South African brandy named world’s best

first_img28 July 2014 KWV’s 12 year Barrel Select Brandy was named Worldwide Best Brandy, winning the 2014 Worldwide Brandy Trophy Award at the prestigious International Wine & Spirit Competition awards ceremony in London on Monday. This is the seventh time that the South African wine and spirits maker has won the award, and follows its triumph at the International Spirits Challenge 2013, where its KWV 15 Alambic Brandy was named Best Brandy in the World. “To win Worldwide Best Brandy 2014 is the highest accolade and demonstrates our Brandy team’s commitment to innovation and quality of the highest standard,” KWV Master Distiller Pieter de Bod said, adding that KWV Brandy was increasingly being recognised as a serious competitor to Cognac. “South African brandy standards and processes are on par, if not better, than the equivalent Cognac standards, with the only difference being the location from where the grapes that provide the base wine for distillation are sourced.” Distilled in the world’s largest copper potstill distillery at KWV’s brandy cellars in Worcester in the Western Cape, the KWV 12 is distilled mainly from Chenin Blanc and Colombar grapes and matured in small French oak barrels to give it its unique smooth taste. “On the nose there is dried fig, potpourri, citrus and a hint of white chocolate, and it has a great taste with a combination of dried fruit flavours with honey and oak wood, and is well balanced with a lingering aftertaste,” De Bod said. The award judges – including Masters of Wine, buyers, sommeliers, qualified educators and respected wine journalists – said the KWV 12 presents itself as “deep, old gold” and that it has “an attractive nose filled with dried apricot, raisins and spice”. They described the blend as a smooth, refined entry with a good balance of mature notes and some vigour, adding that citrus and some tropical flavours enrich the mouth. They said that vanilla and cinnamon play an important role, “as does the fine, old oak support and long, mellow finish”. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Roach open to Pacquiao fighting McGregor in a boxing match

first_imgRoach: Pacquiao is the most skilled fighter in the world2.6K viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students PLAY LIST 01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast The 38-year-old Pacquiao is currently in the middle of training camp for his fight against unheralded Jeff Horn set on July 2 in Brisbane, Australia.McGregor, who reportedly had submitted his application for a boxing license from Nevada State Athletic Commission two weeks ago, hasn’t fought since successfully defending his UFC lightweight title with a second-round stoppage over Eddie Alvarez in November 2016.Mayweather, meanwhile, has stayed true to his word and hasn’t fought since announcing his retirement following his lopsided victory over Andre Berto in September 2015.Fernandez: Team Pacquiao likes a challenge4.3K viewsNewsVentuno Web Player 4.51 “It has to be a boxing match of course, in a boxing ring, in a boxing gloves and boxing rules,” Roach said on Tuesday during the Philippine Sportswriters Association Forum at Golden Phoenix Hotel in Pasay. “The thing is, Manny is a world champion boxer and the other guy is a UFC fighter. If he wants to cross over, I have no problem with that.”“I don’t think the two sports really match up well. Whoever rules we go by I think is going to be the winner. If it’s a wrestling match, he’ll probably beat Mayweather and Manny but if it’s a boxing match, I think Mayweather and Manny will both absolutely beat him up,” he said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingRoach was asked about the possibility of Pacquiao taking on Mayweather after Bob Arum, who promotes the WBO welterweight champion, told TMZ that the Filipino ring icon will be available if the two fail to come to terms.Mayweather and McGregor have been teasing sporting fans about potential megafight since 2015 with their interminable belabor well-documented all over their social media accounts. Pacquiao sparring partner predicts 7th round KO for Manny4.1K viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession cloudscenter_img Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV MOST READ ADVERTISEMENT Pacquiao happy with conditioning 1 month before fight2.6K viewsSportsVentuno Web Player 4.51 Freddie Roach answers questions from the media after the PSA Forum Tuesday. Photo by Mark GiongoFreddie Roach sees no problem with the idea of his prized student Manny Pacquiao fighting Conor McGregor as long as it will be a boxing match.Roach, the Hall-of-Fame boxing trainer, is also certain that both Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr., who has been rumored to fight McGregor, will dominate the MMA superstar inside the boxing ring.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games NBA: Tony Parker denies retirement rumors, expects to return by January LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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New Zealand PM John Key to visit the Ferozeshah Kotla

