Alaska News Nightly Monday June 4 2018

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first_imgStories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprnListen nowInterior sees first wildfire of note this seasonDan Bross, KUAC – FairbanksThe Interior’s first substantial wildfire of the season was ignited by lightning last night outside Fairbanks.Seaton files to run as independent in Democratic primaryAaron Bolton, KBBI – HomerHouse Rep. Paul Seaton of Homer has represented House District 31 on the Kenai Peninsula as a Republican since 2002, but he filed Thursday to run as an independent in the Democratic primary.‘Little slice of heaven’ Juneau subdivision threatened by river erosionElizabeth Jenkins, Alaska’s Energy Desk – JuneauThe neighborhood can’t seem to agree: As the erosion gets worse, who should pay for it?UA Regents defer consideration of Haines timber sale planAbbey Collins, KHNS – HainesThe University of Alaska Board of Regents is delaying a decision on whether to approve the plan for a Chilkat Valley timber sale.How hard is it to find an electrician in Bethel?Krysti Shallenberger, Alaska’s Energy Desk – AnchorageA recent letter from the Alaska Village Electric Cooperative startled residents in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. The letter told customers to repair their electric equipment by August or have their power cut off.Remembering our friend, Native media pioneer John ActiveAnna Rose MacArthur, KYUK – BethelOur friend, Yup’ik storyteller, culture bearer, translator and longtime KYUK radio and TV host John “Aqumgaciq” Active died this Monday morning at age 69.Turning a temporary stay into long-term stability, 30 days at a timeAnne Hillman, Alaska Public Media – AnchorageEmergency shelters are supposed to be supportive safe havens. But in Fairbanks, it was a little too supportive. So staff developed a new plan for pushing people out the door by helping them stand on their own feet.last_img

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More unis set to charge £9,000 fees

first_imgDurham University said on Wednesday that it intends to charge tuition fees of £9,000 from 2012. Leeds University and the University of Liverpool have also announced their decision to charge the maximum fees.Professor Chris Higgins, Durham’s Vice-Chancellor, justified the decision by citing his belief in the “life-long rewards” of a degree from Durham University, and the employability of its graduates.He added, “With our plans for a generous and flexible programme of financial support, we aim to ensure that affordability will not be a barrier to Durham attracting the best and brightest students.”The decision has been endorsed by the University’s Students’ Union president, Sam Roseveare, who commented, “competition for places in several subjects is the highest in the UK and a Durham degree is worth the investment.“We will now be looking to the University to fulfil its commitment to providing further enhancements to student services and facilities.”However, the move has not been greeted warmly by all of Durham’s students, one of whom told Cherwell, “I think it’s an awful decision. £9,000 is too much, and students are going to start thinking twice about coming here.”A spokeswoman for the University of Liverpool said that the recommendation of £9,000 fees would be put to a university council meeting on the 30th March, as it “will enable the institution to continue to invest in and enhance the student experience, as well as maintain its position as a leading Russell Group institution for widening access.”Commenting on the decision to the BBC, National Union of Students Vice-President Usman Ali said, “It comes as absolutely no surprise that Liverpool University has joined the ever-growing £9,000 group….The government has completely failed to put any restrictions, or even disincentives, in place to stop universities asking for as much money as possible from students.”Professor Malcom Povey, a Leeds University lecturer and member of the University and College Union, said, “The logic of setting up this pseudo-market is that everybody is driven towards charging the highest fee….Students will make judgements…if the fee is lower they will think it is inferior.”Seven universities have now made the decision to charge the maximum fees, including Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial and Exeter.David Willets, the government’s Universities Minister, had previously commented that the £9,000 threshold would be charged only in “exceptional cases”. The government has warned that if too many universities charge the top fees it may have to cut teaching grants further to cover the cost of student loans.Labour’s Universities spokesman, Gareth Thomas, has calculated that if all universities charge the top rate, the government’s shortfall will reach £777 million.Other universities, including UCL, Bristol and Southampton, are to make their decisions on tuition fees shortly.last_img

