conclude that the DTI ishaving a bit of an identity crisis, and is far from convincing as a driver ofchange or even as a support mechanism for business. Some may consider this a harsh assessment for a department that’s had asuccession of good leaders and some brilliant civil servants within itspowerbase. But the problem lies in the lack of clarity of its role andfrustration over the way it communicates. As Professor Michael Porter recentlysaid, the future is about a collaborative effort between business and theGovernment, not one side calling the shots. HR is on the DTI’s radar screen at last, and is viewed as a vital partner.There are definite signals that Patricia Hewitt’s department recognises thevalue of people management to growing the economy. Several new initiatives –from Porter’s productivity study, to the Higgs report on non-executivedirectors – suggest her team has grasped that HR is critical to thecompetitiveness challenge. The most resounding endorsement of HR so far is probably the latest DTIannouncement of a taskforce to provide solid performance benchmarks andguidance on how organisations can meaningfully account for their human capitalassets. It is disappointing that only one HR professional – Patti Bellingerfrom BP – has been invited to join this working party, but let’s not bechurlish. The DTI is clearly at a crossroads in its relationship with HR, and we watchits progress with interest. Let us know what you think – send your comments,views, and experiences of the DTI to [email protected] Identity crisis keeps DTI at the crossroadsOn 4 Feb 2003 in Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Professional dilemmas

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Professional dilemmasOn 1 Jun 2003 in Personnel Today Can you give me any tips on evaluating how successful an e-learningprogramme has been with the workforce? Expected outcomes should be clearly defined and agreed from the beginningand key performance indicators established. Whatever performance criteria used,it must measure an important business benefit. Dr Donald Kirkpatrick developed a four-level approach to training evaluationwhich captures the key elements to consider. In essence it recommendsevaluating: i) reaction – did the learners like the training? ii) learning –what knowledge skills and attitudes have been understood and absorbed? iii)behaviour – the impact of the training on performance and iv) results – has itmade a difference to business performance? Quantitative data is also useful. How many learners are registered on thesystem, for example? What are the most popular courses? But be wary of puttingtoo much emphasis on completion rates. E-learning is designed to be accessed asthe learner needs it, not necessarily studied from beginning to end. And if youare comparing drop-off rates of e-learning and classroom training, remember itis not socially acceptable for learners to leave a classroom session if it isnot meeting their needs. Test learners regularly via interactive exercises throughout the course. Atthe end they should complete an online questionnaire. Managers should observe learners’ performance back in the workplace. Ase-learning should meet an identified need, the transfer of learning ought to beevident. Wider performance feedback comes over a period of time. It may be apparentin faster production runs, higher sales volumes, improved mystery shopperresults or a higher percentage of accredited staff Focus groups can also be invaluable. Speak to those who have used the course– what did they learn, like or dislike? Speak to those who have not accessede-learning. How can they be encouraged? Staying in touch gives a real insightinto what learners really need and want. Response by Steve Dineen, CEO and founder of Fuel, www.fuel-europe.comlast_img read more

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Pragmatism is key to global success story

first_imgPragmatism is key to global success storyOn 17 Feb 2004 in Personnel Today Depending on the markets that companies operate in, there is a growing needfor HR to cover a larger number of imponderables, however well the businessstrategy has been developed and implemented. Whether it be call centres to India or other parts of the world, allowingcompanies to cut costs from their UK businesses and attract higher-qualifiedstaff at lower salaries and overheads, HR’s input is essential for long-termsuccess. It is vital both in terms of the strategic input at corporate level,and the operational input at unit or geographical level. Even more poignant is the developing or setting up of operations in areas ofconflict, or geographical locations that are suffering from post-war trauma. In these circumstances, there is a need to amalgamate skills from thecorporate centre and operational HR activities, to ensure that those aligningthe business strategy have first-hand experience of the conditions in whichtheir staff, interims and sub-contractors have to operate, along with theirsupply chain partners and supply routes. Only then can strategies align withoperational reality. It is in these circumstances that HR takes on the mantle of a trueintegrated business partner, weighing up the commercial opportunities availableto the business against the risks that may be prevalent in the region – risksthat could ultimately and dramatically affect their employees and partners. To ensure business risks are minimised and staff safety is paramount, HR hasto take on a seriously pragmatic view of the situation, particularly in termsof pre-planning, strong project management at operational and implementationstage, and ensuring processes and procedures are in place, fully understood byall players and strictly adhered to. There is a need to fully analyse the ‘What If’ scenario, and put plans inplace for swift deployment or extraction, which requires a close rapport withall allied or ‘friendly’ forces in the region. To be fully effective, HR needs a seat at the project management table whenthe terms of reference are established for such business ventures. It needs achecklist, such as this: – Where – location and transportation – Type of venture – facilities – Terrain and remit – type and calibre of resources – Candidates – in-house and/or external – Personal profiling – strength of character, self- reliance, provendetermination and technical skills – Mobilisation – to/from and when – Security – resources, on the ground and in transit – Set-up and operation – control and risk factors – Deployment and/or extraction – pre-determined plan and process. Few in HR will have the chance to work in such circumstances. Those who dounderstand the enormity of the task and the personal accountability placed uponthem.By Stephen Hall, Chairman, SMHA incorporating, Performance ConsultingGroup   Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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EU