first_imgNew Zealand have played just four international matches against India at the Ferozeshah Kotla in 55 years of cricket exchanges and have not won a single match at the historical venue.New Zealand PM John Keys is expected to visit Ferozeshah Kotla Stadium a visit on June 27.So, when New Zealand Prime Minister John Key goes to the Kotla on June 27 he would wish that his visit brings luck to his national team the next time it plays a Test match or a One-day International (ODI) the longstanding jinx is broken.New Zealand have played two Tests and two ODIs and India have won one Test and both ODIs. No Test between the two teams has been played since 1965 at the Kotla while the last one-dayer was played in November 1999. No match is scheduled in the immediate future.DDCA vice-president Suresh Chopra said it would be an honour for the historical ground to host the Kiwi prime minister.”It will be a 45-minute visit, as they have told us. A delegation of the high commission, led by high commissioner (Jan Henderson), visited the Kotla a few days ago to inspect the ground. We asked them to send us a letter giving details of the programme and also what they want from us,” Chopra told MAIL TODAY.”During the visit, Fleming would be playing a 10-minute game with some children of a school the high commission is associated with. The game will be played on one of the practice pitches,” he said.advertisementKey may deliver a short speech while the DDCA may host high tea for the high-profile delegation that also includes the travelling New Zealand media. The Indian media, said Chopra, would also be invited.Amanda Vercoe, second secretary at the New Zealand High Commission here, said that visiting the Kotla was among the options for Key.”Kotla is among a wide range of options we have for the prime minister. But nothing has been finalised as yet,” Vercoe told MAIL TODAY.It is learnt that if Virender Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir, who are recuperating from shoulder injuries, are in town and available on that day, they would most probably be present on the occasion.Chennai Super Kings’ coach Stephen Fleming and captain MS Dhoni.Chopra said Key is visiting Kotla possibly to organise some sort of felicitation for former New Zealand captain Stephen Fleming for his role in Chennai Super Kings’ successful Indian Premier League campaigns.Key, 49, is leading a 25-strong trade delegation on his three-day state visit and he is schedule to visit Agra and Mumbai too.That he has managed to squeeze time out from his tight schedule to visit the Kotla conveys about his love for sports.Key will be departing his country on June 26 and returning on July 1, as per a New Zealand government statement. Besides New Delhi, the delegation will visit Agra and Mumbai.It will be the second visit by a prime minister to a Delhi stadium in less than a year. On July 29 last year, British Prime Minister David Cameron, who was leading a high profile delegation, comprising Olympians Sebastian Coe and Sir Steve Redgrave, visited the Major Dhyan Chand National Stadium and played soft-ball cricket with Kapil Dev on the artificial hockey turf.Among those present were former cricket captain Bishan Singh Bedi, legendary athlete Milkha Singh and the 1975 World Cup- winning hockey captain Ajit Pal Singh.last_img read more

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‘Alexis ran 8km home… after leaving keys in his car!’

first_imgManchester United ‘Alexis Sanchez ran 8km home… because he left his keys in his car!’ Harry Sherlock Last updated 1 year ago 17:38 2/14/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(7) Alexis Sanchez Getty Images Manchester United Premier League A. Sánchez Udinese Serie A The Chile international set off on foot during his time at Udinese, due to an every day mistake Alexis Sanchez once set off on an improvised 8km run during his time at Udinese, because he locked his keys in his car!The Manchester United attacker, who joined the club from Arsenal in the January transfer window as part of a swap deal involving Henrikh Mkhitaryan, spent his formative years in Italy after joining Udinese at the age of 17.The Chilean struggled initially, however, with the physical demands of Serie A, and was required to bulk up to compete properly. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Part of his training came in somewhat surprising circumstances, however, as Italian journalist Pietro Oleotto explained to the Inside United magazine .“Once, after training, Alexis drove into Udine to do some shopping. But he accidentally locked his keys and mobile phone in his car,” he said.”I’m not sure what most people would have done, but he just ran home. He jogged the 8km from the heart of the city to his house in the hills.”Bemused locals saw him in his club tracksuit running and called us at the paper. It was typical of Alexis to turn the situation into an improvised cross-country run.”Alexis’ first full season at Udinese, the 2008-09 campaign, saw him add an impressive amount of muscle, as he played 32 games in Serie A, scoring three goals and providing two assists.“In his first season, he [Alexis] was skinny and stayed on the right wing a lot,” Oleotto recalls. “The physicality in the penalty area was too much for him. But the team needed him more central, closer to the goal, to make the most of his dribbling.“So he began improving his body and they built him an ad-hoc gym. He worked out for two hours a day after training. I remember seeing him halfway through pre-season training camp and being shocked by how much muscle he had put on.”Alexis would eventually play over 110 times for Udinese, before joining Barcelona for a fee of £23 million in 2011.He spent three years at Camp Nou before his move to Arsenal in 2014 and then swapped Premier League clubs before the close of the January transfer window. Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

