Dwarf Mine by Yggdrasil

first_img Topics: Casino & games Slots Casino & games Deep underground, hidden treasure glistens in the light of torches. Forget the pick-axe, the dwarven digger goes deeper, hungry for valuable discoveries. 25th February 2019 | By Aaron Noy You can find out more about the slot here! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Companies: Yggdrasil Deep underground, hidden treasure glistens in the light of torches. Forget the pick-axe, the dwarven digger goes deeper, hungry for valuable discoveries.The digging machine is boosted by special crystals and can be expanded at any time using Bonus Drills. Three Bonus Drills push the machine into Free Spins Mode, while a collection of crystals brings Collection Free Spins with Super High Paying Symbols. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Dwarf Mine by Yggdrasil Email Addresslast_img read more

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Standard Chartered Bank Limited (SCBK.ke) 2020 Abridged Report

first_imgStandard Chartered Bank Limited (SCBK.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2020 abridged results.For more information about Standard Chartered Bank Limited reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations visit the Standard Chartered Bank Limited company page on AfricanFinancials.Indicative Share Trading Liquidity The total indicative share trading liquidity for Standard Chartered Bank Limited (SCBK.ke) in the past 12 months, as of 4th June 2021, is US$10.6M (KES1.15B). An average of US$883.12K (KES95.88M) per month.Standard Chartered Bank Limited Abridged Results DocumentCompany ProfileStandard Chartered Bank Limited is a financial services institution in Kenya offering banking products and services to the personal, commercial and corporate sectors. The financial institution is a subsidiary of Standard Chartered Bank Limited and has a presence in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. The company offers a full-service offering ranging from transactional banking to loans, mortgages, insurance and investments, asset management and treasury services. Formerly known as The Chartered Bank, the company changed its name to Standard Chartered Bank in 1969. The former company was founded in 1853 and is headquartered in London, United Kingdom. Standard Chartered Bank Limited’s head office is in Nairobi, Kenya. Standard Chartered Bank Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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Lloyds share price: Is the worst over for the FTSE 100 share? Here’s what I think

first_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares See all posts by Manika Premsingh The FTSE 100 index is getting weaker, but there’s a silver lining. And that comes quite unexpectedly, from the banks. According to news reports, banks could start paying dividends soon. Some investors may recall that banks were asked by the Bank of England (BoE) to suspend dividends after the stock market crash and the UK went into lockdown. This of course, included Lloyds Bank (LSE: LLOY). The Lloyds share price crashed on this development, indicating that the bank’s high dividend yield was the main attraction for many investors. Lloyds share price dragged down for many reasonsThings have only gotten worse since. The UK economy went into a recession, the pandemic still hasn’t been controlled, the bank has been accused of mis-selling, there’s likelihood that account holders with LLOY won’t be able to access them in the EU after Brexit, and there’s also speculation that the BoE will set negative interest rates, which can have huge implications for banks. As a result, in September, the Lloyds share price fell to the lowest levels this year. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…The BoE will decide whether or not it’s advisable for commercial banks to start paying out dividends again in the next three months. Going by its optimism, it could just do that. The bank’s Chief Economist, Andy Haldane, has long been optimistic about the UK economy’s prospects and expects a V-shaped recovery. In line with that, the BoE expects 20% growth for the July–September quarter. This would pretty much bring the economy back to its pre-lockdown levels. In other words, a V-shaped recovery is indeed here.Is this a good time to buy? So, would I buy the Lloyds Bank stock now? Not now, would be my answer. We can expect the BoE to make a verdict on banks’ dividends latest by the end of this year. Assuming that it does give a green light, the next question is whether Lloyds will necessarily start paying dividends then. Many FTSE 100 companies have paused dividend payouts because of the unclear economic outlook. And that goes for LLOY as well. In fact, it is especially true for banks, which are particularly impacted by weakness in the economy. Even if Lloyds does start paying dividends, will the share price rise? In the short term it could bounce back, and it probably will. But here at The Motley Fool, we are all about long-term investing. If an indicator of the future is the past, I’m not hopeful. This FTSE 100 share’s price hasn’t gone anywhere in years. Even if it pays dividends, but erodes capital, is it worth it?The take awayI’d put the Lloyds Bank share on my watchlist for now. If BoE gives banks a go ahead to pay dividends, I’d like to know when LLOY would actually stary paying them and the amount. Further, its reaction to the other issues mentioned above (and hopefully a resolution) would add to the stock’s merits. For now, I’m focusing on FTSE 100 stocks that offer both dividends and growth. Enter Your Email Address I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.center_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Lloyds share price: Is the worst over for the FTSE 100 share? Here’s what I think Manika Premsingh | Saturday, 3rd October, 2020 | More on: LLOY Image source: Getty Images. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.last_img read more

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Special report: Too Much, Too Soon In Rugby

