Ohio Soybean Council announces Board of Trustees election

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Soybean Council (OSC) Board of Trustees has five district seats up for election this year. All eligible candidates interested in running for the OSC Board must obtain at least 15 valid signatures on the petition available at www.soyohio.org.OSC is the Qualified State Soybean Board for Ohio and manages state soybean checkoff dollars. The OSC Board is made up of farmer volunteers who direct the investments of checkoff dollars to improve the profitability of Ohio soybean farmers.Districts up for election are:District 1: Fulton, Henry, Lucas, and Williams Counties incumbent Todd Hesterman is eligible to run for another termDistrict 2: Erie, Ottawa, Sandusky, and Wood Counties incumbent Nathan Eckel is eligible to run for another termDistrict 5: Allen, Hancock, and Putnam Counties incumbent Bill Bateson is eligible to run for another termDistrict 9: Delaware, Marion, Morrow, and Union Counties incumbent Bret Davis is term-limitedDistrict 13: Adams, Brown, Clermont, Clinton, Highland, and Warren Counties incumbent Amy Sigg Davis is term-limitedAll petitions must be submitted to the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) by mail, and must be postmarked no later than July 6, and received by ODA no later than July 13, 2018. To be eligible for election to the OSC Board, you must live in a county in the districts listed, and be a soybean producer engaged in the growing of soybeans in the State of Ohio, who owns or shares the ownership and risk of loss of soybeans at any time during the three year period immediately preceding November 15 of the current year.  Eligible producers who have contributed to the soybean checkoff and have submitted a petition with the signatures of 15 other eligible soybean producers who reside in the respective district shall be determined by ODA as candidates for election. OSC Trustees serve one term of three years, and may be elected to serve up to three consecutive terms.For questions, please contact Kirk Merritt, OSC Executive Director, at [email protected]last_img read more

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How Ads In Mobile Apps Could Send Facebook’s Revenue Soaring

first_imgRelated Posts dan rowinski What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … The Platform is a regular column by mobile editor Dan Rowinski. Ubiquitous computing, ambient intelligence and pervasive networks are changing the way humans interact with everything.Amid all of Mark Zuckerberg’s iconoclasm Wednesday at Facebook’s F8 developer conference, it was easy to miss the biggest news for the company—and the mobile world it hopes to dominate.Yes, throwing out Facebook’s “move fast and break things” philosophy is significant, as is anonymous login. But of far more financial consequence, both for Facebook and the developers it courted at F8, is the Facebook Audience Network.Facebook May Finally Have A Google-Like Ad ProductIt may well prove to be the equivalent of Google’s AdWords and AdSense products. On their face, when Google introduced them, they seemed like simple tools for buying targeted ads (AdWords, in 2000) and placing them on other websites (AdSense, in 2003). But they proved to be powerful financial engines, ones that still fuel the company’s growth more than a decade later.The Facebook Audience Network—Facebook’s new advertising product—could be the biggest idea that the social network has ever produced. While it failed to reinvent advertising on the desktop, where Google dominates, Facebook has a shot at doing so in mobile.It’s easy to overlook developments in advertising and marketing technology. On a day-to-day basis, the only people who really care about it are advertisers, publishers, and the companies building advertising technology. I’ve purposefully avoided writing about ad tech for years, because, to be quite honest, nobody really gives a damn.Quick Thought: Facebook App-Linking The CompetitionThe other news that has people talking from F8 yesterday is the company’s new “App Links” proposal. Essentially, Facebook is trying to create the same type of linking URL structure for mobile apps on iOS and Android that has long existed on the Web.First, we must acknowledge that links between apps has definitely been a problem for developers. Mobile leads itself to a fragmented Web where apps function as their own little individual fiefdoms, not connected to the outside world or each other. App Links wants to solve that.But, as Jay Yarow from Business Insider correctly points out, why would Apple and Google just let Facebook waltz in to become the de facto middleware for mobile app developers? Facebook wants to control the pipes