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a month agoEverton boss Marco Silva annoyed after Bournemouth loss

first_imgEverton boss Marco Silva annoyed after Bournemouth lossby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton boss Marco Silva was annoyed with his defence in Sunday’s 3-1 loss to Bournemouth.Callum Wilson stole the show with a barnstorming double at Vitality Stadium, which was sandwiched in between goals from Dominic Calvert-Lewin and Ryan Fraser.”It’s a disappointing result, of course. We didn’t deserve more after the mistakes,” admitted Silva. “We conceded the three goals so easy. I don’t want to take away the credit from Bournemouth but it was our fault. We had good offensive moments in the game but the way we conceded the goals made a big impact.”We reacted well to their first goal. We started the second half doing what we planned, creating dangerous chances around their box but then they scored from one mistake from a set piece and were clinical.”We have to become again that solid team that we were towards the end of last season and at the start of the season when we had 10 clean sheets in 13 games. We created chances and should have scored more but when you defend like that you are not going to win the game.”It was a lack of focus. We addressed these type of moments last season. We were solid at the start of this season and we need to be more solid again. It’s something we must address as fast as we can. We’ve been a solid team before and I don’t see any reasons why we can’t be again.”Last season we improved our away form from the season before but we want to do better than that. We created problems for them, created spaces but conceding goals like that makes you lose confidence.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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How Tennis Officials Are Trying to Make the Game Fair