first_imgLife comes at you fast. For a few unlucky young rugby pros, it can be too fast. In this special report, we look at why the physical and mental demands of the game can overwhelm, and celebrate those who ensure the kids are alright. This feature first appeared in Rugby World magazine in March. “I wasn’t your average kid leaving school,” says Wilson, who did labouring upon retiring. “I was slightly bigger and able to handle myself. Looking back, whether that benefited me or maybe the brakes should have been put on so I wasn’t exposed to so much at a young age, I am not 100% sure about it.“Because I would never say that I was pushed to play, but in my own head I probably pushed myself through injuries when I should have maybe taken a backwards step, with being so young.“I’ve never spoken to anyone about it, but when I started at the Falcons at 18 I felt like I was bottom of the chain, I had no right to moan or complain or have my opinions. My mindset was just to get my head down and graft and hopefully gain respect through that.End of the road: Wilson’s neck injury (Getty Images)“That sort of mentality maybe meant that in some training sessions, maybe games, I was playing through injuries – be it my lower back, which I had problems with for a number of years. I probably could have done with a bit more education on how to handle yourself with some injuries. Not just trying to be a hero or grit my teeth.”Yet how can you know you need something like that? Coaches can’t read minds when youngsters bottle things up.Wilson thought the Falcons academy was brilliant – a point we hear several times. He has no regrets and despite his career length, says: “I loved it.” Yet when talking about physical demands, he makes an interesting point.“I wouldn’t say it’s about all the rugby but the amount of training as well. Realistically, you’re hitting a lot more scrums in training in the week than you do in the game. You probably make more tackles in the week as well.”This is where we introduce Lesley McBride, a former physio for England U20 and a physiotherapy lecturer doing a PhD on neck strength in rugby players. The RFU, FA and Formula One figures are interested in her findings. And when Wilson wanted to talk about his final injury, guess who he called…“What I know is all about adolescence and how that is a period of vulnerability,” McBride says. “They are more susceptible to injury when they reach peak height velocity and peak weight velocity due to the combination of new bone formation and increased load.“The question is if coaches at all levels understand the different requirements of adolescents, and if so, can they modify training to account for these variables? Adolescence is generally categorised into early (ten-13), middle (14-16) and late (16-20). However, chronological age and skeletal/somatic growth often follow a less predictable and fixed sequence.“The clavicle (collarbone) is the final bone in the body to fuse, at around the age of 21, so it’s not really a surprise that the second-highest incidence of injury in the Junior World Championship (after concussion) is the AC joint at the shoulder.“Then consider scientific understanding around sleep. When the adolescent is asked to do gym training at 7am, in terms of their circadian rhythm it’s similar to asking an adult to do it at 3 or 4am. This is a recipe for disaster in terms of sleep deprivation and its impact on injury rate. Adult coaching principles cannot be applied to adolescents and yet I know that in many cases younger players’ sessions are not planned around the large body of evidence that surrounds their physical development.”McBride likens physiotherapy to avoiding a cliff edge. You cannot wait for them to be broken at the bottom to help.Related: The French gateway for South African rugby talentThe answer, she believes, is coaches listening to and learning from the academics and the science available. Wellness testing, on the whole, is done well she adds, but you must be aware of the signs that you are overloading or, just as important, underloading players.For example, if some are at a Premiership club and don’t play at a high standard regularly enough or train at a certain intensity often enough, they can ‘spike’ their load when it’s time to play U20 games; they’d suddenly have much more high-level training and competition than they’re used to, increasing risk.McBride sees poor tackling as a red flag for potential neck injury, albeit a harder one to spot in open play. If a youngster isn’t up to elite standard in the scrum it can be obvious from the get-go and you can take them out and work on it. But like Wilson, there’s another aspect of the scrum she wants us to monitor.“How many scrums are in a match?” she asks rhetorically. “An average of 13. Now how many scrums do they do in a training session in a row? Over and over again. And do people prepare for that aspect in the gym, then? No, they don’t.Exciting talent: Ioan Lloyd of Bristol is being well-managed (Getty Images)“So I’ve stripped it right back to saying that for a game of rugby, which is live and intense and difficult, that you train for that sensibly. That’s doing a few scrums in each rugby session in the week – not one big scrum session, otherwise you are really stressing that neck. What we know is that as soon as the neck muscles get fatigued, your balance goes so you’re more prone to other injuries and you can’t do everything you need in a game as well. So if we looked after them from an earlier age and we planned sessions more to mimic what a game looked like, you would be protecting them.”At the highest levels, McBride believes this happens because coaches are well educated. And with her research, which hopes to produce a standardised measurement of neck strength, she reckons teams all over the world can better determine a young player’s readiness to play on the biggest stages.For the moment at least, you cannot tally it all. So it is about entrusting a system to do the right thing. In Bristol there is another set-up earning praise.According to senior academy manager Gethin Watts, careful consideration goes into planning for the long-term needs of each player. Look at their breakout star, 18-year-old playmaker Ioan Lloyd.“If you look at the amount of minutes Ioan has played, the exposure he has had has outshone the actual number of minutes he’s had. That’s actually down to design. It’s not by accident. He’s had small introductions to prepare himself for lots of minutes later down the line.”INTERNATIONAL ACTSIf we want to talk about the greatest stage, we must talk Tests and the desire to one day get there. For some of those who make the climb early, though, there can be perils aplenty along the way.We all know the story of Mat Tait in 2005, making his England debut at 18, being manhandled by Gavin Henson against Wales, dropped the next week. And on that Tait tells Rugby World, when asked if he was handled well by his national side afterwards: “Probably not!”He believes that from a rugby perspective, dropping him was the right call but he adds: “We went back into camp on a Monday or Tuesday and I dropped out of the 23. And then I think I had to go down and watch the France game (in round two) which was torture.”Upended: Mat Tait (Getty Images)It became a national discussion. Tait wouldn’t make that side again until June 2006. He is certain that the coach at the time, Andy Robinson, and his staff will have learnt from how they used him.Later echoing the sentiment, Tait adds: “Sport is all about failure but also after you make mistakes on and off the pitch – players, coaches, management. The important thing is taking the learnings from that to move both individual and team performance forward as the game evolves.”In the years since, Tait has noticed an increase in public dialogues about being in a healthy place, mentally, saying: “Ultimately, if someone is in a good mental space, you will get the best version of them, whether that be in an office or on a field in front of 80,000.”He feels Falcons’ choice to let him play sevens was great man management and helped him to evade the spotlight. But he’s wary of social media traps for kids. It is an area of intense discussion today.Tait tells us: “When people texted me after the Wales game – friends meaning well, saying ‘Don’t read anything, you did really well’ – I thought f*** off, stop texting me! I don’t want to know, even if it’s not specifics, I know I’m dealing with this anyway. So imagine what players like Quade Cooper, Danny Cipriani – players who are potentially polarising – have to deal with, being on a platform that allows keyboard warriors to abuse them.”Before social media really forced its way into our lives, though, there was a band of young players introduced to the very top level early, who know all about the glare. Players like Tait and Cooper, but also Mathieu Bastareaud.