Health Center expands counseling staff

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first_imgThe counseling center at the Engemann Student Health Center added six new full-time staff members this semester. This initiative, which began after meetings between President C.L. Max Nikias, Provost  Michael Quick and Undergraduate Student Government  last semester, will decrease waiting times for students seeking counseling.Hannah Nguyen, director of USG’s Academic Culture Assembly and an organizer of Health Awareness Month, said that this is the first step in the right direction.“It’s a wonderful milestone for mental health on campus,” Nguyen said. “The way the counseling center works is getting a little out of hand.”USG President Rini Sampath, who has placed this issue at the forefront of USG’s agenda, mentioned that some students had to be transferred to counseling centers in other areas.“If a student were to call the student counseling center and ask for an appointment, they would have to wait several weeks for that appointment to actually take place,” Sampath said. “These students were being essentially outsourced to these services Downtown and in other areas, and some of them actually said that it increased their feeling of anxiety and stress to actually have to go somewhere else.”Christine Hasrouni, USG director of wellness affairs, discussed how before this recent addition, the total number of full-time staff members — after combining counselors’ part-time hours and full-time hours — totaled 17, a small number for the nearly 43,000 students attending USC. Hasrouni added that this negative assessment of USC’s mental health services is quite impartial.“Members of different universities across the nation, including UCLA, came to our campus and reviewed our counseling center and, overwhelmingly, all of them said, ‘There are not enough counselors,’” Hasrouni said. “They did interviews with the staff and students, and I was one of the people they interviewed, so after that they took it to higher administration and agreed … We need more counselors.”Hasrouni hopes that this new addition will lead to a gradual increase in full-time staff in upcoming years. However, she also stated that increasing staff at Engemann wouldn’t necessarily benefit all groups of students.“One of the problems is that counseling and therapy are very western ideas in general, and not everyone feels comfortable seeing a therapist, and so we have to look at different routes of how we deal with mental health,” Hasrouni said.One solution Hasrouni mentioned is to allocate counselors at the University’s various cultural centers, in order to offer students staff members that understand specific cultural issues. Sampath also stressed the importance of dealing with cultural taboos.“What about access for marginalized communities that have a stigma around mental illness?” Sampath said. “For example, Asian Pacific Islander communities, unfortunately, do not seek out mental health because there is a stigma around mental health, so one thing we are hoping to do is encourage the administration to implement counselors at the resource centers.”Furthermore, Sampath is hoping that in the future, counselors will be available in residence halls to shorten distances and facilitate access for students.“I am interested to see in moving beyond conversations of counselors at the counseling center into conversations about what does it mean to take care of our students,” Sampath said.Sampath said she wants USC to stop worrying about regulations and more about students’ health.“There is one phrase that I really liked that we discussed at the Pac-12 summit this weekend: ‘moving beyond compliance and creating a culture of care,’” Sampath said. “Our university and administrators need to know that it is not just about complying with the rules and regulations of the federal government and American Disabilities Act or whatever it might be, but really asking, ‘Are our students happy and comfortable, or are they excluded from the conversation?’”Viewing the issue with a practical outlook, Hasrouni said that a major strategy would be to better publicize the resources that already exist.“There are so many things on campus dealing with mental health that students don’t know about,” Hasrouni said. “For example, we have the Office of Wellness and Health Promotion. They have wellness advocates, which are students that go through training on different issues like mental health, sexual health and nutrition, and they hold office hours and are meant for peer help … And in that office they also have massage chairs and free coffee.”last_img