between mobile apps (like it does on the Web), but Google and Apple have far more control over their own operating systems than they do on the Web.With Google I/O and Apple’s WWDC coming up soon, we may see the platform operators crush Facebook’s dream of App Links before it even takes off. Only a strong embrace by developers, whom Apple and Google desperately want to please, will give App Links a shot.But here I am, writing about ad tech on The Platform for the second time in a week. Why? Because we are beginning to see an epochal shift in how advertisers handle mobile. With its Audience Network, Facebook has launched an economic engine that could make a huge difference for the company’s own revenues and the bottom lines of app publishers, brands, and advertisers. As noted in The Platform earlier this week, programmatic ad buying mixed with contextual computing is beginning to turn mobile advertising into a viable medium. Facebook knows more about its users than just about any other company outside of Google—and arguably more, since Google’s efforts to force its users to log in via Google+ have met resistance, while Facebook’s users are always logged in. Facebook Ads, Off FacebookFacebook will now be able to sell personalized, targeted ads off of Facebook and into the rest of the mobile application ecosystem. The goal of the Audience Network is to provide a way to monetize apps across iOS, Android, and soon Windows Phone. Just as Facebook moved to spread itself across the Web with Facebook Login and the “Like” button, it’s now doing the same for mobile—with advertising dollars as the lure. The dirty secret of Facebook’s advertising business to date is that social advertising, which it launched to much fanfare in 2007, hasn’t paid off. Instead, it has succeeded mostly through its unprecedented scale. Advertisers can’t ignore its 1.28 billion monthly active users, which produced nearly $8 billion in revenues in 2013. It is still growing quickly: It pulled in $2.5 billion in the first quarter of this year and is solidly profitable. Yet while Facebook holds its place in the pantheon of Internet giants, its revenue and employee base are actually quite small compared to the likes of Google or Amazon, which made $15.4 billion and $19.74 billion last quarter respectively.To put it in perspective, Facebook is just a little bigger than Google was in 2005, a year after the search company’s IPO. That’s when Google’s maturing advertising technologies really started printing money, adding $4.5 billion in revenues in 2006, $6 billion in 2007, and $5 billion in 2008.Facebook has the opportunity to take advantage of the new mobile era of computing to build its own dollar-stacking empire, if everything falls into place.Consider that Facebook’s own mobile ad revenue, generated through its own apps, was about $1.33 billion in the first quarter of 2014, about 59% of its total advertising revenue. Just a few years ago, that number was zero: Facebook didn’t sell ads on mobile at all. The Audience Network could take that mobile revenue to the next level.Quote Of The Day: “This is a world where people eschew sex to write a programming language for orangutans. All programmers are forcing their brains to do things brains were never meant to do in a situation they can never make better, ten to fifteen hours a day, five to seven days a week, and every one of them is slowly going mad.” ~ Author Peter Welch in a brilliant essay dubbed “Programming Sucks” on StillDrinking.org.Advertisers, developers, brands and publishers—basically, every stakeholder in the advertising game—have long waited for Facebook to make the move to bring its advertising off its own platform and into the rest of the connected world. The Audience Network does not invade the Web, as of yet, which is likely wise: Why take on Google in its stronghold, when Facebook can dominate a faster-growing business?The potential could be profound. As of yet, no company has fully cracked the realm of mobile advertising to reap the type of profits that Google’s AdWords eureka brought it on the Web. There’s a lot to like here. Photo of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg by Selena Larson for ReadWrite Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementcenter_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Tags:#app development#App Links#Facebook#Google#Mobile Ads#mobile advertising#Monetization#programmers#smartphones#tablets#The Platform The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

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Barcelona through to Champions League last 16 despite Icardi leveller