“In France it was a big, big, big, big story,” Bastareaud says of the 2009 controversy when he was sent home from a tour in New Zealand for lying about falling over and injuring his face after a drunken night, claiming at first he was assaulted by five Kiwi locals.“The prime minister talked about it in the newspapers. A lot of people talked badly about me. That was very hard for me but more for my family.“They knew I made a mistake but all those bad comments, for me it was too much for my mistake. I killed nobody but some journalists tried to go to my mother’s house, call my father with withheld numbers. It was very hard for my family and friends.Under scrutiny: Mathieu Bastareaud in 2009 (Getty Images)“But at the end of this story I think it made me stronger. After that I see the real face of professional world rugby. After my international debut I was successful, I was on the top. But in two months people talked of me like I was garbage and I was finished with rugby.”In his autobiography, Bastareaud later revealed the horror and dysfunction back home in France, of drinking and a suicide attempt. He was just 21.Aftercare. If we learn anything from these two stories from the spotlight we can deduce that talking to youngsters at the top end, where it’s toughest, is vital. Both feel they learnt from the time, but would you want others to go through it?There is no manual for all this. Though there are some things you can learn along the way. Eventually, somehow.Related: Harry Robinson on preparing for the futureEver since his Super Rugby debut at 18 for the Reds, Quade Cooper has caused chatter in Australia. He was a Wallaby by 20. He tells us: “It’s not like when you’re well-known at school but you’re still just kids. I don’t want to use the word ‘famous’ but as a public figure, like it or not, what you do has an impact. After my first season I didn’t understand that. I just wanted to be an 18-year-old kid.”Catching the eye: Quade Cooper in 2009 (Getty Images)There was something else too. “I didn’t understand much about money. I’d never had it, my family never had it. So I’d never had advice. Who could you go to?“I learnt the hard way. I’d spend all my money, pay cheque to pay cheque, every cent, because I knew it would fill back up. There was a lightbulb moment in the Australia U20 camp. A team-mate had just put a deposit down on a house. He was telling me about it and I thought, ‘I’ve not even bought a house.’ He saved for two years, while I was getting paid way more a week.”He acknowledges the infantilising nature of rugby – performance is often the focus. So he found help via his agent. Sounds simple, but he still sees young players baffled by money.Yet Cooper also sees a lot more teams getting it right, offering help and giving good advice. And he finishes with a point that sums up so much: the ideal, he says, is to have support networks in place so you can err and learn – without leaving a legacy of damage.This feature first appeared in Rugby World magazine in March. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Illustration by Charlotte Chesher Special report: Too Much, Too Soon In RugbyHE WAS earmarked as special, early. As one respected youth mentor tells us, “He was described by top coaches as the next England tighthead.” But things didn’t quite pan out like that for Jack Stanley.Brought into Exeter for his second of two years with Truro College, he played A league and LV= Cup in 2015 and trained with the first team. But soonhe decided he did not want that life.As the Cornish native tells Rugby World: “There was a small element of being exposed to it all too soon. I must have been 18 when I had this feeling come down that I didn’t want to be at Chiefs.”Young Chief: Stanley (Getty)The prop was not coerced to sign up and is full of praise for the academy and coaches in Exeter. But after struggling with a broken wrist, enjoyment sapping away in the rehab room as frustrations he could not verbalise grew, there were months of “feeling s**t; I felt pretty depressed”. He abruptly walked away from the club, not even consulting his parents before making the decision.In two years out, he moved on to “12-hour days stacking shelves in a supermarket” and his weight climbed to 155kg before he realised what rugby could be for him if he started over.Now 23, Stanley grabbed a prospect opened up by friends and is on a dual contract with Edinburgh and Super6 side Watsonians. He loved his second year in the Scottish capital, grinding within Richard Cockerill’s structure there, happily working back from a time when he felt he had to run away from the sport (Ed: Stanley has since moved to Gloucester).He also harbours no ill feelings and adds of his departure: “To be fair, Rob Baxter (Chiefs boss) was great about it all. He was always very understanding and apologetic – he said pretty much that they probably put too much on me as a youngster.”On current practice, Chiefs academy head Rob Gibson tells us: “We have to make sure players are emotionally ready, they are physically ready. We are looking to put players in the Premiership at the right time, sometimes 21, 22, but it changes. It’s getting tougher due to the strength of our squad.