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Hardly Manu Tuilagi’s biggest mistake

first_imgBATH, ENGLAND – SEPTEMBER 14: Gavin Henson of Bath looks on during the Aviva Premiership match between Bath and Leicester Tigers at the Recreation Ground on September 14, 2013 in Bath, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) That fateful moment: Manu Tuilagi goes renegade, putting bunny ears behind the Prime Minister David CameronBy Alan DymockTHE BIGGEST mistake Manu Tuilagi has made this week – yes, we have to specify ‘this week’ because, well, he does have some previous – is that he has made himself a political stick with which to beat David Cameron.To make things clear, Tuilagi should not be banned as some are suggesting. You are allowed to mock a member of parliament. Indeed, in our society it is actively encouraged. Propping bunny ears up behind the nation’s leader is ill-advised and certainly childish, but was it a paint bucket or a comedy custard pie?OK, so it was not searing satire or a move motivated by political impulses; he thought he was being impish; one of the lads. However, now he will be a bat with which the Opposition can flog the incumbent government. No support from our athletic heroes, no respect, yada yada yada.Some will argue that this sets a bad example. Taking the mick out of political leaders before an official photo call is neither illegal nor morally objectionable and while his lapses in discipline during games should be punished, taking away part of his livelihood for a set of bunny ears seems silly. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS the centre of attention…again: HensonIt’s silly all round. The guy has given himself a lot of grief and while his actions were downright idiotic, making a bigger deal of things makes it all worst.Of course, silly was the theme of the day yesterday. While the British and Irish Lions where eying paperweights in the PM’s office, Saracens were making mischief of their own by offering fans of Bath full refunds if they attend the match between the two at the weekend and former Saracen and current Bath playmaker Gavin Henson scores a single point.Churlish? Sure. Funny? A little. Bringing issues of gambling to the forefront of sport, again? Perhaps at an extreme push. Certainly mind games come in here and Saracens obviously feel they can cover the windfall, but the punter will not be out of pocket. Japes all round, hey? The thing is that poor old Gav just cannot get on with his job. For once he hasn’t thrust himself into the centre of the storm and really if he puts his head down, gets on with his work and scores some points without making a big deal about it we must all take a chance to admit he has done well.Henson is everyone’s favourite whipping boy, but maybe what he and Tuilagi do on the pitch should be the most important thing for the foreseeable future.last_img

Lessons of the April 1968 Black rebellions

first_imgThe Rev. Ralph Abernathy, right, and Bishop Julian Smith, left, flank Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., during a civil rights march in Memphis, Tenn., March 28, 1968. (AP Photo/Jack Thornell)Following are excerpts from an April 11, 1968, WW article by Workers World Party founding chairperson Sam Marcy, a week after the assassination in Memphis, Tenn., of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.The rebellions which opened spontaneously upon the heels of the announcement of the assassination of Rev. King were so widespread that they had an almost universal character throughout the length and breadth of this land. The magnitude and depth of the uprisings were so great that President Johnson had to cancel his Vietnam conference in Honolulu to attend to the crisis here — a sure sign that, for the moment at least, the war of liberation at home took precedence over the war of liberation waged by the Vietnamese people abroad.It is sufficient merely to remember that the storm of uprising engulfed 110 cities as of April 9, as revealed by the New York Times.Nowhere in recent contemporary history has there taken place such a simultaneous and completely spontaneous rising as we witnessed last week. Its very scope and magnitude send terror and confusion into the camp of the ruling class. The very fierceness and boldness of the mass rising were the only real factors that stopped the government from unloosing as extreme a terror as it did last summer [when National Guard troops were used to put down urban uprisings in cities like Newark, N.J., and Detroit].Nevertheless, in the space of barely three days, the government made 16,255 arrests, left 3,550 injured and 38 dead, all as of April 8.It must be remembered that many smaller cities did not report at all at press time. Many of them generally refuse to release the true number of arrests or injured except on official requests from higher authorities.No matter how the bourgeois press will distort the real character of the events following the assassination, there are two fundamental aspects of these events which cannot be obscured by mere propaganda.The first one is that the uprisings were not of an accidental character, or solely a protest at the murder of Rev. King, but were a general expression of the revolutionary momentum inherent in the liberation struggle. The King assassination crystallized and accelerated the tempo of the rebellions.The second aspect of the rebellion is the implicit rejection of the theory of nonviolence as a method of achieving liberation. The ruling class could scarcely fail to notice this.To the extent that more token concessions are made to the Black masses, they are to be regarded as a by-product of the struggle carried on by the masses, and not at all as concessions handed down from above to assuage the grief of the masses.(It is plain for all to see that the passage of the current token civil rights bill in the reactionary House of Representatives by such a decisive majority is clearly a concession to the rebellions of the past week.)Throughout the entire period until the burial of King, the ruling class so manipulated all of the important public events that aside from the rebellions themselves, there was no truly visible and significant independent expression of the Black masses.Radio and television, press and pulpit, as well as outside gatherings, all of which were controlled by white bourgeois elements, monitored almost all public expressions of political sentiment. Few indeed were the independent, militant Black voices given the opportunity to be heard — except for short intervals and on rare occasions.The very sight of Nixon, Rockefeller, Kennedy, Romney, Humphrey and the other pillars of imperialist racism at the funeral could not help but add insult to injury. The masses of the people were even deprived of having their own way of interpreting the events. No wonder the masses resorted to retaliatory force!In the epoch of imperialist decay, force has been the only arbiter in great events. Not a single important contemporary world issue has been decided without it, and until imperialism is swept off the face of the earth, that is how it will invariably be. Peaceful methods for the solution of great problems as well as small will prevail and endure after the reactionary obstruction of monopoly capitalism and racist oppression are swept away by a proletarian revolution.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img