Tennis pros, and dedicated amateurs, can control just about everything about their rackets. Rackets are measured for weight, stiffness, balance and head size and strung for peak force, deflection and tension loss. Yet the court players run and hit on will always behave unpredictably. Even at most pro tournaments, players don’t know precisely how “fast” or “slow” a given court is playing, an expression of how much speed and height the ball retains after it bounces. Court speed is a fixture of questions at press conferences during the first few days of Grand Slam tournaments such as the French Open, now unfolding in Paris.“It wasn’t bouncing as much as it had actually the last days on the outside courts,” Milos Raonic after winning his match on Sunday.One reason court speed is such a mystery is that it’s been so cumbersome to measure. The International Tennis Federation has helped develop and test machines that do the job, but the best ones are expensive, bulky and difficult to operate. (The equipment is so hard to transport that many court-surface manufacturers ship samples of their product, in half-meter (1.64-foot) squares of paint and sand, to the ITF’s testing laboratory in London.) For the most prominent ITF-organized events — the Davis Cup and Fed Cup — federation employees must fly with their testing devices, or ship them to sites weeks in advance, to keep hosts from giving players too big a home-court advantage.Now, the ITF is trying to find an easier way to ensure courts are fair. On a recent Thursday at a London tennis court,1I’m not disclosing the tennis court’s location at the ITF’s request, to protect client confidentiality. Jamie Capel-Davies, manager of ITF’s science and technical department, was testing a new device that the federation has helped develop. It’s known as SPRite,2Said like the soft drink; the SPR is short for Surface Pace Rating. The official name for the device measures is court-pace rating, though, as Capel-Davies noted, “‘CPRite’ didn’t have the same ring to it.” and this test was of model number 007.The device doesn’t take a vodka martini. Instead, a ball cannon powered by a bicycle pump propels a ball off the court and through the testing chamber. Seconds later, a display shows the court-speed measurement. The measurement device and ball cannon each weigh about 14 pounds and together cost $12,000, compared to the 110-pound, $45,000 behemoth that sets the standard now. The new devices can be carried by hand, and their dimensions fall within most airlines’ carry-on baggage limits. The motivation for the test, Capel-Davies said, was “democratizing court-pace rating.”3In tennis, democracy is relative: At this price the average hacker won’t be carrying the SPRite and cannon to her local public court.The ITF knows it’s traded some precision for lightness and mobility. The question is, how much? Is SPRite accurate enough to replace its forebears? Capel-Davies and his colleagues were testing it alongside the Sestée, which is the current benchmark. Court-speed rating typically runs between 20 and 70 — and must run between 24 and 50 for Davis Cup matches (a higher number means a faster court).4The court-pace rating, or CPR, is calculated based on the coefficient of restitution (COR), which is the ratio of a ball’s vertical velocity after bounce to its pre-bounce vertical velocity; the coefficient of friction (COF), which is the ratio of horizontal velocity lost after the bounce to pre-bounce vertical velocity multiplied by the sum of 1 and COR; and a temperature-adjusted COR, which is the sum of the COR and 0.003 multiplied by 23 minus the mean ball temperature, in Celsius. The formula is: CPR = 100(1-COF)+150(0.81-adjusted COR). The ITF calls courts with CPR of 29 and under slow, courts with CPR between 35 and 39 medium and courts with CPR of 45 and up fast. The ITF wants SPRite to run within two points of Sestée for the same court.Court speed matters in tennis. During a typical match, the ball will bounce off the court hundreds of times. If the ball typically retains much of its speed, it will be harder to play. That encourages more aggressive play — players will charge the net more often to avoid skidding balls and tricky bounces. A slower court lets players camp out behind the baseline and chase down most shots.Court-pace rating takes into account more than speed, though. The ITF tested the court speed perceptions of U.K. players who were good enough to play for their counties5It’s also tried surveying pros, and gotten similar results, but the response rate was poor. and found that the height of ball bounce mattered, too. The lower the bounce, the faster the court seemed. That’s why high-bouncing clay courts like the French Open’s seem slower than hard courts with the same coefficient of restitution, or ratio of the ball’s speed after impact to its speed before the bounce.6One theory for clay’s higher bounce: The ball pushes granules ahead of it as it collides with the surface, creating an incline to bounce off, a “ramp effect” that leads to a higher bounce. And grass courts, with their lower bounce, seem faster to players than similar hard courts. The ITF formula attempts to account for all this.Once a match is underway, players can’t do anything about the court speed. They play the bounces they get. But players can tailor their training and schedules around which courts best suit their games. For instance, clay makes Rafael Nadal’s heavily topspun forehand shots bounce even higher than on other surfaces. He has taken advantage of this throughout his career by playing more clay tournaments than some of his rivals.For the ITF team competitions, court speed is a crucial part of home-court advantage: Host countries get to choose the surface, which is why Andy Murray had to play on his least favorite surface — clay — in Great Britain’s two away Davis Cup ties this year. (Murray and his teammates won in the U.S. but lost in Italy.)With the currently approved devices, the ITF can’t test the courts at every Davis Cup site, especially on busy weekends when dozens of ties are happening around the world. Instead it audits, choosing to test just a few courts. And at tournaments it doesn’t oversee, including the French Open, there’s simply no official court-pace measurement. (Officials at the U.S. Open and Wimbledon said they test their courts for speed, but the results are confidential.)That makes it tough to assess whether court speeds have changed — one of the goals of Capel-Davies’s department. Tennis players and writers often say — or lament — that pro tournaments are using a narrower range of court speeds than they used to, so there’s less variation among them. Indirect indicators, such as rates of aces or service breaks adjusted for tournament fields, don’t