“Education is paramount – that’s the (focus) we push. But not every player wants to go that way, so we’ve got to try to find what’s best. You don’t always get it right, the individual doesn’t always get it right. You have to adapt to support (players).”For those who pride themselves on developing talent, lessons along the way must be vitally important, for all parties. Of course by nature the sport is confrontational. It is not for everyone.Success story: George Ford for Leicester at just 16. (Getty Images)In a recent column for The Irish Times about entitled young athletes, former Leinster and Scotland coach Matt Williams wrote: “The privileged life of professional sport is not offered to many people and there are many doors that can quickly take you out of it.” He praised the virtues of being selfless, hard-working and willing to sacrifice.By his own admission, Stanley says bad habits crept into his game when he thought he’d made it. But he’s glad to have seen the real world out there and is knuckling down now.Yet, as you will read, there is much to be aware of when dealing with kids. We want them to love it.This report looks not to point fingers or pretend there is widespread crisis. It is to show what young, ambitious players can face; the mental load, hits, added pressures. We heard stories of great work, worthy of praise. Many reflect on experiences – good and bad – constructively.There may not be many getting it wrong but we must still safeguard against too much, too soon for future stars…MENTAL LOADStanley says that what was missing for him was the ear of someone who knew what he was going through. As he says: “I just feel like I should have had a bit of guidance. There wasn’t really anybody else in that situation from my college that I could relate to. I didn’t really have anyone I could share the experience with or know how to get it right, so that I didn’t end up falling out of love with it.”He also holds his hands up and says he could have been proactive and sought others to talk to – everything was new, but “acting tough was a big part of it, because that’s probably the most important characteristic that you need to have just to play the game”.Creating a better pathway for younger players to discuss issues is something more people in the game are working towards. But as Jack’s tale makes clear, watching how players ‘transition’ is key.Related: The strain on young refereesThe Rugby Players’ Association (RPA) tells us: “Our welfare programmes, such as ‘Gain Line’, have focused on academy players for many years, as we’re acutely aware of the transition pressures involved in players coming from a school environment into a senior professional rugby environment and then, a year or years later, making the transition into a senior squad, a different level of rugby or out of the professional game completely.”A Premiership-wide study is underway to look at what young players deal with, as new experiences and pressures mount. The RPA adds: “We are aware of the psychological load faced by academy players and, together with the RFU, Premiership Rugby and Cardiff Met University, are undertaking (soon to be completed) research in this area.”The RPA cannot be the only people considering mental load management. However, related studies are too few.Bright future: England U20s this season (Getty Images)In the 2020 paper Applied Sport Science for Male Age-Grade Rugby Union in England, Professor Stephen Mellalieu of Cardiff Met wrote part of it on ‘psychological challenges and development’. It went: “Psychology is acknowledged as a key determinant in the realisation of potential and long-term success in sport, especially rugby union. However, despite this importance, the prevalence of systematic psychological inquiry into both senior and youth populations worldwide in the sport is scarce. To date, five studies have investigated the psychological challenges and developmental demands faced by age-grade English RU players. These studies have focused upon the stress and coping experiences of players and the psychological factors contributing to successful talent development.”Later in the paper, it summarises: “RU players face a range of psychological demands and adopt numerous strategies to cope with these challenges… Understanding the psychological characteristics that facilitate and derail progression can enhance coaches’ player assessment when identifying and supporting youth rugby union players.Related: Vulnerability and the risk of schoolboy doping“Given the limited literature to date, future research should seek to examine in greater depth the psychological demands age-grade RU players from England face, the skills/strategies deployed to successfully transition to the elite professional level and the factors (eg, personal, situational, organisational and cultural) that mediate this progression.”It would be naive to assume as we talk about load and transition that we are suggesting mollycoddling kids is the way ahead. According to ex-England U18 coach Russell Earnshaw, they’d prefer to play fixtures away from home, often with younger sides than their opponents, with players exploring new positions. Small bumps in the road were desirable.Someone who has looked at the youth game through an academic prism is Jamie Taylor, who was an academy head coach at Leicester Tigers and now works as a senior performance pathway scientist for the English Institute of Sport, out of Loughborough University.Winning feeling: Leicester’s youngsters (Getty Images)“What is widespread is those who have it too easy falling away,” Taylor tells us. For him, it’s a disaster if any kids cruise through school racking up wins, reach rep rugby and it happens again but then at the first knock – a sharp rise in training standards with the pros, playing badly or picking up an injury – they aren’t equipped to handle it.“Someone who has an earlier birthday in an age group has a two-to-three times greater chance of being selected for a talent platform. That’s called the ‘relative age effect’. However, the data at senior level shows those numbers flattening out.“So you might be twice as likely to be selected for a talent pathway, but you are far less likely to make it at top level.”For Taylor, asking about ‘too much, too soon’ is the wrong question – it’s more about ‘how hard is it and for how long?’ Progression is better than sharp inclines.He’d also like to see more education to help academies manage challenge levels appropriately and for standards of schools rugby to be raised to support long-term player development.Taylor wants tailored plans for existing talent. A watered-down version of first-team training won’t cut it. But any plan must consider the physical side too.PHYSICAL TOLL“Rugby is a unique sport and I don’t think there’s another sport in the world like it,” says Peter Walton, the popular coach who led the England U18 programme for years alongside John Fletcher. Yet when asked if he thinks we often assume that academy prospects come out the sausage machine ready for the senior pro game, he answers in the affirmative. And for him we need to consider the physical maturity of kids.“We think, ‘Yeah, he can bench-press 180kg – he’s strong’. But that doesn’t mean he’s strong enough to scrummage.“That worries me. That people think anybody is coming out and it’s ‘Right, you’re a big-framed lad, we’ll get you in the front row.’ It doesn’t mean his whole body is ready for it. My motto is there’s no rush. I feel we rush people.”It is worth pointing out that Walton played in Newcastle with Jonny Wilkinson – “one of the first ones who really got the chance at a young age to play the game as it got professional” – and he is now managing the youth in Gloucester, where teenage sensation Louis Rees-Zammit is tearing up trees against Premiership foes. Walton has seen a few different approaches.He is also realistic enough to realise clubs have necessities. There is only so much money you can throw at a squad and there are fixtures to fulfil. For each fixture you need two full front rows. For him, you should have at least ten props in your squad and with some youngsters. Injuries mean that some, not ready for full games yet, may go in. He gets that. What irks him is something else.Working the neck: Young players with Lyon (Getty Images)“There have been other times, I know, where people put players in because they think they’re good enough,” Walton says. “It’s ‘He’s played age-group rugby’ or ‘He was an U18 prop’. And they are good enough (at rugby) but strength-wise, under their skeleton, under their skin, are they really good enough yet?“That’s what worries me – that we don’t know what’s under them. We don’t know how developed neck muscles are and sure they can go on machines and push things, but are they really ready? I’m not so sure they are. I’ve spoken to guys who should be further on in their careers and aren’t. I’m convinced they were pushed into that environment a bit early.”Walton’s next point is important: he is adamant no one does that on purpose. He also believes that every player, every scenario and every club is different. Everyone wishes they knew the exact right time to throw someone into action.But before we jump to the medical view, it is worth getting a player’s perspective on the physical side.Related: Chris Boyd on using young stars at the right timeWalton, and many others, believe that were it not for a career-ending neck injury, Falcons prop Scott Wilson would have had a special career for England. So when Walton says that if he could have one wish, he would want all young players to suddenly “think long-term” it chimes with Wilson’s view on his time. TAGS: Investigation Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Downtown Studio / Luís Peixoto

first_img Year:  Manufacturers: Investwood, Flaminia, Margres, Primus Vitória, SanindusaEngineer:Eng Serra Moura, Eng. Rui MarranaBuilder:Grupo M CaetanoClients:Gonçalo PaciênciaTeam:Rodrigo Gorjão Henriques, Luciana RochaCity:PortoCountry:PortugalMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Arménio TeixeiraRecommended ProductsWoodBruagBalcony BalustradesDoorsLibartVertical Retracting Doors – Panora ViewDoorsStudcoAccess Panels – AccessDorFiber Cements / CementsApavisaTiles – Nanofusion 7.0Text description provided by the architects. This project consists in the transformation of a small apartment inserted in a building of the XIX century located in the historical center of Porto. Given the small dimension of the space and the customer’s specifications to increase the useful area, the proposal is based on the design of a mezzanine over the central space, taking advantage of the high ceilings characteristic of the constructions of this period. This intermediate floor thus integrates a bedroom, an additional and open space over the living room, and above all private and separate. The lower floor develops into the living and dining room, which also includes the kitchen. The remaining service spaces like the bathroom and storage are concentrated in the surplus area, interior and under the bedroom.Save this picture!© Arménio TeixeiraSave this picture!Plan 00Save this picture!© Arménio TeixeiraSave this picture!Plan 01In terms of language, the project seeks to respect the history of the building, both by the predominance of wood and by the reinterpretation of some specific elements of the architecture of this time, namely the window shutters and the high skirtings. In addition, the design of the ceiling stands out on the mezzanine because goes back to the image of the Portuguese vernacular house. The “house within the house” is the concept of this project and the desire to enhance the space of this apartment with the domestic comfort characteristic of a detached house.Save this picture!© Arménio TeixeiraProject gallerySee allShow lessNivezé House / Michel Prégardien ArchitectureSelected ProjectsSukhumvit 91 House / Archimontage Design Fields SophisticatedSelected ProjectsProject locationAddress:Rua Sá da Bandeira, Porto, PortugalLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Apartments Downtown Studio / Luís Peixoto Area:  807 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Portugal Architects: Luís Peixoto Area Area of this architecture project Projects 2018 “COPY” CopyApartments, Renovation•Porto, Portugalcenter_img ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/906363/downtown-studio-luis-peixoto Clipboard “COPY” Downtown Studio / Luís PeixotoSave this projectSaveDowntown Studio / Luís Peixoto Photographs Photographs:  Arménio Teixeira Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/906363/downtown-studio-luis-peixoto Clipboard Save this picture!© Arménio Teixeira+ 16Curated by Pedro Vada Share CopyAbout this officeLuís PeixotoOfficeFollowProductsWoodStone#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsRefurbishmentRenovationOportoPortugalPublished on December 11, 2018Cite: “Downtown Studio / Luís Peixoto” [Downtown studio / Luís Peixoto] 11 Dec 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogShowerhansgroheShowers – RainfinityGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GeometricPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® Premium SeriesMetal PanelsTECU®Copper Surface – Patina_VariationsBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersMembranesEffisusFaçade Fire Weatherproofing Solutions in Design District Project LondonSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylight Ridgelight in Office BuildingSwitchesJUNGLight Switch – LS PlusCurtain WallsRabel Aluminium SystemsSpider System – Rabel 15000 Super ThermalWindowspanoramah!®ah! Soft CloseWoodAustralian Sustainable Hardwoods (ASH)American Oak by ASHChairs / StoolsOKHADining Chair – BarnettMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Two Inner Mongolian websites closed because of “separatist” content

first_img ChinaAsia – Pacific ChinaAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information Organisation October 3, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two Inner Mongolian websites closed because of “separatist” content China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison June 2, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Follow the news on China Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes Receive email alerts to go further News News The closure on 26 September of Ehoron.com and Monhgal.com, two websites based in the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region, for allegedly hosting “separatist” content is the result of the Chinese government’s determination to gag cultural minorities, Reporters Without Borders said today. The closure on 26 September of www.ehoron.com and www.monhgal.com, two websites based in the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region, for allegedly hosting “separatist” content is the result of the Chinese government’s determination to gag cultural minorities, Reporters Without Borders said today.