As Cumhuriyet trial resumes, RSF says journalists must be freed now

first_img“The previous hearings have clearly exposed the completely baseless nature of these spurious proceedings,” RSF said. “It is with the utmost firmness that we reiterate our call for the immediate release of the journalists still held and for the charges to be dropped against all of the defendants in this trial.” March 8, 2018 – Updated on March 12, 2018 As Cumhuriyet trial resumes, RSF says journalists must be freed now News RSF_en Organisation Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit The ideologies of these three organizations could not be more disparate and all three were constantly criticized by the newspaper. The indictment is riddled with factual errors and is based above all on misinterpreted newspaper articles and insignificant meetings between journalists and sources or partners. Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts Most of the defendants have been released conditionally in the course of the trial but three – well-known reporter Ahmet Şık, Cumhuriyet publisher Mehmet Murat Sabuncu and Cumhuriyet Foundation executive board president Akin Atalay – are still in prison and have been there for more than a year. Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor 08.03.2018 – As the Turkish authorities prepare to resume the emblematic Cumhuriyet newspaper trial tomorrow in Istanbul, Reporters Without Borders (RSF) again urges them to drop all proceedings against journalists in Turkey who are being prosecuted for political reasons. Credit: Bulent Kilic / AFP Turkey is ranked 155th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index. The already worrying media situation has become critical under the state of emergency proclaimed after a coup attempt in July 2016. Around 150 media outlets have been closed, mass trials are being held and the country now holds the world record for the number of professional journalists detained. TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Activities in the fieldCondemning abusesProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentImprisonedFreedom of expressionCouncil of EuropeRSF Prize center_img News News April 2, 2021 Find out more RSF’s Turkey representative, Erol Önderoğlu, and the head of its German section, Christian Mihr, will be at the Istanbul law courts tomorrow to follow the trial, which has become an emblem of press freedom violations in Turkey, and to express their solidarity with the 18 Cumhuriyet journalists and administrators on trial. Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law The Cumhuriyet journalists and administrators on trial are facing sentences ranging from seven and a half to 43 years in prison for criticizing the Turkish authorities and for supposedly defending what the government regards as three “terrorist” organizations: the movement led by the Muslim preacher Fethullah Gülen, the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), and a small far-left group known as the DHKP/C. TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Activities in the fieldCondemning abusesProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentImprisonedFreedom of expressionCouncil of EuropeRSF Prize Follow the news on Turkey to go further April 28, 2021 Find out more News (Update 12.03.2018): At the end of the hearing on 9 March, the court ordered the conditional release of Cumhuriyet editor Murat Sabuncu and investigative reporter Ahmet Sik. However, Akin Atalay is still detained. The next hearing will be held on 16 March. April 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img

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