first_imgMilan, Nov 7 (AFP) Barcelona qualified for the knockout stage of the Champions League despite Mauro Icardi snatching a late 1-1 draw for Inter Milan at the San Siro on Tuesday. Ice cold Icardi struck with his first shot of the match in the 87th minute to grab a draw from a match Barcelona dominated from the start, just four minutes after a neat curling strike from substitute Malcom gave the away side a fully deserved lead. “We played the best team in the world and they scored a typical Barcelona goal, but we never gave up, we kept fighting,” Icardi told Sky Sport Italia. “We didn’t give up after they scored and fortunately the ball bounced to me… there was a bit of luck that the ball arrived there.” The Argentine pounced in a goalmouth scramble, spinning and firing home from close range, and rewarding a brilliant performance from keeper Samir Handanovic that kept Inter in a game they in which they struggled to get a foothold. “We could not clear a silly ball inside the area and we paid for it,” said Barca midfielder Sergio Busquets. “I think we have deserved more. we were more ambitious and we dominated the whole game.” – Dominance – ============= Barca, without injured Lionel Messi, were left to lament throwing away three points from a game in which they created more than enough chances to win but couldn’t get past the superb Slovenia international in the Inter goal. “I think Barcelona played far better than us and we could’ve done more. They came forward too easily in the first half and when you leave them possession constantly, you are going to be pinned back,” said Handanovic.advertisement Barca were on the front foot from kick-off and Ousmane Dembele forced Handanovic into the first of a series of fine saves with a sharp curling strike just a minute into the game. That dominance continued throughout the almost the entire match as Barca had almost complete command of the ball and goalscoring chances, Inter’s best opportunity before Icardi’s leveller coming in the 19th minute when Kwadwo Asamoah flashed over Ivan Perisic’s low cross. Inter struggled to string passes together under the weight of Barca’s pressing, and Handanovic had to be at his best to stop fine efforts from Luis Suarez and former Inter player Philippe Coutinho putting the away side ahead before the break. The Slovenia international made his best save just before the hour mark when he charged out to block Ivan Rakitic’s shot as the Croatian bore down on goal. He was eventually beaten just as it looked like he was going to save Inter from conceding so many chances, Malcom scampering down the right in the 83rd minute before ripping home a shot between two Inter players. But his saves kept the hosts in the game right until the end, and Icardi took the one chance he had to save a point. “We just switched off a bit in the final moments,” said Barca coach Ernesto Valverde. “We know that Inter have picked up a lot of points in the last minutes. “But we’re happy because our main goal of qualifying is achieved. The one that’s left is for us to get first place.” (AFP) ATATlast_img read more

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10 months agoREVEALED: Why Klopp and Liverpool passed on Pulisic

first_imgREVEALED: Why Klopp and Liverpool passed on Pulisicby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp chose to pass on signing Christian Pulisic due to the form of Xherdan Shaqiri.Chelsea have signed the Borussia Dortmund winger for £58m in the last 24 hours.And the Liverpool Echo says the reality is that Liverpool haven’t seriously considered a move for Pulisic since they bought Shaqiri for £12.5million last summer.The Swiss attacker was the Pulisic alternative and he was snapped up at an absolute bargain price. Shaqiri has proved to be a massive hit at Anfield. The 27-year-old has only started 11 matches for the Reds but has already chipped in with six goals, including a match-winning double against Manchester United.Pulisic is still more potential than proven quality having scored 15 goals in 115 games for Dortmund. He has only netted three times in 18 club appearances so far this term.The size of the fee was also prohibitive. Liverpool wouldn’t buy a squad player for £58million and they certainly wouldn’t pay that for a squad player who had less than 18 months remaining on his contract. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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How Tennis Officials Are Trying to Make the Game Fair