“Freedom of expression is still more restricted for the Mongols, Tibetans and Uighurs than for the rest of the Chinese population,” the press freedom organisation said. “These minorities are censored as soon as they express themselves on issues even remotely linked to politics. As everywhere in China, websites and local forums are carefully monitored and banned as soon as they show signs of dissent.”Created in September 2004 by Mongolian students, the www.ehoron.com website was a platform of expression for about 1,300 Mongolian students who were “Internet refugees” from www.nutuge.com, a site that was closed in March 2004. Ehoron.com, which included a discussion forum, covered a range of subjects affecting Inner Mongolia without touching on human rights, politics or religion.The Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Centre (whose site cannot be accessed from within China) quoted the forum’s administrations as saying the reason given by the local authorities for closing their site was the “separatist” content that was being posted, apparently a reference to messages that had appeared in the forum criticising a Chinese TV cartoon that showed Genghis Khan as a mouse with a pig’s snout.The other site, www.monhgal.com, is the website of the law firm Monhgal. It was closed for encouraging Internet users to write to the Chinese authorities to protest against the same cartoon and for asking them to collect evidence for a lawsuit against its producer and distributor. The site, which offers legal assistance to Inner Mongolian residents who have any kind of legal conflict with the state, ceased to be accessible on 26 September. An Internet user trying to access the site was redirected to the Chinese information ministry’s site. The Monghal site was available again yesterday but those in charge have had to undertake “not to post any more separatist-type information.”The Mongols are not the only minority subject to censorship by Beijing. The government also blocks access to many sites operated by members of Xinjiang province’s Uighur minority such as www.uhrp.org and www.uyghuramerican.org. News April 27, 2021 Find out more News China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures March 12, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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252 people categorised as homeless in Limerick

first_imgFacebook WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSAlan Jacqueshomelesshomelessnesshousing crisislimerickSarah Jane HennellySocial Democrats Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live NewsLocal News252 people categorised as homeless in LimerickBy Alan Jacques – March 4, 2017 930 WhatsApp Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” center_img Previous articleIn Pics – Limerick Literary Festival officialy opened by Olivia O LearyNext articleMan’s body found at Limerick city restaurant Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie LOCAL Social Democrats representative Sarah Jane Hennelly has condemned the Government following publication of new homeless figures confirming that 252 people are now homeless in Limerick.In the Mid-West region, there are 52 children living in emergency accommodation while the nationwide figures show 7,000 people in emergency accommodation, including 2,400 children.“This is totally unacceptable. It is deplorable that any children, let alone 52, are living in emergency accommodation in our area. It is storing up huge problems for the future for those individual families and for our society,” Ms Hennelly told the Limerick Post.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up She also believes the Government is not treating the housing crisis like the emergency that it is.“Unaffordable rents are driving homelessness at the moment. Yet the Government’s rent control measures do not apply to any part of Limerick and in any case don’t go far enough. Landlords should only be allowed raise rents by the general level of inflation and this should be applied to the whole country.“Why is the Minister for Housing protecting landlord profits in the middle of a housing emergency?” she asked.There are 200,000 vacant properties across the State. Surely there are ways to free these up for long-term accommodation. It beggars belief that the Government haven’t been able to figure this out. The Government promised last year that they would reduce the number of children living in emergency accommodation by a thousand by July this year. This simply won’t happen.”by Alan [email protected] Linkedin Print Email Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Twitter Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clashlast_img read more

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Tracking Legislative Processes in Financial Services

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Tracking Legislative Processes in Financial Services Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: BCFP Bills Compliance Financial services Homeowners Legal League 100 Regulations Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: CoreLogic Integrates Geospatial and Appraisal Data Features Next: The Week Ahead: Spotlight on Economic Trends Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago BCFP Bills Compliance Financial services Homeowners Legal League 100 Regulations 2018-09-09 David Wharton About Author: David Wharton in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Print Features The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Related Articlescenter_img Subscribe Sign up for DS News Daily  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago September 9, 2018 1,744 Views Share Save Editor’s Note: This feature originally appeared in the September issue of DS News, out now.After graduating from the University of San Diego, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and Spanish, Andrew Boylan received his Juris Doctorate degree from the University of San Diego School of Law and his MBA from the University of San Diego Graduate School of Business Administration. Boylan has spoken on regulatory and legal compliance issues at numerous mortgage industry events. Boylan has also received the highest possible AV Preeminent Rating from Martindale-Hubbell by members of the Bar and Judiciary in both legal ability and ethical standards. He is licensed to practice law in the States of California and Washington. Boylan spoke to DS News during the Legal League 100 Servicer Summit in Dallas, Texas.What would you say is the most critical aspect of the Legal League Summits?With the wide array of panels available, you can get out of it what you want. It’s good to hear about evolving trends regarding the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) and make sure we stay ahead of any potential other issues. Even if something is only affecting one part of the country at the moment, it’s often inevitable that you will eventually see it in your jurisdiction as