corroborate that impression. The ITF hasn’t tested long enough or often enough to settle the debate. “We don’t have that kind of data,” Capel-Davies said. “I don’t know if anyone does.” The International Tennis Federation uses a bulky steel crate, top left, to ship heavy measuring devices to tournament sites. The outsized Sestée, top right, is difficult to transport, so manufacturers often send samples of their courts, bottom right, to the ITF. The latest-generation device is the SPRite, operated here by Jamie Capel-Davies, manager of ITF’s science and technical department. Its accuracy is still being studied. Carl Bialik Watching Capel-Davies test SPRite in London, it was easy to see the advantages of the new device. He easily carried it onto and around the court, to different testing spots. He also let me try, and within a few minutes I got each test down to under a minute: Take a ball out of a coat that’s lying next to the unit, put the coat back in place, put the ball into the cannon, give the bicycle pump a few cranks, prime the measurement unit, put my foot7We’d taken off our shoes to avoid scuffing the court. on it for stability and press the button to fire.Yes, a coat. Needing something to stop the balls after they had fired from the cannon, bounced off the court and gone through the SPRite, Capel-Davies offered up his jacket to science, taking care to first remove his phone. After each test, the ball nestled in the coat. As we conducted our experiment, Capel-Davies’s colleagues were testing the Sestée on another part of the court. At one point, a Sestée-measured ball got loose and whistled past us.Each court test covered a few different spots, always including ones near the baseline, the service line and the net. The speed can vary from one part of the court to the next. It’s often highest near the baseline because players’ shoes wear down the surface and make it slicker. This court was relatively new, though, so we weren’t expecting as much variation.The measurement process has other quirks. Fail to press the button firmly, and the cannon might not fire fast enough for a reliable measurement. This happened a couple of times to us, so we omitted those readings. Capel-Davies decided when to do that, and it wasn’t a double-blind procedure. He checked with the other group and knew what readings they’d gotten, and was following along as our parallel tests produced results. Still, the quest for an accurate reading seemed genuine. The ITF already had achieved its initial goal of agreement within five points between the devices, which is what a typical player can detect. Then it set its sights on even better agreement, of within two points.Capel-Davies and his team have their own testing lab at ITF headquarters in the southwest London neighborhood of Roehampton, in a converted squash court with the original wood floor now scuffed by equipment. Tennis scientists test balls in a wind tunnel and rackets in a serving machine, nicknamed Goran after 2001 Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanišević, in homage to his rocket serves. The apparatus gripping the racket occasionally slips, and there are marks to prove it on the side of the machine. “We have had casualties” — of rackets, not people, Capel-Davies said.The ITF is surrounded by tennis courts. The Bank of England Sports Centre, which hosts next month’s Wimbledon qualifying tournament, is on one side. On the other is the National Tennis Centre. Many ITF employees play tennis during their lunch breaks. But they don’t have their own dedicated full-sized court for testing. So when they get a gig testing a court, like this one, they often take the opportunity to test SPRite.If SPRite passes the test, the ITF, as its seller, will benefit through increased sales, though that’s not the primary motivation, Capel-Davies said. “We’ve had interest, but everyone is waiting” to see what the results are “before putting their hands in their wallets,” he said.Mainly, the organization would like to enable more facilities, including tennis clubs, to test court speed. Having a device on site would allow clubs to measure the effect of temperature and also to track changes in the courts, to know when it’s time to resurface. A manufacturer’s rating, based on a test of a half-meter-long square patch, isn’t good enough because it doesn’t take into account what’s under the surface, how it was attached and how the court has weathered and worn.At tournaments, organizers could test how the speed of a court changes as players play on it — for instance, at grass-court tournaments, as players’ shoes and shots turn the turf near the baseline into dirt. And they could compare speed across different courts; players often say some courts at the same venue play faster than others, something that affects them if they play consecutive matches on different courts.These possibilities haven’t yet arrived. Our test found the SPRite and the Sestée agreed to within 2.7 points — good but not within the desired range of 2.0 points.8The ITF is aiming for agreement at 95 percent confidence of within 2.0 points. The average absolute value of the difference between readings by each device was 1 point for our test. One location, near the service line, was the source of the troubles: The two devices agreed to within 3.2 points, whereas everywhere else was within the limit.“It suggests something odd happened at that location,” Capel-Davies said. “Hopefully, additional testing will determine whether it was an anomaly.” He hopes that the SPRite model we tested, which was first produced last fall, will meet the target by the end of this year.Even if players at every level knew the speed of the courts they were playing on, they’d still have to deal with unpredictable bounces. Court speed can depend on how long the ball your opponent just served was sitting in his pocket: The warmer the ball, the slower the court appears to be. And standard measurements don’t apply when the ball collides with a hill or valley, common on clay courts.Still, broadening access to the court-speed numbers would help further the mission of Capel-Davies’s department, which is, as he articulated it, “to balance technology and tradition in tennis,” and to “make sure the player won because of ability” — and not faulty equipment or a finicky court.CORRECTION (June 2, 4:00 p.m.): An earlier version of this article said the average agreement of the SPRite and the Sestée in a recent test was 2.7 points in court-pace rating, or CPR, and that the two devices’ average agreement was 3.2 points in one location. Those figures were the agreement between the two devices at 95 percent confidence. The average of the absolute value of the differences between the two devices’ measurements was 1 point of CPR. read more