Tennis pros, and dedicated amateurs, can control just about everything about their rackets. Rackets are measured for weight, stiffness, balance and head size and strung for peak force, deflection and tension loss. Yet the court players run and hit on will always behave unpredictably. Even at most pro tournaments, players don’t know precisely how “fast” or “slow” a given court is playing, an expression of how much speed and height the ball retains after it bounces. Court speed is a fixture of questions at press conferences during the first few days of Grand Slam tournaments such as the French Open, now unfolding in Paris.“It wasn’t bouncing as much as it had actually the last days on the outside courts,” Milos Raonic after winning his match on Sunday.One reason court speed is such a mystery is that it’s been so cumbersome to measure. The International Tennis Federation has helped develop and test machines that do the job, but the best ones are expensive, bulky and difficult to operate. (The equipment is so hard to transport that many court-surface manufacturers ship samples of their product, in half-meter (1.64-foot) squares of paint and sand, to the ITF’s testing laboratory in London.) For the most prominent ITF-organized events — the Davis Cup and Fed Cup — federation employees must fly with their testing devices, or ship them to sites weeks in advance, to keep hosts from giving players too big a home-court advantage.Now, the ITF is trying to find an easier way to ensure courts are fair. On a recent Thursday at a London tennis court,1I’m not disclosing the tennis court’s location at the ITF’s request, to protect client confidentiality. Jamie Capel-Davies, manager of ITF’s science and technical department, was testing a new device that the federation has helped develop. It’s known as SPRite,2Said like the soft drink; the SPR is short for Surface Pace Rating. The official name for the device measures is court-pace rating, though, as Capel-Davies noted, “‘CPRite’ didn’t have the same ring to it.” and this test was of model number 007.The device doesn’t take a vodka martini. Instead, a ball cannon powered by a bicycle pump propels a ball off the court and through the testing chamber. Seconds later, a display shows the court-speed measurement. The measurement device and ball cannon each weigh about 14 pounds and together cost $12,000, compared to the 110-pound, $45,000 behemoth that sets the standard now. The new devices can be carried by hand, and their dimensions fall within most airlines’ carry-on baggage limits. The motivation for the test, Capel-Davies said, was “democratizing court-pace rating.”3In tennis, democracy is relative: At this price the average hacker won’t be carrying the SPRite and cannon to her local public court.The ITF knows it’s traded some precision for lightness and mobility. The question is, how much? Is SPRite accurate enough to replace its forebears? Capel-Davies and his colleagues were testing it alongside the Sestée, which is the current benchmark. Court-speed rating typically runs between 20 and 70 — and must run between 24 and 50 for Davis Cup matches (a higher number means a faster court).4The court-pace rating, or CPR, is calculated based on the coefficient of restitution (COR), which is the ratio of a ball’s vertical velocity after bounce to its pre-bounce vertical velocity; the coefficient of friction (COF), which is the ratio of horizontal velocity lost after the bounce to pre-bounce vertical velocity multiplied by the sum of 1 and COR; and a temperature-adjusted COR, which is the sum of the COR and 0.003 multiplied by 23 minus the mean ball temperature, in Celsius. The formula is: CPR = 100(1-COF)+150(0.81-adjusted COR). The ITF calls courts with CPR of 29 and under slow, courts with CPR between 35 and 39 medium and courts with CPR of 45 and up fast. The ITF wants SPRite to run within two points of Sestée for the same court.Court speed matters in tennis. During a typical match, the ball will bounce off the court hundreds of times. If the ball typically retains much of its speed, it will be harder to play. That encourages more aggressive play — players will charge the net more often to avoid skidding balls and tricky bounces. A slower court lets players camp out behind the baseline and chase down most shots.Court-pace rating takes into account more than speed, though. The ITF tested the court speed perceptions of U.K. players who were good enough to play for their counties5It’s also tried surveying pros, and gotten similar results, but the response rate was poor. and found that the height of ball bounce mattered, too. The lower the bounce, the faster the court seemed. That’s why high-bouncing clay courts like the French Open’s seem slower than hard courts with the same coefficient of restitution, or ratio of the ball’s speed after impact to its speed before the bounce.6One theory for clay’s higher bounce: The ball pushes granules ahead of it as it collides with the surface, creating an incline to bounce off, a “ramp effect” that leads to a higher bounce. And grass courts, with their lower bounce, seem faster