well.Legal League events are an excellent way for firms, servicers, banks, GSEs, and everyone to come together as an industry and talk about issues, talk about trends, get ahead of things, and ensure we are keeping the lines of communication open. We can learn a lot from each other, and it’s definitely worth the time and travel.What are some of the trends that are affecting the way you do business this year?Our firm operates in nine states. That makes for nine different sets of laws with which we have to ensure compliance, as well as regulations from the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection and other government agencies. There’s great value in tracking that and knowing your states’ legislative processes, knowing what bills are out there, and knowing how they will affect your operations. Our firm is part of many different groups where we attend advocacy days, work with lobbyists, and even meet face-to-face with legislators to discuss the industry. It’s a chance to educate them on what we do, what issues we see, and to help prevent legislation from passing that could have an adverse impact on our firm, our clients, or our industry.Could you tell us about some of the legislation you’ve been tracking in recent months?In California, there’s a pending law that’s looking to bring back the Homeowner Bill of Rights. It sunset at the end of 2017, but now there’s a law that’s looking to bring it back. It’s important to stay involved and see what version of it is being put forward and where it might be highly litigated or unclear. If there is an area that’s unclear, it’s advantageous for all players—whether it’s within our industry or even on the borrower side—to know what the law is and that there aren’t any areas of ambiguity that could lead to additional litigation.What are some issues the industry is dealing with right now that you foresee continuing to be a challenge into 2019?Depending upon what governing body you’re dealing with, it’s about having as much input and as loud a voice as possible to create a structure that’s fair and reasonable. There are concessions, and there are many protections that are in place for good reason. But it’s also about making sure that we’re educating the lawmakers and regulatory bodies how regulation impacts our industry, so we can work to avoid any disruptions.How can financial services firms best streamline and evolve their collaborations with servicers?Communication is key. Maintaining communication at all different levels, whether it’s at the top or even just down to a specific file, keeping that avenue open is beneficial for everyone involved. It allows you to discuss developing cases and say, “Here’s what could potentially happen as a result.” Especially at events like the Legal League 100 Summits, where it’s a mix of firms, servicers, and even the GSEs, there’s a substantial advantage to getting all of us in the room together talking so we can hopefully avoid problems on down the line.What are the hot topics that are coming up a lot in the industry right now?I run our compliance team, and ‘compliance’ can be defined very broadly. It’s always great to hear about how BCFP rules are changing, the new successor in interest regulations, FDCPA cases, evolving case law across the country in different districts and circuits, and the potential impacts it could have across the jurisdictions. Even if it doesn’t have a direct effect on your day-to-day, it’s going to, in some way, shape, or form, affect your operations. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago David Wharton, Managing Editor at the Five Star Institute, is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, where he received his B.A. in English and minored in Journalism. Wharton has over 16 years’ experience in journalism and previously worked at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm, as Associate Content Editor, focusing on producing media content related to tax and accounting principles and government rules and regulations for accounting professionals. Wharton has an extensive and diversified portfolio of freelance material, with published contributions in both online and print media publications. Wharton and his family currently reside in Arlington, Texas. He can be reached at [email protected] Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Tracking Legislative Processes in Financial Serviceslast_img read more

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California wildfires leave at least 66 dead with more than 600 still missing

first_imgMarcus Yam /Los Angeles Times via Getty Images(PARADISE, Calif.) — Search crews found seven more bodies in the burned-out rubble of Paradise, California, as officials there fear more deaths in the destructive wildfires raging at both ends of the state that has already claimed 66 lives.The deadliest and most destructive of the two massive wildfires is the Camp Fire in Northern California’s Butte County, which has killed at least 63 people.The seven bodies, which were discovered Thursday, were all as a result of the blaze, officials said.There were 631 people still missing in the Butte County fire zones on Thursday night, though authorities were working to track them down. Officials asked residents to go to the Butte County Sheriff’s Department’s website to check the missing persons list to make sure they are not on it.Thom Porter, chief of strategic planning for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, said the death toll from the Camp Fire is expected to climb higher as search crews comb through at least 11,862 structures destroyed by the inferno.“It is by far the most deadly single fire in California history and it’s going to get worse, unfortunately,” Porter said of the Camp Fire.California Gov. Jerry Brown toured the devastation caused by the Camp Fire on Wednesday with Brock Long, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, as well as U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. The government leaders visited the firefighters still battling the blaze, which has burned an area of 141,000 acres and obliterated the city of Paradise, ravaging nearly every home in the bucolic community of 30,000 people.“This is one of the worst disasters I’ve ever seen in my career, hands down,” Long said at a news conference Wednesday in Northern California.Brown said the destruction “looks like a war zone.” He said he spoke earlier Wednesday to President Donald Trump, “who pledged the full resources of the federal government” to help in the recovery effort.Trump said he plans to visit the area on Saturday to meet with survivors and firefighters.A public health emergencyU.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar on Wednesday declared a public health emergency in California.