City Council Meeting Information

first_img5:05 p.m. Finance Chair McGinn 3/13/2017 An Ordinance to Vacate Certain Public Ways or Public Places Within the City of Evansville, Indiana, Commonly Known as a Portion of the Sidewalk Within a Portion of North 10th Avenue, in the City of Evansville, IndianaBrinkmeyerMarco DeLucio, ZSWSAn Ordinance Amending Chapter 2.10 (Common Council) of the Code of OrdinancesMosby, ElpersJosh Claybourn, City Council AttorneyAn Ordinance to Vacate Certain Public Ways or Public Places Within the City of Evansville, Indiana, Commonly Known as all that Alley Being Twelve (12) Feet in Width and Located South of W. Virginia Street, North of W. Michigan Street, East of Read Street and West of Garfield Avenue, in the City of Evansville, IndianaHargisMarco DeLucio, ZSWSAn Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Transfers of Appropriations, Additional Appropriations and Repeal and Re-Appropriation of Funds for Various City Funds McGinnRuss Lloyd, Jr., City Controller VI. CONSENT AGENDA: SECOND READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONSNo items for Second Reading.VII. COMMITTEE REPORTSVIII. REGULAR AGENDA: FINAL READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONSNo items for Third Reading.IX. RESOLUTION DOCKETNo items for Resolution Docket.X. MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESSA. THENEXTMEETINGoftheCommonCouncilwillbeMonday,March13,2017at5:30p.m. Committee meetings will begin at 5:00 p.m.XI. COMMITTEE REPORTS XII. ADJOURNMENT Committee: Public Works Chair Weaver 3/13/2017 Finance Chair McGinn 3/13/2017 5:15: p.m. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare A.S.D. Chair Brinkmeyer 3/13/2017 RESOLUTION C-2017-04Sponsor(s):Notify:RESOLUTION C-2017-05Sponsor(s): Notify: Public Works Chair Weaver 3/13/2017 5:20 p.m. I. INTRODUCTIONII. APPROVAL OF MEETING MEMORANDAIII. REPORTS AND COMMUNICATIONSIV. SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAYV. CONSENT AGENDA: FIRST READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS 5:00 p.m. A Resolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Confirming the Property Tax Phase-In for Redevelopment/Rehabilitation of Real PropertyMcGinnAndrea Lendy, Growth AllianceA Preliminary Resolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Declaring an Economic Revitalization Area for Property Tax Phase-In for the Rehabilitation of Real Property at 202 Southeast Second Street and 209 Chestnut Street, Evansville, IN 47713 – Kinship HospitalityMcGinnAndrea Lendy, Growth Alliance Committee: Committee: Finance Chair McGinn 3/13/2017 5:10 p.m. Committee: ORDINANCE G-2017-02Sponsor(s):Notify:ORDINANCE G-2017-03 Sponsor(s):Notify:ORDINANCE G-2017-04Sponsor(s):Notify:ORDINANCE F-2017-01Sponsor(s): Notify: Committee: 5:25 p.m. Committee:last_img

FSA introduces salt calculator for craft bakers

first_imgA new online salt calculator has been launched by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) to help craft bakers reduce the amount of salt in their bread.The tool has been designed to help bakers calculate the level of salt in a finished product, which will also enable them to work out how close they are to meeting the 2012 FSA salt targets. It is simple to use, just requiring the baker to enter the amount of flour and salt they are using in a recipe.The calculator has been produced following research carried out by the FSA, the National Association of Master Bakers and Norfolk County Council, which looked at how feasible it would be for the craft industry to reduce salt in bread. The research identified recipe changes “that would allow the production of bread in line with the salt targets”.The recipes were tested in commercial craft bakery premises, in different locations, and using a range of bread-making processes. The findings indicated that these recipes were easy to achieve and acceptable to consumers.”Research also showed that bakers can reduce the level of salt in bread by 25% over six weeks and customers will not notice the difference,” said the FSA.A guide to salt reduction in bread is also available to use alongside the calculator.www.food.gov.uk/healthiereating/ salt/saltcalclast_img

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