to players than similar hard courts. The ITF formula attempts to account for all this.Once a match is underway, players can’t do anything about the court speed. They play the bounces they get. But players can tailor their training and schedules around which courts best suit their games. For instance, clay makes Rafael Nadal’s heavily topspun forehand shots bounce even higher than on other surfaces. He has taken advantage of this throughout his career by playing more clay tournaments than some of his rivals.For the ITF team competitions, court speed is a crucial part of home-court advantage: Host countries get to choose the surface, which is why Andy Murray had to play on his least favorite surface — clay — in Great Britain’s two away Davis Cup ties this year. (Murray and his teammates won in the U.S. but lost in Italy.)With the currently approved devices, the ITF can’t test the courts at every Davis Cup site, especially on busy weekends when dozens of ties are happening around the world. Instead it audits, choosing to test just a few courts. And at tournaments it doesn’t oversee, including the French Open, there’s simply no official court-pace measurement. (Officials at the U.S. Open and Wimbledon said they test their courts for speed, but the results are confidential.)That makes it tough to assess whether court speeds have changed — one of the goals of Capel-Davies’s department. Tennis players and writers often say — or lament — that pro tournaments are using a narrower range of court speeds than they used to, so there’s less variation among them. Indirect indicators, such as rates of aces or service breaks adjusted for tournament fields, don’t corroborate that impression. The ITF hasn’t tested long enough or often enough to settle the debate. “We don’t have that kind of data,” Capel-Davies said. “I don’t know if anyone does.” The International Tennis Federation uses a bulky steel crate, top left, to ship heavy measuring devices to tournament sites. The outsized Sestée, top right, is difficult to transport, so manufacturers often send samples of their courts, bottom right, to the ITF. The latest-generation device is the SPRite, operated here by Jamie Capel-Davies, manager of ITF’s science and technical department. Its accuracy is still being studied. Carl Bialik Watching Capel-Davies test SPRite in London, it was easy to see the advantages of the new device. He easily carried it onto and around the court, to different testing spots. He also let me try, and within a few minutes I got each test down to under a minute: Take a ball out of a coat that’s lying next to the unit, put the coat back in place, put the ball into the cannon, give the bicycle pump a few cranks, prime the measurement unit, put my foot7We’d taken off our shoes to avoid scuffing the court. on it for stability and press the button to fire.Yes, a coat. Needing something to stop the balls after they had fired from the cannon, bounced off the court and gone through the SPRite, Capel-Davies offered up his jacket to science, taking care to first remove his phone. After each test, the ball nestled in the coat. As we conducted our experiment, Capel-Davies’s colleagues were testing the Sestée on another part of the court. At one point, a Sestée-measured ball got loose and whistled past us.Each court test covered a few different spots, always including ones near the baseline, the service line and the net. The speed can vary from one part of the court to the next. It’s often highest near the baseline because players’ shoes wear down the surface and make it slicker. This court was relatively new, though, so we weren’t expecting as much variation.The measurement process has other quirks. Fail to press the button firmly, and the cannon might not fire fast enough for a reliable measurement. This happened a couple of times to us, so we omitted those readings. Capel-Davies decided when to do that, and it wasn’t a double-blind procedure. He checked with the other group and knew what readings they’d gotten, and was following along as our parallel tests produced results. Still, the quest for an accurate reading seemed genuine. The ITF already had achieved its initial goal of agreement within five points between the devices, which is what a typical player can detect. Then it set its sights on even better agreement, of within two points.Capel-Davies and his team have their own testing lab at ITF headquarters in the southwest London neighborhood of Roehampton, in a converted squash court with the original wood floor now scuffed by equipment. Tennis scientists test balls in a wind tunnel and rackets in a serving machine, nicknamed Goran after 2001 Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanišević, in homage to his rocket