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Womens soccer set to take on Morehead State and Eastern Michigan

Daniel Chi / For The LanternThen-senior Tiffany Cameron surveys the field during a game at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium.The No. 23 Ohio State women’s soccer team will open its regular season this weekend with two matches, one against Morehead State and the other against Eastern Michigan.OSU is hoping to repeat their success from last season, going 16-4-2, winning the Big Ten Tournament and making its fourth-straight appearance in the NCAA Tournament. It was the third Big Ten championship since coach Lori Walker took over the program.The Buckeyes fell in the 1st round of the NCAA tournament at home against Oakland 3-1 on penalty kicks.Senior defender Megan Fuller, who finished third on the squad with six assists, will return to help anchor a defense that only allowed 14 goals in 22 matches last season. Fuller is one of seven starters returning from last season’s team.The Buckeyes’ biggest hole to fill this year is on offense, after the graduation of star forward Tiffany Cameron.Cameron, a two-time first team All-Big Ten choice and a 2012 second team All-American, scored 21 goals in her senior season and added five assists to put her at the top of the OSU record books with 47 points on the season.Morehead State struggled during 2012, managing only 2 wins, but look to improve this year with nine starters returning to the team. The Eagles are 0-1 all-time against OSU, losing 5-0 in 2005.Eastern Michigan, who is returning 10 starters from last season’s 11-6-2 team, will play their first ever game against the Buckeyes.The Buckeyes won their only preseason match, beating Miami (Fla.) 1-0 behind a 14th minute goal from freshman forward Nichelle Prince.OSU will take on Morehead State on Friday at 7 p.m. and Eastern Michigan on Sunday at 6 p.m. Both games will be played at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

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Juventus plot a late swoop for PSGs Adrien Rabiot

first_imgJuventus are reportedly plotting a late move for Paris Saint-Germain midfielder Adrien RabiotThe Frenchman has under 12 months remaining on his current deal at PSG and has yet to agree on a new contract extension.The likes of Barcelona and Liverpool have been keeping tabs of Rabiot’s situation at the Parc des Princes.But the Daily Mirror reports that Juventus plan to beat both of their European rivals to Rabiot’s signature before today’s Italian transfer deadline.Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.With midfielder Claudio Marchisio having left the club after 25-years earlier this morning, Juventus have now view Rabiot as an option to replace the Italian.Previously, PSG boss Thomas Tuchel had admitted that Rabiot could leave the club before the end of the French transfer window.Although the German does hope to retain him ahead of his debut campaign in charge of the Ligue 1 giants.Rabiot has made 209 appearances for PSG in his eight years at the club.last_img read more

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Allan revels in important Napoli victory

first_imgAllan claims the comeback victory Genoa 2-1 at Marassi is worth more than three points for Napoli in the pouring rain.Napoli were behind courtesy of a Christian Kouame header when play was halted at the 59th minute for a waterlogged pitch.When it resumed, Goals from Fabian Ruiz and Davide Biraschi(O.G) completely turned the tie around to secure victory for the Naples side.“Considering how the victory arrived, it’s worth even more than three points,” Allan told Football Italia.Top 5 Serie A players to watch for next weekend’s activity Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Top 5 players to watch in Serie A next…“It was a hard-fought win in a really difficult arena, even more difficult to play in today with the atmospheric conditions.“We won and that’s the important thing, we can go into the break for international duty with more confidence.”Juventus visit Milan tomorrow evening, while Inter have a tricky trip to Atalanta, so it could be a very positive round for Napoli.“I’m sure Milan-Juve will be entertaining to watch, but we mustn’t think about it too much. There’s a long way to go, we must focus on ourselves and look forward.”last_img read more

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