first_imgEUOn 1 May 2004 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. New rules for new membersHow much more complicated can UK employment law get? Yet another new wrinkle is introduced this month with the accession of 10 additional countries to the European Union. While the addition of these countries promises to offer intriguing new dimensions to Europe’s economic picture and social dynamics, it also complicates hiring issues for UK employers, and adds to their challenges as a sort of deputised immigration officer.Ten countries are entering the EU. But the citizens of eight of these countries will be treated one way while those of the other two will be treated another way.We focus on European issues this month in a special package of stories that will hopefully enlighten you and help you to better understand your responsibilities and your recruitment opportunities under EU expansion. As part of our European focus, we also consider the European Court of Justice and outline some of the previous decisions that heavily impact UK employment.Because of the importance of our European focus, two of our regular offerings – Case round up and From the reference manual – are taking a brief respite this month, but will return in June.With this issue, we also step up our focus on UK industries and employment law issues pertinent to individual sectors. This month we spotlight the construction industry. Over the coming months we will look at UK industry sectors such as retail, travel and leisure and more.Do share with us your thoughts on these and other topics as they appear in Employers’ Law.DeeDee Doke, Editor [email protected] Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Army is major contributor to UK plc

first_img Previous Article Next Article Features list 2021 – submitting content to Personnel TodayOn this page you will find details of how to submit content to Personnel Today. We do not publish a… The British Army contributes as much to UK plc as Marks & Spencer or BP,according to the head of its training and development arm. Brigadier Mark Filler, director of the Educational and Training Services(ETS) branch, said the Army places 9,000 people back into the civilianpopulation every year “better educated than they were when theyarrived”. He said it was the Army’s ‘duty’ to help them get a second career when theyleave military service. The ETS is the Army’s equivalent of an organisation’s training department,with the same overall aims as those in the civilian world. “We see this [training] as being no different from commercialcompanies,” said Filler. “We want a competitive advantage. They wantto make profits, but we want to be successful in the mission and win thewar.” Current projects include the pilot of a new online foundation business andmanagement degree in conjunction with Bournemouth and Leeds Metropolitanuniversities. There is also a partnership with the Chartered ManagementInstitute, which enables soldiers to gain externally certified qualifications. Filler said both initiatives are part of the Army’s aim to develop widerpartnerships with professional institutions, awarding bodies and universities. “At the end of it all, we want the empowered, thinking soldier –someone who can react and respond,” he said. ● For Filler’s full interview, see this month’s Training Magazine. Comments are closed. center_img Related posts: Army is major contributor to UK plcOn 4 May 2004 in Military, Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Wake up HR: it’s time to check dispute policies

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Wake up HR: it’s time to check dispute policiesOn 8 Jun 2004 in Personnel Today The UK employment relations minister pens an exclusive report for PersonnelToday about the implications of the Government’s imminent dispute resolutionlawGood communication is key to maintaining successful relationships in theworkplace. A problem that’s ignored can escalate, and ultimately result in anemployment tribunal, which can be expensive, stressful and disruptive for allconcerned. This is why it is so important to provide a robust framework for employersand employees to handle disputes as and when they happen, enabling tribunals totake their proper place as the backstop for individual employment rights ratherthan being the first port of call. To standardise procedures the Government has drawn up a three-step frameworkthat all employers must enshrine in their HR practice from 1 October 2004. In developing this new structure, we have worked closely with small businessrepresentatives, relevant trade associations and unions, employer bodies, theCitizen’s Advice Bureau (CAB) and the Advisory Conciliation and ArbitrationService (Acas). The procedures are clearly set out and easy to follow. First, a lettershould be sent informing the employer or employee of the reasons for thedisciplinary action, dismissal or grievance. Second, a face-to-face meeting between the two parties should be arranged,allowing them time to consider the other’s complaint beforehand. After thatmeeting, the employer must inform the employee of the decision, and of theirright to appeal. Third, if needed, an appeal meeting should be set up. In dismissal ordisciplinary action procedures this can happen after sanctions have beenimposed. In either procedure the employer must inform the employee of theoutcome of the appeal. Only after these steps can the parties go on to anemployment tribunal. Firms are free to personalise the procedures to suit their own businessneeds. However, I would urge all employers to check their existing proceduresand ensure that they meet our minimum standard, because if a case does end up atan employment tribunal and the minimum procedure has not been followed,penalties will be imposed. For the employer, this could mean paying financialcosts. These procedures should ensure that most disputes are discussed in theworkplace, allowing each party to attempt a resolution of the issue toeveryone’s satisfaction. In some circumstances, however, the minimum standardsdo not apply – if, for instance, either party is abusive or violent. Undoubtedly, these standards are already being met by the large majority ofemployers. This is particularly true in companies that have an HR function,because human resource departments understand the value of good communicationand following standard procedures. But figures show that there are still around800,000 firms that either have inadequate or non-existent procedures in placeto deal with disputes. Last year, employment tribunals dealt with 98,000 claimsbased on work disputes, ranging from problems over pay and conditions, toracial prejudice and sexual harassment. The Government hopes that its new legislation will encourage more opennessand communications in businesses, and we look to HR departments to check thattheir procedures meet the new minimum standard. www.dti.gov.uk/er/resolvingdisputes.htmTo find out about seminars in your area call 020 7731 2288 GOTO www.personneltoday.com/goto/23991By Gerry SutcliffePractical tipsWhat you need to do by October– Understand the legislation: what you need to do and by when– Review existing grievance and disciplinary procedures, andamend them if necessary– Put new procedures in place (if existing procedures do notmeet the minimum standards)– Brief employees– Issue written material outlining the changes– Send off for additional materials, if required– Follow the new dispute resolution minimum three-stageprocess: a written statement; a meeting between both parties; an appeal meeting,if required– Be aware of, and follow, the Acas code, in addition toimplementing the new process– Know where to go for more information Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Talent and Social Business: The promise and the challenges of Employer Branding

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Talent and Social Business: The promise and the challenges of Employer BrandingShared from missc on 15 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today “As some of you know I joined Flipkart with the designation of Director – Talent Branding. Many people after that have asked me what exactly is my role and what would I be doing.”Read full article last_img

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