serves. The apparatus gripping the racket occasionally slips, and there are marks to prove it on the side of the machine. “We have had casualties” — of rackets, not people, Capel-Davies said.The ITF is surrounded by tennis courts. The Bank of England Sports Centre, which hosts next month’s Wimbledon qualifying tournament, is on one side. On the other is the National Tennis Centre. Many ITF employees play tennis during their lunch breaks. But they don’t have their own dedicated full-sized court for testing. So when they get a gig testing a court, like this one, they often take the opportunity to test SPRite.If SPRite passes the test, the ITF, as its seller, will benefit through increased sales, though that’s not the primary motivation, Capel-Davies said. “We’ve had interest, but everyone is waiting” to see what the results are “before putting their hands in their wallets,” he said.Mainly, the organization would like to enable more facilities, including tennis clubs, to test court speed. Having a device on site would allow clubs to measure the effect of temperature and also to track changes in the courts, to know when it’s time to resurface. A manufacturer’s rating, based on a test of a half-meter-long square patch, isn’t good enough because it doesn’t take into account what’s under the surface, how it was attached and how the court has weathered and worn.At tournaments, organizers could test how the speed of a court changes as players play on it — for instance, at grass-court tournaments, as players’ shoes and shots turn the turf near the baseline into dirt. And they could compare speed across different courts; players often say some courts at the same venue play faster than others, something that affects them if they play consecutive matches on different courts.These possibilities haven’t yet arrived. Our test found the SPRite and the Sestée agreed to within 2.7 points — good but not within the desired range of 2.0 points.8The ITF is aiming for agreement at 95 percent confidence of within 2.0 points. The average absolute value of the difference between readings by each device was 1 point for our test. One location, near the service line, was the source of the troubles: The two devices agreed to within 3.2 points, whereas everywhere else was within the limit.“It suggests something odd happened at that location,” Capel-Davies said. “Hopefully, additional testing will determine whether it was an anomaly.” He hopes that the SPRite model we tested, which was first produced last fall, will meet the target by the end of this year.Even if players at every level knew the speed of the courts they were playing on, they’d still have to deal with unpredictable bounces. Court speed can depend on how long the ball your opponent just served was sitting in his pocket: The warmer the ball, the slower the court appears to be. And standard measurements don’t apply when the ball collides with a hill or valley, common on clay courts.Still, broadening access to the court-speed numbers would help further the mission of Capel-Davies’s department, which is, as he articulated it, “to balance technology and tradition in tennis,” and to “make sure the player won because of ability” — and not faulty equipment or a finicky court.CORRECTION (June 2, 4:00 p.m.): An earlier version of this article said the average agreement of the SPRite and the Sestée in a recent test was 2.7 points in court-pace rating, or CPR, and that the two devices’ average agreement was 3.2 points in one location. Those figures were the agreement between the two devices at 95 percent confidence. The average of the absolute value of the differences between the two devices’ measurements was 1 point of CPR. read more

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Royal Bahamas Defence Force STRENGTH IS FOR SERVICE NOT STATUS

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, October 6, 2017 – Nassau – ‘Strength’ can be defined in many different ways, because it means so many different things to different people.  But at its most basic meaning, we are usually inclined to think about bodily power…muscles…and the state of being strong.   Well if this is the measurement of strength, then Chief Petty Officer James Darling is the walking definition of the word.Chief Petty Officer Darling joined the Royal Bahamas Defence Force as a member of Entry 24 on May 8, 1989 and has contributed much in his years of service.   He has served in various departments such as the Military Operations Platoon (MOP) for some 18 years, Harbour Patrol Unit, Port Security and the seagoing Squadron Department.He is currently attached to the Training Department which is home for Chief Darling as he has been a part of the fitness world for approximately 31 years now as a competitive bodybuilder.   