“We are working closely with state health authorities and monitoring the needs of healthcare facilities to provide whatever they may need to save lives and protect health,” Azar said in a statement. “This declaration will help ensure that Americans who are threatened by these dangerous wildfires and who rely on Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program have continuous access to the care they need.”The best time to venture outside will be in the early afternoon, National Weather Service meteorologist Aviva Braun told reporters Wednesday night, blaming the light winds for the continued poor air quality.Lisa Almaguer, public information officer for Butte County Public Health, recommended residents stay indoors as much as possible and to wear properly fitting masks when going outside.On Saturday, stronger northeast winds mixing in the valley will help improve the air quality, according to Braun.In addition, an outbreak of norovirus has occurred at one of the shelters, Almaguer said, describing its presence as “not uncommon,” especially at this time of year and “with hundreds of people living in close quarters.”People who are ill at the shelter have been taken to a separate location, are using separate restroom facilities and are being cared for by public health experts, according to Almaguer.The wildfires forced the evacuation of at least two hospitals and eight other health care facilities. A smoke advisory was issued for portions of Los Angeles County amid concerns that smoke from the fires could present a “significant health threat” for people with asthma and other lung conditions, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.Battle rages onThousands of exhausted firefighters battling the Camp Fire in Northern California and the Woolsey Fire in Southern California appeared to be getting a handle on the two massive blazes.Chief Ken Pimlott, director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, said weather conditions at both fires have improved and the strong winds firefighters were seeing over the past three days have started to dissipate.But Pimlott said “critical fire conditions” still existed with an abundance of dry vegetation in both fire zones that could flare-up with the slightest spark.“We’re not keeping our eye off this ball at all,” Pimlott said Wednesday, adding that 9,000 firefighters were working on the front lines of both blazes.Firefighters, with the help of out-of-state fire crews, were showing progress in their twin battles to subdue the widely destructive blazes that have blackened a combined acreage larger than the size of New York City.The Camp Fire showed “continued activity” on its northeast side, along the Feather River drainage basin, as it pushed toward the community of Big Bar, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection announced Tuesday night.The lower part of the area continued to be a challenge because of the “extremely steep, extremely rocky” terrain, fire officials said.Dry conditions will continue this week but precipitation is expected next week, Braun said.Camp FireThe Camp Fire ignited Nov. 8 in Northern California’s Butte County and has since burned an area of 141,000 acres. The blaze was 40 percent contained on Thursday night.The death toll from the monstrous blaze now stands at 63, making it the deadliest single wildfire in California’s recorded history. Officials have tentative confirmation of the identities of 53 of those found dead but are awaiting DNA confirmation, Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea told reporters Thursday night.The sheriff warned that the remains of some of the missing may never be recovered due to the severity of the fire.Two prison inmate firefighters were among three injured battling the Camp Fire, fire officials told ABC News.Many of the deaths from the Camp Fire have taken place in Paradise, which has been virtually destroyed by the blaze.“The entire community of Paradise is a toxic wasteland right now,” Paradise City Council Member Melissa Schuster, who lost her home in the calamity, told ABC News’ “Start Here” podcast. “In addition to that, and this is the hardest part for me to even talk about, is the number of fatalities is [among] things that we don’t know at this moment and that’s something that has to be determined before people can move back in.”Schuster said teams from the Butte County coroner’s office are combing through thousands of destroyed homes and burned cars in Paradise.“We will rebuild our homes, we will rebuild our town stronger, better, safer and more beautiful than ever,” she told ABC News’ “Start Here” podcast.Woolsey FireThe Woolsey Fire, which also started on Nov. 8, rapidly spread from Southern California’s Ventura County to Los Angeles County, sweeping through the celebrity enclaves of Malibu and Calabasas.The blaze has burned 98,362 acres and was 52 percent contained on Thursday night, as firefighters successfully stretched containment lines. At least 504 structures, including many homes, have been destroyed by the flames.At least three firefighters were injured battling the Woolsey Fire.Firefighters quickly smothered a flare-up Tuesday in the Lake Sherwood and Hidden Valley areas of Ventura County, which was threatening to take off in the windy weather.“We are not out of the woods yet. We still have tough conditions,” Ventura County Fire Chief Mark Lorenzen told reporters at a news conference Tuesday afternoon.Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby said the Woolsey Fire, which has spread to an area about the size of Denver, was the largest his department has battled in 100 years.Despite Tuesday’s flare-up, Osby said, “We are getting the upper hand” on the blaze.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Firms take more cautious approach to hiring staff

first_imgRecent high-profile employee scandals have prompted UK companies to becomeextra vigilant when it comes to hiring new staff, according to research. The Elan Employment Trends Report reveals that in a world where businessesare increasingly security conscious, the HR function is becoming a tool toprotect against staff misconduct. More than half of organisations are now scrutinising prospective staff morethoroughly than they did a year ago. References are an area of particular concern, with 56 per cent of companiesmaking more rigorous checks with past employers. A further 52 per cent of the120 employers surveyed are paying closer attention to a candidate’s previousjob role, and actively checking facts with a jobseeker’s last workplace. Gaps in employment are an added area of concern, with 46 per cent oforganisations double-checking reasons for long periods of unemployment. A further 34 per cent of firms validate a candidate’s qualifications and onein five look closely at a jobseeker’s outside interests. Kate McClorey, board director at Elan, said: “References are still thebest way of verifying a candidate’s claims, and we would encourage employers tocontact referees as a matter of course.” www.elanresource.com Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Firms take more cautious approach to hiring staffOn 26 Nov 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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