In a brief interview, he recalled how it all began.“When I was 18 [years of age], I had my first show at a stadium on Bernard Road.   Then I made The Bahamas team and we went down to Curacao and that’s where I got my first medal, a bronze medal in the Juniors. That was all in my first year of competing.”Chief Darling admits that his initial motivation for competing was based on vanity, however, over time, it has developed into something totally different.“Starting out, the sport was simply just fun and the girls, they always like a good body.   But over the years, with every part of my body I worked, I tried to develop it and I became extremely curious about nutrition and what I needed to do to carve my body to look how I wanted it to.”With a straight face, he said the sacrifices don’t feel like sacrifices anymore and that he stays away from bad habits.“I eat as healthy as I can and don’t really crave anything anymore.   I’ve been doing this for so long now, it’s no problem to not eat things I know I shouldn’t eat, because I eat for purpose and nutritional value, not for how things taste.   I don’t drink and I don’t smoke. I don’t live a wild lifestyle, because I know how my body works and responds based on what I put in it.”He continued competing and managed to rack up 2 championship wins before deciding to use his strength in the service of his country on the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. However, this did not deter him from his bodybuilding pursuits.“After I joined the Force, I ended up in Military Operations Platoon [now referred to as Commando Squadron] and I hung it up for about 10 years until I went to Haiti for 6 months in 1996 for a United Nations Peacekeeping Mission.   When we returned, I had two months off and started working out again and found myself back onstage.”Some of his national titles include the Bahamas Middle Weight Champion which he won four consecutive years from 1997 – 2000, Mr. Northern Bahamas in 2007 [where he also won Best Poser & Most Muscular], and the Mr. Bahamas overall title which he won six times.However, his success was not limited to local competitions.   He has also seen success in international competitions.   In fact, adding to his already extensive career accomplishments, just this year, Chief Darling competed in 3 separate international bodybuilding shows including the 2017 Pittsburg Pro Masters event where he won 3rd Place.   Other events this year included the 2017 Toronto Pro Supershow and the 2017 Tampa Pro where he placed 3rd in the Masters.As he continued to discuss his career, a few names came up such as Sub Lieutenant Delroy Dennis, Chief Petty Officer Greg Fernander (Retired), Chief Petty Officer Patrick Adderley and Petty Officer Kevin Dames, all Defence Force members who also had some experience competing in bodybuilding.Currently, as the only professional bodybuilder in The Defence Force and in The Bahamas still competing, Darling says he’s grateful for the way the Force has accommodated his training schedule and gave an exhaustive list of names of people who helped him along.  There was no way I could list them all.“The Command has given me the time off which is what I need most to train, make competitions and represent the country and I really appreciate that.   There were also people who encouraged me on and off the force.  The current Commander Defence Force [Commodore Tellis Bethel], Former Commander Defence Force, Commodore Clifford Scavella (Retired), Commander Michael Sweeting, Lieutenant Commander Whitfield Neely, Force Chief Petty Officer Edgar Brown, Petty Officer Marvin Darville…[list goes on].”After recalling names of some of the people who positively influenced his life, he was asked about his most memorable job-related experience – the one experience he will never forget, never wants to relive, but will never regret while enlisted on the Defence Force.“It was all a journey, but if I had to narrow it down, it would definitely be when I was sent to Haiti with CARICOM 3 for the UN Peacekeeping Mission.   I was a Marine Seaman at the time doing patrols in enemy territory.   That whole experience will stay with me.”When asked about possibly leaving after 31 years in bodybuilding, he said it’s not something he’s given much thought.“I’m open to mentoring others, but I have to see that they want it as bad as I did or even more.   But that doesn’t mean I’ll stop competing.   As long as my body responds, I’ll be competing.   I’ll think about leaving the sport, maybe when I turn 70 [joke].”He then commented on the future of the sport in The Bahamas.“There’s plenty room for persons interested to get in. It’s easy to get into, but difficult to stay in, because it’s an expensive sport and calls for plenty discipline, having to eat a certain way and take certain supplements.”He also didn’t fail to mention that he has a son [Jaye Darling], who is also actively involved in the sport.“I didn’t have a chance to hand the baton down to him, he kinda’ took it from me.   I sometimes give him pointers and tips wherever I can, but he trains himself, just like I did when I first started out.   He’s currently ‘Mr. Bahamas Men’s Muscular Physique’ and just recently made The Bahamas’ 22-member bodybuilding team scheduled to compete at the upcoming 2017 Central American and Caribbean(CAC) Championships.”Today, Chief Darling says for him, at this stage of his career, it’s definitely all about his country and it’s this love of country that keeps him going.“I believe every Bahamian has something they can give back and contribute to our country to make it better.   So for me personally, this is what I can give.   This is my talent and I feel obligated, like it’s my patriotic duty to represent The Bahamas in the best way I can.   The medals are great to come back home with, but I’m not chasing personal status, I’m doing it in service to my country.”Feature Story: Chief Petty Officer James DarlingBy: Marine Seaman Michael E. 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Cardinals Wrap Up First Day of Lenny LylesClark Wood Invitational

first_imgMen’s 110m Hurdles (Prelims)2. Martice Moore – 14.20 (+1.3)13. Aaron Johnson – 15.12 (+2.6)18. D’Onte Blount – 15.43 (+2.6)  Print Friendly Version Photo Gallery Women’s Shot Put (Unseeded)5. Victoria Farley – 14.46m/47-05.2520. Holly Hankenson – 11.37m/37-03.75 Men’s 5,000m3. Chandler Austin – 14:50.097. Daniel Fleace – 15:01.7938. Matthew Harper – 16:17.63Men’s Long Jump (Unseeded)8. Aaron Johnson – 6.66m/21-10.25 (+2.4) Men’s Long Jump (Seeded)1. Anthony McRoberts – 7.28m/23-10.75 (+2.9)2. Chris Woody – 7.10m/23-03.50 (+2.6) LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The University of Louisville track and field team wrapped up the first day of the Lenny Lyles/Clark Wood Invitational with three wins while seven Cardinals advanced to Saturday’s finals. Anthony McRoberts started the day with a win in the men’s long jump with a leap of 7.28m/23-10.75. Carsen Cassell then won the women’s unseeded hammer throw with a throw of 57.39m/188-03.The Cardinal women had the top three finishers in the 5000m. Dorcas Wasike set a new meet record in the 5,000m, winning the event with a time of 16:13.59.  Ivine Chemutai finished second with a time of 16:42.74 while Bailey Beery finished third with a time of 17:13.29.   In today’s prelims, Holly Hankenson and Sydney Hill both advanced to the 100m hurdle finals.  Hill finished with a time of 13.69 while Hankenson ran a personal best time of 14.21.  Martice Moore advanced to the men’s 110m hurdle finals with a time of 14.20 in the prelims.   Angel Amadi and Sharnae Alston advanced to the finals of the women’s 100m.  Amadi finished with a personal best time of 11.64 (+2.2) while Alston finished with a time of 11.86 (+1.5).  Donald McClinton, Jr. and Noah McBride qualified for the men’s 100m finals on Saturday.  McClinton finished with a time of 10.56 (+4.0) while McBride clocked a 10.52 (+3.2).The open pole vault was postponed due to wind and will begin at 9:00 a.m. on Saturday.  The meet will begin at 9:00 a.m on Saturday with the javelin throw and the open pole vault.  Running events will begin at noon with the 3,000m steeplechase and will wrap up with the men’s 4x400m. Louisville will honor the 2019 seniors with a ceremony at 11:50 a.m. Lenny Lyles/Clark Wood InvitationalCardinal Park | Louisville, Ky. April 26, 2019 Women’s Hammer Throw (Unseeded)1. Carsen Cassell – 57.39m/188-033. Halee Hudson – 54.60m/179-02 Women’s Hammer Throw (Seeded)4. Makenli Forrest – 61.35m/201-03 Women’s 5,000m 1. Dorcas Wasike – 16:13.592. Ivine Chemutai – 16:42.743. Bailey Beery – 17:13.295. Bailey Davis – 17:29.7410. Caroline Gosser – 17:53.45center_img Women’s 100m (Prelims)2. Angel Amadi – 11.64 (+2.2)8. Sharnae Alston – 11.86 (+1.5) Women’s 100m Hurdles (Prelims)3. Sydney Hill – 13.69 (+0.6)7. Holly Hankenson – 14.21 (+1.6)11. Kelsey Heyward – 14.55 (+1.1)14. Kayla Alexander – 14.71 (-1.1) Men’s 100m (Prelims)3. Donald McClinton – 10.56 (+4.0)7. Noah McBride – 10.52 (+3.2)29. Clay Moss – 11.51 (+4.0) Men’s Hammer Throw (Seeded)4. Mitchell Kessler -58.23m/191-00 Day 1 Results Women’s Long Jump (Seeded)3. Alexis Gibbons – 6.12m/20-01 (-2.7)5. Gabriela Leon – 6.02m/19-09 (-2.5)7. Renate van Tonder – 5.78m/18-11.75 (-2.7) Women’s Long Jump (Unseeded)2. Kayla Alexander – 6.01m/19-08.7511. Maranda Mills – 5.50m/18-00.50 Story Linkslast_img read more

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